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NOAA Science Seminar Series

NOAA Science Seminar Series

The NOAA Science Seminar Series began in 2004 and is a voluntary effort by over 70 NOAA seminar coordinators to integrate and distribute a list of NOAA-hosted, publicly accessible science seminars. In 2020 we shared listings for over 500 seminars!

  • NOAA Science Seminars Contributors
  • For general questions about the NOAA Science Seminar Series, the calendar, and weekly e-mail, contact Hernan Garcia, Tracy Gill, or Lori Brown.
  • For questions specific to a particular seminar, email the contact listed in the seminar description.
  • During the COVID-19 Pandemic: All NOAA seminars will be presented via webinar only.
 

How to Subscribe

Send an email with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov, or:

Visit: https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/onenoaascienceseminars and submit your e-mail address to the subscription form. If you have difficulty with subscribing or unsubscribing from the list, please contact us at hernan.garcia@noaa.gov for assistance.

Once you have subscribed, you will receive a weekly e-mail every Monday morning that summarizes upcoming seminars.

 

Add the NOAA Science Seminar Series to your Google Calendar

If you would like to add the NOAA Science Seminar Series to your own Google calendar view:

Add the seminar calendar, screen 1

Add the seminar calendar, screen 1
(click to enlarge)

  • Open your Google Calendar:
    https://calendar.google.com/
  • On the lower left hand side, look for 'Other calendars'
  • Click the plus sign + to 'Add other calendars'
Add the seminar calendar, screen 2

Add the seminar calendar, screen 2
(click to enlarge)

Add the seminar calendar, screen 3

Add the seminar calendar, screen 3
(click to enlarge)

  • Click the blue button that says 'Add Calendar'
  • Close the 'Settings' panel for your calendar
  • You should now see the NOAA - HQ - Seminar Series events on your own calendar view.

Listings in Google Calendar Format

Google calendar of seminar listings

 

How to Contribute

 

Past Seminars

All seminar are listed in Eastern Time

27 October 2021

Title: Common reed (Phragmites australis) habitat functions in the eastern U.S.
Presenter(s): Erik Kiviat, PhD, Executive Director, Hudsonia
Date & Time: 27 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Common reed (Phragmites australis) habitat functions in the eastern U.S.
Part of the NOAA science seminar series, "Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites",
co-hosted by Dr. Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University

Presenter(s): Erik Kiviat, PhD, Executive Director, Hudsonia

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and
Judith Weis (Professor Emerita, Rutgers)

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/phragmites2/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If entering via browser, PC Windows users should use Google or Edge, and Mac users should use Chrome or Safari. Do not use IE.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, when you launch adobe connect, register as a GUEST with your first and last names, and copy & paste your reg link in the appropriate spot.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Phragmites reedbeds provide habitat functions and non-habitat services; the latter include carbon sequestration, protection of coasts from sea level rise, and amelioration of water quality. Non-habitat services are roughly proportional to Phragmites biomass and productivity, whereas habitat functions for other organisms vary depending on reedbed architecture and the organism in question.Most of the research on habitat functions has addressed nekton, birds, and insects, with less attention to other invertebrates, herpetofauna, mammals, higher plants, and cryptogams. Key questions are: What organisms are associated with reedbeds? Does Phragmites serve as food, shelter, foraging habitat, display perch, basking site, overwintering habitat? How do the habitat functions vary with environmental conditions, characteristics of the reedbed, and its management? Which uses of the habitat stand out as important for biodiversity conservation?
A few examples are songbirds roosting in reedbeds, herons nesting in reedbeds, muskrat use of Phragmites for food and lodge construction, Phragmites as butterfly larval food, reedbeds supporting vines, and bryophytes in the shelter of reeds.

Bio(s): Erik Kiviat has studied Phragmites habitats since observing a song sparrow in a reedbed fifty years ago. During that time, he has worked on freshwater tidal wetlands, biota associated with other nonnative weeds, and human interactions with wetlands, in urban, rural, and wildland environments. He has particularly observed reedbeds in New York and New Jersey, with forays in many other U.S. states and Canadian provinces, as well as Europe and Africa. Erik is the executive director and a co-founder of Hudsonia, and formerly taught natural history and environmental studies at Bard College in Annandale, New York. He holds a B.S. in natural sciences from Bard College, an M.A. in biology State University of New York at New Paltz, and a Ph.D. in ecology from Union Institute. More information is at www.hudsonia.org

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Salvaging Solutions to Abandoned and Derelict Vessels: ADV Policies and InfoHub Reflections
Presenter(s): Katie Register, Executive Director of Clean Virginia Waterways and co-founder of Virginia Plastic Pollution Prevention Network; Jefferson Flood, Coastal Planner for Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program
Date & Time: 27 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Salvaging Solutions to Abandoned and Derelict Vessels: ADV Policies and InfoHub Reflections

Presenter(s): Katie Register, Executive Director of Clean Virginia Waterways and co-founder of Virginia Plastic Pollution Prevention NetworkJefferson Flood, Coastal Planner for Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program

Sponsor(s): NOAA Marine Debris Program
Points of Contact: Sarah Latshaw (Sarah.Latshaw@noaa.gov) and the Salvaging Solutions team (SalvagingSolutions@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://noaaorr.adobeconnect.com/advs/

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be available.

Abstract: Every fourth Wednesday since February, the webinar has featured experts on a topic related to abandoned and derelict vessels (ADVs). The goal of the series was to help communities through sharing perspectives from across the country on common ADV issues and solutions. Our speakers were specialists from federal, state, and local governments, nongovernmental organizations, universities, and industry, and discussed topics about communications, funding, policy, and successes and challenges under blue skies and storm conditions. This month is the final webinar in the series. Our October speakers will focus on discussing a policy white paper developed while establishing a new ADV program in Virginia. In addition, the NOAA Marine Debris Program will provide a brief overview of their ADV InfoHub and look for suggestions to further develop this tool to better serve you.

Recordings: Recordings of previous Salvaging Solutions webinars have been posted on our website. Links to the recordings are available in the "Resources - Links" box or under "Past Salvaging Solutions Webinars" at the bottom of the page.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Long term trends in aerosol chemical and optical properties measured at the Barrow Atmospheric Baseline Observatory northeast of Utqiaġvik
Presenter(s): Trish Quinn, NOAA PMEL
Date & Time: 27 October 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Long term trends in aerosol chemical and optical properties measured at the Barrow Atmospheric Baseline Observatory northeast of Utqiavik

Presenter(s): Trish Quinn1, NOAA PMEL; patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov; Allison Moon2,
Lucia Upchurch3,1, Derek Coffman1, Jim Johnson3,1, Tim Bates3,1, and Betsy Andrews4,51NOAA PMEL
2University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Sciences
3University of Washington, CICOES
4Univeristy of Colorado, CIRES
5NOAA GML

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5043028146609925132
Webinar ID: 728-771-387Test your system here before the seminar!: https://support.goto.com/webinar/system-check-organizer

Abstract: Measurements of aerosol chemical composition at the Barrow Atmospheric Baseline Observatory northeast of Utqiavik, Alaska have been conducted since 1997 to assess the impacts of the transport of pollutants from lower latitudes on Arctic atmospheric chemistry and climate. These measurements have been conducted alongside NOAA GML's observations of aerosol optical properties. Here we report on trends in Arctic haze aerosols in terms of composition, optical properties, and transport pathways. Between 1998 and 2013, haze season submicron non-sea salt sulfate and nitrate decreased by 2 and 1% per year, respectively. Supermicron nitrate decreased by 3% per year. Between 1998 and 2020, haze season submicron aerosol light scattering decreased by 1.6% per year and total scattering (particles less than 10 microns in diameter) decreased by 1.1% per year. Aerosol light absorption has also decreased during the haze season. Based on trajectories calculated with HYSPLIT, these decreasing trends appear to be due, at least in part, to a decrease in transport from the European sector to the Arctic. Summertime trends will also be discussed.

Bio(s): Trish Quinn (patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov) is the Atmospheric Chemistry Group (ACG) Lead at NOAA PMEL. The Atmospheric Chemistry Group has been making shipboard measurements of aerosol chemical, microphysical, optical, and cloud-nucleating properties for over 30 years. The resulting global ocean database can be found at https://saga.pmel.noaa.gov/data/. ACG has also made long-term measurements of aerosol composition at NOAA's northern hemisphere monitoring sites including Barrow. These data can be found at
https://saga.pmel.noaa.gov/data/stations/Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available after the seminar by contacting the presenter(s) directly.
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Supporting the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) Roadmap for Arctic Observing & Data Systems and US AON: The RNA CoObs Project
Presenter(s): Hajo Eicken, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, heicken@alaska.edu and Craig Chythlook, Indigenous Liaison, Food Security Working Group, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, cchythlo@alaska.edu
Date & Time: 27 October 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Supporting the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) Roadmap for Arctic Observing & Data Systems and US AON: The RNA CoObs Project

Presenter(s): Hajo Eicken, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, heicken@alaska.edu and Craig Chythlook, Indigenous Liaison, Food Security Working Group, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, cchythlo@alaska.edu

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5043028146609925132
Webinar ID: 728-771-387
Test your system here before the seminar!: https://support.goto.com/webinar/system-check-organizer

Abstract: The Research Network Activities for Sustained Coordinated Observations of Arctic Change (RNA CoObs) project seeks to support the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) Roadmap for Arctic Observing & Data Systems (ROADS). Through meetings, collaborations, and partnership with the Arctic Observing Summit (AOS) Food Security Working Group (FSWG) and other partners, the project will step through the elements of ROADS, including the identification of Shared Arctic Variables tied to societal benefits as defined by the FSWG, the capture of requirements for observing activities aimed at SAVs, and the design and adaption of information infrastructure. With a focus on the Pacific Arctic the project is meant to help explore and demonstrate how an internationally coordinated roadmap for Arctic observing can be put into action. A number of NOAA Alaska/Arctic activities are of relevance in this context, including NOAA's leadership in regional ocean observing, the U.S. Arctic Observing Network, and the Distributed Biological Observatory. The food security observing roadmap will guide observing activities in the Pacific Arctic and inform the ROADS process at the pan-Arctic scale. ROADS will then better serve operators, the research community, and decision-makers in their own efforts.

Bio(s): Hajo Eicken is Professor of Geophysics and Director of the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. His research focuses on sea ice geophysics, Arctic coastal processes, and their importance for human activities and ecosystems. In Alaska he has helped lead efforts to advance collaborative research with Indigenous knowledge holders and to enhance use of scientific data by Arctic communities and government agencies. He worked with a number of colleagues to establish a sea-ice observatory at Utqiavik/Pt. Barrow. Other collaborative efforts include his involvement in helping launch the Arctic Sea Ice Outlook and Sea Ice Prediction Network, co-leadership of the Arctic Observing Summit, and member of the Science Advisory Board for the 3rd Arctic Science Ministerial. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available after the seminar by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

28 October 2021

Title: Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) Curves for the Chesapeake and Virginia area
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and Art DeGaetano, Director of NOAA's Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/ Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) Curves for the Chesapeake and Virginia Area

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University,
Art DeGaetano, Director, NOAA's Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s):
Ellen Mecray

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of October conditions and Art DeGaetano will speak on the new report produced on Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves and projections for the Chesapeake region and Virginia.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Evaluating the Performance of Northeast Groundfish Fisheries Management in a Changing Ocean
Presenter(s): Mackenzie Mazur and Lisa Kerr, both with Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evaluating the Performance of Northeast Groundfish Fisheries Management in a Changing Ocean.

Presenter(s): Mackenzie Mazur and Lisa Kerr, both with the Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Carbon cycling and storage in tropical and temperate seagrass meadows
Presenter(s): Alyssa Griffin, Ph.D., Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory & Earth and Planetary Sciences Department
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Carbon cycling and storage in tropical and temperate seagrass meadows

Presenter(s):
Alyssa Griffin, Ph.D., Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory & Earth and Planetary Sciences Department

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s):
Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 630 718
Meeting password: 2dUVtkgPX34

Join by phone
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free, Access code: 903 630 718
ABSTRACT
Seagrasses are one of the most widespread coastal ecosystems on Earth. Seagrasses provide many coastal communities with food security, livelihoods, and cultural benefits. They also provide nursing grounds for important fisheries and habitat for many other marine organisms. Seagrasses are important components of both local and global carbon cycles and could play a significant role in various climate change mitigation strategies. These strategies include, but are not limited to, 1) acting as a blue carbon sink by sequestering and storing organic carbon and 2) providing ocean acidification refugia by modifying surrounding seawater carbonate chemistry. Currently, the full potential of these strategies is not well known due to an incomplete understanding of carbon dynamics in seagrass meadows. In particular, the role sedimentary inorganic carbon fluxes play in seagrass carbon cycling remains unclear. In this talk, I will explore the spatial and temporal variability of carbonate chemistry in both tropical and temperate seagrass meadows and implications for the aforementioned mitigation strategies. I will also explain how in addition to storing organic carbon, other biogeochemical processes within sediments may provide a largely unaccounted for blue carbon sink in seagrass ecosystems. Improving our understanding of seagrass carbon dynamics is critical to supporting conservation, management, and restoration efforts of these valuable, but vulnerable ecosystems.
BIOGRAPHY
Dr. Alyssa J. Griffin is a Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory & Earth and Planetary Sciences Department. Her research focuses on the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in nearshore marine environments, particularly within sediments. She uses numerous geochemical tools to understand how carbon storage and cycling in these important ecosystems are influenced by both natural and human-induced stressors across various spatial and temporal scales. Dr. Griffin also continues to initiate, develop, and support efforts that advance justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) within both the geoscience and greater scientific communities and has received multiple awards for this work.
Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Introducing Seascape Alaska: A Regional Mapping Campaign in Support of the National Strategy for Ocean Mapping, Exploring, and Characterizing the U.S. EEZ
Presenter(s): Meredith Westington, Geographer, NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping IOCM Program
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesNOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Introducing Seascape Alaska: A Regional Mapping Campaign in Support of the National Strategy for Ocean Mapping, Exploring, and Characterizing the U.S. EEZ

Presenter(s): Meredith Westington, Geographer, NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Program.

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/akandarctic102821/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. Windows users should use either Google (Chrome), Windows (Edge or Chrome) or Safari (Chrome) if using a Mac. Do not use IE.To enter the webinar via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download
but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time
to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/akandarctic102821/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided

Abstract: Seascape Alaska is a regional campaign supporting the 2020 National Strategy for Mapping, Exploring, and Characterizing the United States Exclusive Economic Zone (NOMEC). Working toward a common goal to fully map the U.S. waters off Alaska, the campaign is a collaboration among federal, tribal, state, and non-governmental partners with a wide range of interests.

Bio(s): Meredith Westington is a geographer with NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Program. She has worked at NOAA's Office of Coast Survey for over 20 years. Meredith has a bachelor's degree in geology from Virginia Tech and a masters degree in GIS Management from Salisbury University.Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Urban Heat Island Community of Practice Webinar Series, Session 7: Prioritize and Integrate Heat Planning
Presenter(s): Ladd Keith, Assistant Professor in Planning, The University of Arizona; Sara Meerow, Assistant Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State; Kizzy Charles-Guzman, Deputy Director, NYC Mayor's Office; Mark Hartman, Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Phoenix; Jane Gilbert, Interim Chief Heat Officer and Resilience Consultant, Miami-Dade County
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Prioritize and Integrate Heat Planning
Part of NOAA's National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) Urban Heat Island Community of Practice Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Ladd Keith, Assistant Professor in Planning, The University of ArizonaSara Meerow, Assistant Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State Kizzy Charles-Guzman, Deputy Director, NYC Mayor's Office

Mark Hartman, Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Phoenix
Jane Gilbert, Interim Chief Heat Officer and Resilience Consultant, Miami-Dade County

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Climate Program Office, National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS)

Seminar Contact(s): Noura Randle, noura.randle@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5384898196534852622

Abstract: While many communities are developing strategies to mitigate and manage heat, these efforts are often siloed, lack coordination, and have unclear evaluation criteria. To better address increasing heat risk, communities must prioritize and integrate heat across their network of plans which includes comprehensive plans, climate action plans, hazard mitigation plans, heat response plans, and emergency management plans. This session will provide examples of innovative cities that have worked to address chronic and acute heat risk across their network of plans, better connecting traditionally siloed disciplines to improve their heat planning efforts..

Bio(s): Learn more about the speakers

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be shared after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Frequency of extreme temperature events in the Arctic, Alaska, and Northeast America
Presenter(s): Muyin Wang, Research Scientist, NOAA/OAR/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 28 October 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar SeriesNOAA in Alaska and the Arctic Seminar Series 2021
The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee.

Title: Frequency of extreme temperature events in the Arctic, Alaska, and Northeast America

Presenter(s):
Muyin Wang, Research Scientist, NOAA/OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)When: Thursday, October 28, 2021, 3:30-4:00pm ET

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region and the NOS Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/akandarctic102821/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. Windows users should use either Google (Chrome), Windows (Edge or Chrome) or Safari (Chrome) if using a Mac. Do not use IE.To enter the webinar via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download
but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time
to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/akandarctic102821/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided

Abstract:
With rapidly warming temperatures, diminishing sea ice cover and loss of glacial mass, the Arctic can be viewed as a bellwether of global climate change. While Arctic change has been documented and projected in terms of changes in mean temperature, changes in extreme events have received less attention. Extreme temperature often causes serious impacts on natural and societal systems. In this study we investigate the frequency of extreme daily temperatures, defined as departures of more than 2 standard deviation from the historical mean(1981-2020), and the projected changes of these events in the future assimilated by the phase 6 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6).Three study areas are of particular interest: the Arctic, the Alaska, and the Eastern North America. The projected changes vary regionally and show a strong dependence on the selected forcing scenario, i.e. Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs). We also examine the correspondence between changes in the mean and changes in the frequency of extreme temperature events.

Bio(s): Dr. Muyin Wang is a research scientist at PMEL and the Cooperative Institute for Climate, Ocean, and Ecosystem Studies (CICOES), University of Washington. She received her B.S and M.S. degrees from Peking University, China, and PhD. from University of Utah. She worked as a research associate at Dalhousie University in Canada before joining PMEL in 2000.Dr. Wang's research has been focused on climate change in the Arctic and northern mid-to-high latitudes, impact of Arctic change on ecosystem, and physical processes that associated with climate change in middle and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. She has done extensive model assessments and tried to provide climate projections with reduced uncertainty by applying observational constraints in model simulated results. She introduced the threshold of ice-free summer Arctic to be 1-million square kilometers in 2009. She published more than 80 journal papers with >9600 citations according to Google Scholar as of Oct. 17, 2021.Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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29 October 2021

Title: Fishing for DNA: how much water to catch and other questions
Presenter(s): Jesse Ausubel, Director, and Mark Stoeckle, Senior Research Associate, both with the Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Date & Time: 29 October 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Fishing for DNA: how much water to catch and other questions
Part of the NOAA Omics Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Jesse Ausubel, Director, Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, and
Mark Stoeckle, Senior Research Associate, Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Katharine.Egan@noaa.gov, NOAA/OAR Oceans Portfolio 'Omics Coordinator and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, NOAA/NOS Science Seminar coordinator.

Remote Access: Register for the webinar here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/fishing4dna/event/registration.htmlAfter registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. Users should use either Edge or Chrome browsers on windows and Safari or Chrome if using a Mac. Do not use IE.Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/fishing4dna/event/registration.html5. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Abstract: Measuring quantities of eDNA is fast becoming a preferred method of learning the presence and abundance of fish and other aquatic species. But how much water need one filter and how much DNA need one process to obtain a reasonably complete and reproducible answer? Tests of an eDNA metabarcoding protocol for marine bony fish show more water, more species of fish up to levels tested. Amplifying decreasing amounts of extracted DNA yields progressively fewer species. Species represented by more copies (reads) of their DNA are detected more reproducibly and with less variation than lower-read species. Findings are consistent with Poisson distribution of rarer eDNA. We also vary PCR cycles, sequencing depth, primer concentrations, and primers. Our findings have multiple practical implications, including for survey strategies for both common and rare species, and identify some limits of knowledge and research directions for aquatic eDNA science.

Bio(s): Dr. Mark Stoeckle's research interests include environmental genomics, DNA barcoding, and visual representation of information. Dr. Stoeckle helped organize the early meetings that laid the foundation for DNA barcoding, a standardized method for rapid identification of animal and plant species. His DNA barcoding work with high school students has attracted wide attention including front-page articles in New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Since 2017 he has been helping develop environmental DNA as a technology for monitoring marine fish and other sea life. He published the first time-series eDNA study of the lower Hudson River estuary in 2017, and helped organize the first National Conference on Marine eDNA, held at Rockefeller University in 2018. He recently led the largest eDNA-bottom trawl study to date in collaboration with colleagues at Monmouth University and New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Dr. Jesse Ausubel directs The Rockefeller University's Program for the Human Environment, which aims to elaborate the technical vision of a large, prosperous society that emits little harmful and spares large amounts of land and sea for nature. Mr. Ausubel initiated and helped lead the Census of Marine Life, Barcode of Life Initiative, and International Quiet Ocean Experiment. In 2000 President Clinton appointed him to the President's Panel on Ocean Exploration. An adjunct scientist of WHOI, he delivered the US Naval Academy's 2015 Michelson Lecture and hosted the 2016 National Ocean Exploration Forum. Mr. Ausubel serves on the Clean Ocean international Expert Group of the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development and on NOAA's Science Advisory Board.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.Slides and

Recordings: A recording of the webinar, a PDF of presentation slides, and a summary of the chat are usually sent to all who register after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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1 November 2021

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, November 2021: Precipitation Forecasts in the Unified Forecast System (UFS) Through Tropical Nudging and Explainable Machine Learning, and A Machine Learning Framework for Predicting Indian Monsoon Onset
Presenter(s): Eric Maloney, Colorado State University, and Nachiketa Acharya, Pennsylvania State University
Date & Time: 1 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Prediction at Weeks 3 - 4 and Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Timescales, November 2021: Precipitation Forecasts in the Unified Forecast System (UFS) Through Tropical Nudging and Explainable Machine Learning, and A Machine Learning Framework for Predicting Indian Monsoon Onset

Presenter(s): Dr. Eric Maloney, Colorado State University, and Dr. Nachiketa Acharya, Pennsylvania State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Weather Program Office S2S Program and NOAA NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration Modeling Program DivisionSeminar Contacts: Karen Keith, karen.keith@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/5514526215193198861

Abstract: This monthly webinar series was created to share ongoing work within NWS and OAR at the Weeks 3-4 and S2S timescales. We would like to foster a relaxed, informal dialogue among forecasters, modelers and researchers. This month, Dr. Eric Maloney will speak about "Improving S2S Precipitation Forecasts in UFS Through Tropical Nudging and Explainable Machine Learning." Dr. Nachiketa Acharya will speak about "Predicting Indian Monsoon onset in S2S scale: A Machine Learning Framework."

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Available on the Weeks 3-4/S2S Webinar Series website: https://vlab.noaa.gov/web/weeks-3-4-s2s-webinar-series

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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2 November 2021

Title: Moving to impact based forecasts: Tools for heat and wind hazards
Presenter(s): Joanne Robbins, Science Manager - Weather Impacts Team, UK Met Office
Date & Time: 2 November 2021
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Moving to impact based forecasts: Tools for heat and wind hazards

Presenter(s): Joanne Robbins, Science Manager - UK Met Office

Sponsor(s): ECCC & NOAA

Seminar Contact(s): Kimberly McMahon, kimberly.mcmahon@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3573001990687176715

Abstract: An active area of research in the Met Office Weather Impacts Team is the development of tools (or applications) that can support operational meteorologists. The team has a particular focus on supporting the issuance of impact based warnings. Using some examples of our recent heat and wind research, this presentation will highlight some of the approaches we are trialling to improve the assessment and communication of future potential risks associated with forecast hazards. The talk will also highlight some of the on-going challenges around impact-based evaluation and developing a robust baseline for risk forecasting, and outline some of the approaches we're testing to address these challenges.

Bio(s): Joanne manages the Weather Impacts Team at the Met Office and has 13 years' experience working on risk and impact modelling for improved forecasting and warning of hydro-meteorological hazards. Her research is focused on 3 themes: developing impact models for hydrometeorological hazards and investigating methods to integrate metrological data with vulnerability and exposure datasets; impact-based evaluation using novel, non-standard observations (e.g. using social sensing methods); landslide forecasting and warning. She is currently leading the Risk-based forecasting and High-Impact weather/Seasonal events' work package of the Weather and Climate Science for Service Partnership India (WCSSP India). Joanne is an active member of several working groups, including the Subseasonal to Seasonal Prediction Project, where she leads the S2S Real Time Pilot Initiative, the HiWeather Project, the UK's Natural Hazards Partnership (NHP) and the international network LandAware.

Recording: A recording will be made available on the NWS YouTube Channel.

Subscribe / Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAA scienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.

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Title: Spatial variability in West Coast groundfish reproduction
Presenter(s): Melissa Head, NOAA NWFSC
Date & Time: 2 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Spatial variability in West Coast groundfish reproduction

Presenter(s):
Melissa Head

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAANMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access:
Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mc81d763fdf4f4a8999be883c6d0d1e65Webex meeting number: 199766 3805 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code:199766 3805

Abstract: Size and age at maturity estimates are essentialparameters for population dynamic models used in stock assessments. The NWFSCimplemented a reproductive program in 2011 to ensure west coast assessments couldaccurately capture variability in spawning capacity. Over the last decade, wehave sampled across the entire west coast range of over 40 groundfish species.This extensive data set allowsfor evaluation of spatio-temporal trends in reproduction, and understandingmore about the drivers of observed variability, i.e. environment, fishingpressure, and/or genetics.

Bio(s):
coming soon

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: Arctic larval fish community changes in relation to recent trends in warming and advection
Presenter(s): Kelia Axler, NOAA NMFS AFSC; kelia.axler@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 2 November 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Arctic larval fish community changes in relation to recent trends in warming and advection

Presenter(s): Kelia Axler, NOAA NMFS AFSC; kelia.axler@noaa.govCo-authors: Esther Goldstein,Jens Nielsen, Alison Deary, Janet Duffy-Anderson; NOAA NMFS AFSC

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6713199503341282316
Webinar ID: 960-228-907Test your system here before the seminar!: https://support.goto.com/webinar/system-check-organizer

Abstract: The Pacific Arctic is rapidly changing due to ocean warming, sea ice loss, and increased advection via the Bering Strait. These physical changes have been linked to climate-mediated range shifts of juvenile and adult subarctic and Arctic fish populations, though less is known about how the earliest life stages (larvae) will respond. In this study, we analyzed time series(2010-2019) data of larval fish distributions sampled in the late summer relative to ocean conditions in the northern Bering (NBS) and Chukchi Sea region (>60N). Multivariate analyses revealed the presence of 3 distinct multi-species assemblages across all years: 1) a warmer-water (7.4C), lower latitude assemblage dominated by yellowfin sole (Limanda aspera); 2) a colder-water (<4.6C), higher latitude assemblage dominated by Arctic cod (Boreogadussaida), Bering flounder (Hippoglossoidesrobustus), and other common Arctic species; and 3) a mixed assemblage(4.6x<7.4C) comprised of the dominant species from the other two assemblages. Partial least squares models found that the areal coverage of the warmer-water assemblage expanded further into the Chukchi Sea in years with higher NBS sea surface temperature (SST), strong Bering Strait northward advection, and increased southerly winds, while the colder-water assemblage retracted its areal coverage in those years. Conversely, the colder-water assemblage expanded in years with lower Chukchi Sea SST and greater sea ice area and extent. Additionally, we observed a general northward latitudinal shift of all three assemblages in recent warm years (2018-2019) characterized by strong northward winds and advection. The patterns observed over the past decade in the NBS-Chukchi Sea region document how quickly larval fish communities track environmental change and provide further evidence of climate warming contributing to a borealization of the Arctic fish community.

Bio(s): Kelia Axler is a research fisheries biologist at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center where she studies climate-mediated shifts in distribution, community structure, and ecology of larval and juvenile Northeast Pacific and Arctic fishes. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available after the seminar by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. By joining you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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3 November 2021

Title:
New
Ecosystem based fishery management benefits in forage fish fisheries
Presenter(s): James N. Sanchirico, Professor, Dept. of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis and Timothy E. Essington, Quantitative Ecologist, School of Fishery Science, University of Washington
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Ecosystem-based fishery management benefits in forage fish fisheries

Presenter(s):
James N. Sanchirico, Professor, Dept. of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis and Timothy E. Essington, Quantitative Ecologist, School of Fishery Science, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinators of NOAA's National Ocean Service science seminar series.

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/foragefish/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. users should use either Google (Chrome), Windows (Edge or Chrome) or Safari (Chrome) if using a Mac. Do not use IE.Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:

After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided

Abstract:
The ecosystem science underpinning ecosystem-based approaches to decision making needs to account for the complexity of multiple interacting components within and across coupled natural-human systems. In this research, we investigate the potential economic and ecological gains from adopting ecosystem-based approaches for the sardine and anchovy fisheries off of the coast of California. Research has shown that while predators in this system are likely substituting one forage species for another, the assemblage of sardine and anchovy can be a significant driver of predator populations. Currently, the harvest control rules for sardine and anchovy fisheries align more with traditional single species framework. We ask: what are the economic and ecological gains when jointly determining the harvest control rules for both forage fish stocks and their predators relative to the status quo? What are the implications of synchronous and anti-synchronous environmental recruitment variation between the anchovy and sardine stocks on optimal food-web management? To investigate these questions, we develop an economic-ecological model for sardine, anchovy, a harvested predator (halibut), and an endangered predator (brown pelican) that includes recruitment variability over time driven by changing environmental conditions. We find significant gains in moving to integrated catch control rules both in terms of the economic gains of the fished stocks, and in terms of the impacts on the brown pelican populations. We also compare the relative performance of current stylized catch control rules to optimal single species and optimal EBFM across ecological and economic dimensions, where the former trade-off considerable economic value for ecological goals. More generally, we demonstrate how EBFM approaches introduce and integrate additional management levers for policymakers to achieve non-fishery objectives at lowest costs to the fishing sectors.

Bio(s):
James N. Sanchirico is a professor of natural resource economics and policy in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at UC Davis. His main research interests are the economic analysis of policy design, implementation, and evaluation for marine and terrestrial species conservation, and the development of economic-ecological models for forecasting the effects of resource management policies. He received the Rosenstiel Award for Oceanographic Sciences in 2012and the UC Davis Distinguished Scholarly Public Service Award in 2014. He is currently a member of the U.S. NASEM Ocean Studies Board, and PI on the NSF-funded Sustainable Oceans National Research Training program at UC Davis. Past professional service includes the Lenfest Fishery Ecosystem Task Force, a National Research Council (NRC) committee evaluating the effectiveness of stock rebuilding plans of the 2006 Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization, and six years on NOAA's Science Advisory Board. Tim Essington is a quantitative ecologist with broad interests in applying ecological principles to fisheries, fisheries management, and conservation. From 2013 to 2021 he was the director of the University of Washington's Center for Quantitative Sciences, which houses the Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management Graduate Program. His recent book Introduction to Quantitative Ecology: Mathematical and statistical modeling for beginners aims to make quantitative ecology accessible to individuals with all levels of experience, expertise, and confidence in their quantitative abilities. Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: Global signals of population stability and trophic control in the fraction of feeding predators
Presenter(s): Mark Novak, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: Global signals of population stability and trophic control in the fraction of feeding predators

Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Novak, Associate Professor, Oregon State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology DivisionSeminar contact: tanya.rogers@noaa.gov.

Remote Access: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m1057b1e24ab938d4f6b7801fbe053454; Password (if needed): p8WXqHE3rf4. Join by video system by dialing 1996016027@noaanmfs-meets.webex.com; Join by phone by dialing +1-415-527-5035 US Toll, Access code: 199 6016027.

Abstract: The attributes of predator-prey interactions and their environment that enable species coexistence, inhibit population cycles, and promote resilient responses to environmental perturbations have undergone intense scrutiny. The need for insight across the varied temporal and spatial scales of ecology is only growing as the effects of environmental change compound. We here employ a simple metric to identify factors driving predator-prey interaction strengths at local to global scales: the fraction of predator individuals who, in the course of a diet survey, are found to have 'non-empty stomachs'. By compiling published diet surveys of predator species spanning the tree of life, the globe, and eight decades, we document heretofore unrecognized taxonomic, ecological, biogeographic, and temporal patterns in this metric. These patterns include a markedly bimodal latitudinal gradient and a decadal-scale temporal dynamic attributable to climate change. Paired with mathematical theory relating the fraction of feeding individuals to the strength of trophic control and the stability of predator-prey interactions, these empirical patterns present new insights for several additional patterns which ecologists have long sought to understand, including the latitudinal gradient in population cycles, the functioning of aquatic versus terrestrial ecosystems, and the effects of generalist versus specialist predators. To corroborate these insights, we provide empirical support for a novel prediction of a latitude-resilience relationship using independent analyses of population time-series obtained from the Global Population Dynamics database.

Bio(s): Mark Novak, Associate Professor in Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, studies how the interactions between species affect the structure and dynamics of ecological communities. His work combines mathematical theory with observational and experimental field approaches (in marine intertidal, kelp forests, and freshwater streams) in an effort to advance the understanding of species-rich systems. Primary topics of research include (i) developing methods for characterizing the strength and functional forms of species interactions, (ii) understanding the influence of direct and indirect effects in complex interaction networks, and (iii) quantifying patterns of individual diet specialization within populations of generalist predators to understand its consequences at the population and community level. Mark received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago (with Tim Wootton) and did his postdoctoral at UC Santa Cruz (with Jon Moore, Tim Tinker, and Mark Carr).

Recordings: The talk will be recorded; link to recording available upon request.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: Developing and Assessing Storminess Indices for Monitoring and Predicting Subseasonal Variations in Storminess near Alaska
Presenter(s): Edmund Chang, Stony Brook University, kar.chang@stonybrook.edu; Wanqiu Wang, NOAA/CPC, wanqiu.wang@noaa.gov; Di Chen, Stony Brook University, di.chen.1@stonybrook.edu; Yutong Pan, NOAA/CPC, yutong.pan@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Developing and Assessing Storminess Indices for Monitoring and Predicting Subseasonal Variations in Storminess near Alaska

Presenter(s):
Edmund Chang, Stony Brook University, kar.chang@stonybrook.edu; Wanqiu Wang, NOAA/CPC, wanqiu.wang@noaa.gov; Di Chen, Stony Brook University, di.chen.1@stonybrook.edu; Yutong Pan, NOAA/CPC, yutong.pan@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4926113776693821452
Webinar ID: 902-953-659
Test your system here before the seminar!: https://support.goto.com/webinar/system-check-organizer


Abstract:
Extratropical cyclones give rise to most of the high impact weather near Alaska, including heavy precipitation and strong winds. Thus it is important for many stakeholders to be warned of approaching periods of increased or decreased potential of storm activities. While individual cyclone tracks can be predicted out to about a week or so, from week 2 on, statistics summarizing cyclone activity, or storminess, are more useful. Storminess can be defined based on Lagrangian cyclone tracking or by Eulerian variance statistics. The outlook includes a combination of both methods. Lagrangian cyclone tracks provide information about where cyclones pass through and are more intuitive to users, while Eulerian variance statistics are expected to be more predictable and have been shown to be highly correlated with cyclone related weather. The outlook uses 6-hrly sub-seasonal forecasts from GEFSv12 and CFSv2. Hindcasts and operational forecasts from 1999-2016 have been used to assess the prediction skill. Our results show that the combined ensemble has higher skill than either individual ensemble. The combined ensemble shows good skill in predicting cyclone amplitude and frequency for week 2, and some skill in predicting these metrics for weeks 3-4. Models also show some skill in predicting the statistics of deep cyclones for week 2. For both week 2 and weeks 3-4, the prediction skills for an Eulerian sea level pressure variance storminess metric is significantly higher than those for Lagrangian track statistics. We expect that the skills for real time forecasts should be higher than those in the hindcasts since the operational ensembles are much larger than the hindcast ensembles. A publicly accessible web page will be developed to display the subseasonal predictions in real time. The web page will also contain information on climatology and forecast verification to enable users to make more informed use of the outlook.

Bio(s):
http://www.msrc.sunysb.edu/~chang/personal/Vita_brief.htm Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available after the seminar by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: Blue-Green Biological Sensing in the Marine Environment: Mechanisms, Regulation, and Evolution.
Presenter(s): Dr. David Kehoe, Indiana University
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Blue-Green Biological Sensing in the Marine Environment: Mechanisms, Regulation, and Evolution.

Presenter(s): David Kehoe, PhD, Indiana University

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Color Coordinating Group (NOCCG)

Seminar Contact(s): Merrie.Neely@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://www.gotomeet.me/MerrieNeely/noccg-seminar---kehoe-iu
You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (312) 757-3121
Access Code: 814-126-813

Abstract: The marine phytoplankton Synechococcus thrives in various light niches in part due to its varied photosynthetic light harvesting pigments. Synechococcus cells use a form of color vision that maximally senses blue and green light to control a process called Type 4 chromatic acclimation (CA4). Cells use the process of CA4 to tune the ratio of two chromophores, green-light absorbing phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and blue-light absorbing phycourobilin (PUB), in their light harvesting complexes or phycobilisomes. We are using molecular tools to study how Synechococcus cells adjust their PEB to PUB ratio within the phycobilisomes in response to changes in the ratio of blue to green light during CA4 and how this system is regulated. We are also investigating the prevalence of CA4 in the marine environment, its ecological role, and its evolution.

Speaker

Bio(s): Dr. Kehoe has earned post-baccalaureate degrees from the University of Washington and his PhD from UCLA, and he performed a post-doctoral study with Stanford University/Carnegie. He joined University of Indiana in 1998 rising to the rank of full professor in 2008. In 2018 he was elected a Fellow at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in 2017 a Research Fellow with the Richard G. Lugar Center for Renewable Energy, in 2015 a Fellow in the American Academy of Microbiology and the American Society for Microbiology; and in 2010 he became the HHMI/U.S. National Academies Education Fellow in the Life Sciences 2007-2008.
Slides, Recordings Other Materials: https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/PastSeminars_NOCCG.php

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/star/OneNOAASeminars.php

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Title: Improving Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Experimental S2S Sea Ice Predictions with a UFS-based System
Presenter(s): Wanqiu Wang, Wanqiu Wang, Yanyun Liu, Jieshun Zhu, Weiyu Yang, Aun Kumar, and David DeWitt; NOAA NWS Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
NOAA in Alaska and the Arctic seminar series 2021 as part of the public-access NOAA Science Seminar Series. The series is endorsed by the NOAA Arctic Executive Committee and sponsored by the NOAA NCEI Regional Climate Services Director, Alaska Region.

Title: Improving Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Experimental S2S Sea Ice Predictions with a UFS-based System

Presenter(s): Wanqiu Wang; Wanqiu.Wang@noaa.gov; Wanqiu Wang, Yanyun Liu, Jieshun Zhu, Weiyu Yang, Aun Kumar, and David DeWitt (NOAA NWS Climate Prediction Center)

Sponsor(s): NOAA NCEI and NOS Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4926113776693821452
Webinar ID: 902-953-659Test your system here before the seminar!: https://support.goto.com/webinar/system-check-organizer

Abstract: Sea ice predictions at subseasonal to seasonal (S2S) time scales have become important products for stakeholders. For example, the NWS Alaska Region requires sea-ice forecasts for the next few weeks to seasons. The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) has been providing sea ice predictions for week-2 to 9-month target periods based on an experimental sea ice prediction system (CFSm5) consisting of the Climate Forecast System (CFS) atmospheric component and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Modular Ocean Model version 5 (MOM5). Sea ice in CFSm5 is initialized from a MOM5-based CPC sea ice initialization system (CSIS). Sea ice forecasts from CFSm5 are significantly better than that from the operational CFS. The NWS Alaska Region uses these CPC sea ice predictions to provide guidance to the DOI, USCG and other partners. CPC's sea ice predictions are also regularly used by Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) in Alaska Region Climate Outlooks. The recent successful development and improvement of the coupled Unified Forecast System (UFS) by the Dynamics and Coupled Modeling Group of the Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) provided an opportunity for CPC to upgrade the CFSm5 to a UFS-based model for the S2S sea ice predictions. In this talk, we report our progress in the use of UFS in sea ice predictions. The final goal is to provide improved real-time week-3/4 and seasonal sea ice outlooks. We will present two major efforts with the UFS: (1) Experiments to adjust cloud parameterizations to reduce model errors in sea surface temperature and sea ice coverage and (2) An evaluation of sea ice predictions based on hindcasts completed with the UFS and comparisons with operational CFS, CFSm5, and observations. The potential of using a multi-model ensemble based on UFS, CFS, and CFSm5 will also be discussed.

Bio(s): Dr. Wanqiu Wang's principal interests are improving predictions of climate anomalies in the earth atmosphere-ocean-ice-land system at subseasonal to seasonal (S2S) time scales, and diagnosing predictability of S2S climate variability and understanding of systematic biases in coupled atmosphere-ocean dynamic forecast models. Dr. Wang received a PhD. degree in atmospheric sciences from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1996. From 1997-2004, Dr. Wang worked at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) environmental modeling center (EMC). Dr. Wang joined the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) in May 2004. The focus of his work is understanding predictability and improving predictions of Tropical intraseasonal and interannual variability, and Arctic sea ice. Dr. Wang has been serving as the chief of the CPC Operational Monitoring Branch of CPC since August 2019. Slides, Recordings Other Materials: Slides available after the seminar by contacting the presenter(s) directly
Recording: Seminars recorded for later viewing in mp4 format

Accessibility: If NOAA staff would like to request an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through the NOAA Office of Human Capital Services' Sign Language Interpreting Services Program or the Relay Conference Captioning service.Notice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: Insights into humpback whale use of entire ocean basins gained through two large, international studies
Presenter(s): David Mattila, Secretariat to the International Whaling Commission and Center for Coastal Studies
Date & Time: 3 November 2021
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Insights into humpback whale use of entire ocean basins gained through two large, international studies

Presenter(s): David Mattila, Secretariat to the International Whaling Commission and Center for Coastal Studies

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2431017328379638795

Abstract: Long-term studies of humpback whales in two key habitats within the United States EEZ, were essential to the establishment of two National Marine Sanctuaries (Stellwagen Banks and the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuaries). These studies also provided the foundation and inspiration for two unprecedented, ocean-basin studies of humpback whales in the North Atlantic Ocean (YONAH project) and the North Pacific Ocean (SPLASH project). The results of the two projects have provided new insights into the complex lives of humpback whales and their use of entire ocean basins. In addition, the two areas have become focal points for understanding how humans impact whales throughout all oceans, and have stimulated actions to reduce those impacts. This discussion will focus on the similarities and differences in humpback whales in the Hawaii and the Atlantic. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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4 November 2021

Title: NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps 101
Presenter(s): LCDR Douglas Pawlishen, OMAO; LT Conor Maginn, OMAO
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps 101

Presenter(s):
LCDR Douglas Pawlishen, OMAO, Chief of NOAA Corps Recruiting & LT Conor Maginn, OMAO, Pilot

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Seminar Contacts: Library.Seminars@noaa.gov; LCDR Douglas Pawlishen (chief.noaacorps.recruiting@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4532362170562430221Summary: What exactly is the NOAA Corps? How does this uniformed service work? What is it like being an new junior officer and progressing through the ranks?Keywords: Honor, Respect, Commitment

Bio(s):
LCDR Pawlishen has enjoyed nearly 10 years serving in the NOAA Corps. He has completed assignments on the NOAA Ship Pisces, R/V Gloria Michelle, NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada, Field Recruiting and is currently head of NOAA Corps Recruiting.LT Conor Maginn has proudly served in the NOAA Corps for 8 years and is currently a pilot for the NOAA Aircraft Operations Center (AOC). He specializes in operating "low and slow" aboard the diverse Twin Otter aircraft. He will present on how NOAA Corps Officers assist in the many operations of AOC, from 600 feet over the ocean conducting marine mammal observations for NMFS to 45,000 ft above a storm conducting hurricane surveillance missions for NWS.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
A recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title:
New
NOAA Diving and Small Boat Operations Safety Tool (DASBOS Tool): Safer and efficient operational planning through GIS Applications
Presenter(s): Joshua Fredrick, LTJG, NOAA Corps, DASBOS Tool Creator & Project Manager and Karen Kavanaugh, Oceanographer, NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services - CO-OPS - and DASBOS Tool Lead GIS Developer & Key Contributor
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Rescheduled from 10/25/21

Title: NOAA Diving and Small Boat Operations Safety Tool (DASBOS Tool): Safer and efficient operational planning through GIS Applications

Presenter(s):
Joshua Fredrick, LTJG/NOAA Corps, DASBOS Tool Creator & Project Manager and
Karen Kavanaugh, Oceanographer, NOAA/NOS/Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) & DASBOS Tool Lead GIS Developer & Key Contributor


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series.
Seminar Contacts: Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, coordinator of NOAA/NOS science seminar series.

Remote Access: Register here:

After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/dasbos/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. users should use either Google (Chrome), Windows (Edge or Chrome) or Safari (Chrome) if using a Mac. Do not use IE.Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume
on your computer speakers or headset.
If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided

Abstract:
NOAA has over 100 dive units with over 330 divers, including 15 NOAA Ships and over 430 NOAA Small Boats across the nation. These dive units are responsible for maintaining water level stations, ship husbandry, services critical to safe navigation, and much more. NOAA Divers operate in diverse environments across the country, but is the water safe to dive in?NOAA Divers face a number of risks each time they enter the water, including contamination that can pose acute or chronic risks to diver health. NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products & Services (CO-OPS) developed the web-based NOAA Diving and Small Boat Operations Safety GIS application (DASBOS Tool) to support pre-dive and small boat risk assessments through analysis of recent and historical water quality data. In addition, the DASBOS Tool provides water level stations (with basic meteorological data), hyperbaric chambers, hospitals, boat ramps, and marinas. This decision support tool allows divers and boaters to efficiently complete in-depth desktop reconnaissance with a single map that integrates both recent and historical data sets from a variety of sources. Equally important to the map itself is the digital backbone supporting it. The tool is an ArcGIS Online application hosted by the NOAA GeoPlatform, enabling cross-agency collaboration. Several CO-OPS data layers are updated directly from the Google Sheets maintained by operational units themselves, making data management easy and transparent. Python-based web-scraping optimizes external datasets, like those of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that provide critical water quality information.The NOAA DASBOS Tool has already demonstrated its value. Last fall, after consulting the tool, CO-OPS averted a dive mission near Lake Charles, Louisiana because of potential water contamination in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura. In the larger NOAA community, the tool is being incorporated into existing planning procedures that support the maintenance and operations of NOAA's fleet of ships and small boats. The DASBOS Tool is now publicly available and utilized by the US Navy and EPA Divers. We encourage you to utilize the DASBOS Tool for your own operations and safety planning. This new application is a powerful example of the capabilities GIS has to inform critical decisions and mitigate health risks.

Bio(s): Josh Fredrick: DASBOS Tool Creator & Project Manager. LTJG Fredrick is a NOAA Corps Officer, currently serving as the NOAA Small Boat Program Executive Officer in Seattle, WA. In six years with the NOAA Corps, he served in dive leadership roles at every duty station. While at NOAA's Center for Operational Products and Services (CO-OPS) in Chesapeake, VA, he was the Hydrographic Support Officer and Unit Dive Supervisor (UDS). Aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette in Honolulu, HI, he served as the Navigation Officer and Ship Dive Officer. The DASBOS Tool was born while LTJG Fredrick served at CO-OPS with incredible support from the CO-OPS GIS Team and Field Operations Division. Karen Kavanaugh: DASBOS Tool Lead GIS Developer & Key Contributor. Kavanaugh is an Oceanographer at NOAA's Center for Operational Products and Services (CO-OPS). She worked for 10 years as the product coordinator for NOAA's operational harmful algal bloom forecasts and has recently transitioned to working on other coastal hazards, including hurricanes, tsunamis, and high tide flooding. She is also a member of the CO-OPS GIS team.Slides / Recording: Slides and recording will likely be shared with all who register for the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: Windows to the Deep: Live conversations on the Blake Plateau
Presenter(s): Dr. Eric S. Lander, President's Science Advisor and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy; Dr. Kirk Johnson, Sant Director, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History; Dr. Richard W. Spinrad, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator; and Symone Barkley, NOAA National Ocean Service
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Windows to the Deep: Live conversations on the Blake Plateau

Presenter(s): Dr. Eric Lander (President's Science Advisor and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy), Dr. Kirk Johnson (Sant Director, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History), Dr. Richard Spinrad (Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator), and Symone Barkley (NOAA National Ocean Service).

Sponsor(s): White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History and NOAA Ocean Exploration.

Seminar Contact(s): Rachel Gulbraa Rachel.Gulbraa@noaa.gov

Remote Access: TBA

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: Join Eric Lander, Kirk Johnson, Richard Spinrad, and Symone Barkley for a live interaction with mission personnel aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during their exploration of Blake Plateau in the western Atlantic Ocean. This live interaction will bring the excitement of discovery directly to people as ocean explorers image this seafloor for the first time using marine robotic technology and share their real-time discoveries through a live-streamed video feed. The event will further curiosity in ocean biodiversity about which much is unknown and highlight the importance of the ocean for addressing the climate crisis, rebuilding the economy, and advancing environmental justice.

Bio(s): Dr. Eric S. Lander (President's Science Advisor and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy), Dr. Kirk Johnson (Sant Director, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History), Dr. Richard W. Spinrad (Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator), and Symone Barkley (NOAA National Ocean Service).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recording will be available after the event. Watch this site for details.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title: Using modern and traditional aquaculture technology as a tool in restoration aquaculture within coastal communities of the Pacific Basin, Fishponds, Clam Gardens and Kelp Lines
Presenter(s): Mark Tagal & Ikaika Rogerson, Aquaculturist IBSS Corp/Waimanalo Limu Hui
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Using modern and traditional aquaculture technology as a tool in restoration aquaculture within coastal communities of the Pacific Basin, Fishponds, Clam Gardens and Kelp Lines

Presenter(s): Mark Tagal & Ikaika Rogerson, Aquaculturist IBSS Corp/Waimanalo Limu Hui

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 630 718
Meeting password: 2dUVtkgPX34

Join by phone
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free, Access code: 903 630 718

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBDNotice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: Close-kin genetic methods for estimating census size and effective population size
Presenter(s): Robin Waples, Senior Scientist, NWFSC, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 4 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Close-kin genetic methods for estimating census size and effective population size (National Stock Assessment Science Seminar Series)

Presenter(s):
Robin Waples, Senior Scientist, NWFSC, Seattle, WA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and NOAA's Central Library (NCL)

Seminar Contact(s):
Kristan Blackhart and Library Seminars

Remote Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5820361977154331659

Abstract:
It is now possible to genetically identify close relatives in wild populations, and this information can be used in a mark-recapture framework (CKMR) to estimate abundance (N). Successful CKMR applications require information about vital rates and other life history traits, and the same genetic and demographic data can be used to estimate effective population size (Ne), the evolutionary analogue to N. I discuss how life history information differently affects CKMR estimates of N and genetic estimates of Ne, and how combined datasets can be leveraged to better understand both the ecological and evolutionary correlates of abundance. Waples, R. S., & Feutry, P. (2021). Close-kin methods to estimate census size and effective population size. Fish and Fisheries, 00, 1" 21. https://doi.org/10.1111/faf.12615


Bio(s):
For over a decade, Robin led a group charged with developing the scientific basis for listing determinations and recovery planning for Pacific salmon under the federal Endangered Species Act. A major theme of his research has been to apply evolutionary and ecological principles to real-world problems in conservation and management. Often this involves adapting standard population genetics models to better comport with life histories of actual species.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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5 November 2021

Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Carolinas and Alaska
Presenter(s): Kathie Dello, Carolinas Collaborative on Climate, Health, and Equity; and Sarah Trainor, Director, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy
Date & Time: 5 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar - see description
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Carolinas and Alaska

Presenter(s):

Kathie Dello, Director, Carolinas Collaborative on Climate, Health, and Equity;
Sarah Trainor, Director, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Sponsor(s):
OAR Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program


Seminar Contact(s):
Sean Bath, sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Remote via GoToWebinar. You must register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/89661193580860427


Accessibility:
A transcript will be generated in the recording. If additional accommodations needed, please contact Sean Bath at sean.bath@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The NOAA Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program invests in research and engagement that expands regional capacity to adapt to climate change in the U.S. RISA's regional teams build sustained relationships between decision makers and researchers that support collaborative and equitable adaptation to climate risks. In Fiscal Year 2021, the RISA program launched 9 new 5-year RISA teams. This webinar series is a venue to introduce each team, discuss major themes and partners, and preview the projects that will advance climate knowledge and adaptation capacity in their regions.RISA's Carolinas region includes North Carolina (NC) and South Carolina (SC). The RISA team, Carolinas Collaborative on Climate, Health, and Equity (C3HE), is based at NC State University, the NC State Climate Office, UNC Chapel Hill, Furman University, NC Central University, NC Sea Grant, SC State University, and the NC Museum of Life and Science. C3HE will build upon years of regional work on climate science, tools and assessments to move into a new phase that centers Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (JEDI) principles at the forefront of NOAA-funded climate research and to deliver climate futures to more communities than have been previously served. They will apply a bottom-up participatory action approach to develop a transferable model for end-to-end co-production of actionable and equitable climate resilience solutions in at-risk communities in the Carolinas. The team's aims include: Aim 0. Demonstrate our commitment to address the climate reality in a just and equitable way, while ensuring the inclusivity and diversity of all voices are represented in every aspect of our work in the Carolinas; Aim 1. Build and enhance local partnerships in underserved communities across the Carolinas to identify, test, and refine equitable solutions for climate resilience; Aim 2. Understand and predict how co-occurring and consecutive hazards interact with exposure and vulnerability to shape climate risk; Aim 3. Identify and connect the complex linkages between structures of power, intersecting social positions, and climate-health inequities in vulnerable communities; and Aim 4. Design and implement community-sciences programs to track physical and social science metrics and build community-level climate resiliency literacy. Learn more at https://climate.ncsu.edu/c3he/RISA's Alaska region includes all parts of the vast state of Alaska. The RISA team, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), is based at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.ACCAP's portfolio of interwoven research and engagement in Alaska will support the underlying vision of building healthy and thriving Alaskan communities. Core themes include extreme events and impacts and capacity building in support of Tribal resilience. In the extreme events work, the team will use an integrated scientific approach that brings together social science, climate science, and local expertise to: a) document socio-economic impacts of extreme climate and weather events in Alaska; b) engage practitioners to determine and meet information needs; and c) analyze historical and projected changes in extreme event occurrences to inform policy and decision-making. The work will support Tribal resilience by: a) bridging community-level climate adaptation planning and implementation with workforce and economic development; b) investigating and supporting boundary spanning and knowledge co-production between Alaska Native communities and climate and related researchers; c) innovating evaluation methodology and elevating Indigenous evaluation of climate-related knowledge co-production and climate adaptation. Hallmarks of new outreach and engagement activities in this project include assessment products that encompass societal impacts and adaptation, training for students and postdoctoral fellows, online course development, and enhanced convening activities with a focus on serving the needs of policy-makers, Alaska Native Peoples, tribes, and organizations throughout the state. This team includes a sustained assessment specialist and small-grant competition, which like the core portfolio, aims to fulfill ACCAP's vision of thriving Alaskan communities, economies, and ecosystems. Learn more at https://uaf-accap.org/

Bio(s): Kathie Dello is the co-lead PI of the newly-formed Carolinas NOAA RISA, the Carolinas Collaborative for Climate, Health, and Equity (C3HE). She also serves as the Director of the State Climate Office of North Carolina and the State Climatologist of North Carolina, located at NC State University. Kathie is the first woman to serve in the State Climatologist role in the office's 46-year history. Kathie leads one of the most robust and well-resourced state climate offices in the country, which serves a deep bench of stakeholders across various sectors in North Carolina through research and extension. She is an author on the Southeast chapter of the 5th National Climate Assessment, and has participated in many state-level assessment and adaptation efforts in Oregon and North Carolina. She was an author on the 2020 North Carolina Climate Science Report, and served as a technical advisor to the 2020 North Carolina Risk and Resilience Plan. Prior to her time at NC State, she served as the Associate Director of the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute at Oregon State University. She has a PhD in Environmental Sciences from Oregon State University. In her spare time, Kathie likes to ride her bike and explore the Carolinas from the mountains to the beach.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
The recording will be sent to those who register and all videos will be posted to https://cpo.noaa.gov/risaSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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9 November 2021

Title: Crab reproduction and management implications in the eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Laura Slater, University of Alaska Fairbanks, CFOS
Date & Time: 9 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Crab reproduction and management implications in the eastern Bering Sea

Presenter(s): Laura Slater, University of Alaska Fairbanks, CFOS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAANMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mc81d763fdf4f4a8999be883c6d0d1e65Webex meeting number: 199766 3805 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code:199766 3805

Abstract: coming soon

Bio(s): coming soon

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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10 November 2021

Title: The effects of non-native marsh grass (Phragmites australis) on coastal nitrogen cycling
Presenter(s): Mollie R. Yacano, PhD Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Date & Time: 10 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: The effects of non-native marsh grass(Phragmites australis) on coastal nitrogen cycling
Part of the NOAA science seminar series, "Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites",
co-hosted by Dr. Judith S. Weis, Professor Emerita, Rutgers University

Presenter(s): Mollie R. Yacano, PhD Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and
Judith Weis (Professor Emerita, Rutgers)

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/phragmites3/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app.
If entering via browser, PC Windows users should use Google or Edge, and Mac users should use Chrome or Safari. Do not use IE.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/phragmites3/event/registration.htmlAttendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: The European haplotype of Phragmites australis is an aggressive and widespread invader in the United States, capable of growing in fresh, brackish, and fully saline habitats. It is typically considered a nuisance invader and is a common target for eradication, which is rarely successful. Though historically viewed as detrimental, studies have found P. australis performs closely to or outperforms native marsh plants in provision of ecosystems services such as carbon storage, sediment accretion, storm protection, and nitrogen removal. Our previous work established P. australis enhances sediment denitrification relative to native salt marsh habitats, but it is currently unknown if P. australis performs this ecosystem service equally across the wide range of habitats it inhabits in coastal urban areas. In addition, understanding impacts of eradication attempts on denitrification capacity is critical. Though we have not yet observed differences between net denitrification rates in P. australis sediments from most landscape settings or eradication treatments, we have found rates differ significantly between marine and brackish sites. Our work aims to provide context to understand potential impacts of invasion and control measures of P. australis across the coastal landscapes in Eastern North Carolina.

Bio(s): Mollie Yacano received a BA from Boston University and is currently a PhD candidate in the Piehler Lab at University of North Carolina's Institute of Marine Sciences. Her research focuses primarily on the role of invasive species on altering coastal biogeochemistry. She is particularly interested in how her research can be applied to better inform coastal management policies. She is the current North Carolina Sea Grant (NCSG) and North Carolina Coastal Reserve(NCCR) Fellow and was previously the NCSG and Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Partnership (APNEP) Fellow. She serves in leadership roles for the Scientific Research and Education Network (SciREN) and Growing Equity in Science & Technology (GEST), both aimed at increasing STEM literacy and visibility in K12 schools. She is also the founding member of the Eastern North Carolina chapter of the Society for Women in Marine Science (SWMS).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title: Monitoring Ocean Acidification in Alaska's Marine Ecosystems
Presenter(s): Natalie Monacci, MSc, University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Ocean Acidification Research Center | Fairbanks, AK
Date & Time: 10 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Monitoring Ocean Acidification in Alaska's Marine Ecosystems

Presenter(s): Natalie Monacci, MSc, University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Ocean Acidification Research Center

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Post Doctoral Researcher Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: Ocean Acidification (OA) is an important manifestation of global climate change, a result of anthropogenically increased carbon dioxide in the oceans. OA has the potential to negatively affect Alaska's Blue Economy by changing ocean chemistry, which could have impacts on culturally and commercially important species. Research conducted by the Ocean Acidification Research Center (OARC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) scales the intensity, duration, and extent of OA events around the state. Projects in the Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea, and Beaufort Sea will be presented and include observations from long-term autonomous monitoring, repeat hydrographic projects, and modelling efforts. The 10-year collaboration between the UAF's OARC and NOAA's EcoFOCI to outfit the Bering Sea biophysical mooring site 2 (M2) will be highlighted. The OARC outfits NOAA's surface mooring at M2, affectionately known as Peggy, with instrumentation to monitor carbonate system variables. As a result, Peggy, in addition to NOAA's core biophysical observations, is part of a worldwide network to gather long-term data on carbon dioxide in the ocean and how OA is progressing in different regions.

Bio(s): Natalie Monacci is the Deputy Director of the Ocean Acidification Research Center (OARC) at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks where she has been managing all OARC activities since 2010

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker at nmonacci@alaska.edu. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title: Every Calf Counts: Hawaii’s humpback whale mother and calf pairs in a time of changing climate
Presenter(s): Dr. Rachel Cartwright, Lead Researcher, Keiki Kohola Project
Date & Time: 10 November 2021
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Every Calf Counts: Hawaii's humpback whale mother and calf pairs in a time ofchanging climate

Presenter(s): Dr. Rachel Cartwright, Lead Researcher, Keiki Kohola Project

Sponsor(s): NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4744828498290918927

Abstract: Each winter, humpback whales from across the North Pacific head to Hawaiian waters to breed and raise their young. Within the islands, the nearshore waters along the western shoreline of Maui, Hawai'i are a favored nursery region for mothers and their young calves. Over the past twenty years"the Keiki Kohola Project"a small, grassroots research organization based on Maui, has been working to provide information to help ensure the well-being of mothers and calf pairs during this critical nursery period.Between 2015 and 2017, dramatic increases in water temperatures in the North Pacific severely impacted the region's marine ecosystem. These impacts included the food supplies on which Maui's humpback whales depend. Join Dr. Rachel Cartwright to learn how Maui's mothers and their calves weathered these lean years. We provide up-to-date information on their current status, and finally we focus on how humpback whale mother and calf pairs.More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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12 November 2021

Title: What happens after Phragmites is treated with herbicide – a view over 5 years
Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and Founding Director, North American Orchid Conservation Center
Date & Time: 12 November 2021
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: What happens after Phragmites is treated with herbicide " a view over 5 years.
Part of the NOAA webinar series - Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites
Note: Dr. Whigham will present the following (second 20-minute) talk right after this one:
If you remove Phragmites, does planting native clonal species enhance restoration?

Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and Founding Director, North American Orchid Conservation CenterCo-Authors:
- Karin Kettenring, Professor of Wetland Ecology, Utah State University
- Christine Rohol, Post-doctoral Fellow, University of Florida
- Eric Hazelton, Ph.D., Independent Ecologist

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and Judith Weis
(Professor Emerita, Rutgers)

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/phrag_whigham/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. If you login via browser, PC/Windows users should use Chrome or Edge, and Mac users
should use Chrome or Safari. Do not use IE.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/phrag_whigham/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): The ecology of plants has been Dennis Whigham's primary interest and his research has resulted in journeys through forests, fields and wetlands around the world. Explorations have led to studies of woodland herbs " including orchids, vines, wetland species, invasive species and studies of forests in the tropics, temperate and boreal zones. In recent years, studies of interactions between orchids and fungi have resulted in new and exciting directions. Whigham's current research projects focus on the role of wetlands associated with juvenile salmon habitat in Alaska headwater streams; the rarest terrestrial orchid in eastern North America; and an invasive wetland species that is rapidly expanding across the country. His current passion is to establish the North American Orchid Conservation Center (NAOCC), an initiative of the Smithsonian and the United States Botanic Garden. NAOCC's mission is to secure the genetic diversity of native orchids for future generations. The NAOCC model for orchid conservation is based on public-private collaborations and there are currently more than fifty collaborating organization distributed across the continent from Florida to Alaska. Whigham obtained an undergraduate degree from Wabash College and a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina. He joined the Smithsonian in 1977. Whigham and his collaborators have published more than 250 articles in journals and he has co-edited 10 books.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Great Lakes, South Central, and Pacific Northwest
Presenter(s): Maria Carmen Lemos, GLISA; Rachel Riley, SCIPP; and Amy Snover, NCRC
Date & Time: 12 November 2021
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Great Lakes, South Central, and Pacific Northwest


Presenter(s):

Maria Carmen Lemos, Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments GLISA;
Rachel Riley, Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program SCIPP
Amy Snover, Northwest Climate Resilience Collaborative NCRC

Sponsor(s):
OAR Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program


Seminar Contact(s):
Sean Bath, sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Remote via GoToWebinar. You must register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/836951967979650064


Accessibility:
A transcript will be generated in the recording. If additional accommodations needed, please contact Sean Bath at sean.bath@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The NOAA Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program invests in research and engagement that expands regional capacity to adapt to climate change in the U.S. RISA's regional teams build sustained relationships between decision makers and researchers that support collaborative and equitable adaptation to climate risks. In Fiscal Year 2021, the RISA program launched 9 new 5-year RISA teams. This webinar series is a venue to introduce each team, discuss major themes and partners, and preview the projects that will advance climate knowledge and adaptation capacity in their regions.RISA's Great Lakes region serves the Great Lakes basin, including parts of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Ontario. The RISA team, Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments (GLISA), is based at the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, College of the Menominee Nation, and University of Wisconsin-Madison.RISA's South Central region includes the states of Oklahoma, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas. The RISA team, Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program (SCIPP), is based at the University of Oklahoma, Louisiana State University, Texas A&M University, and Texas Sea Grant. RISA's Pacific Northwest region includes the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and parts of Montana. The RISA team, Northwest Climate Resilience Collaborative (NCRC), is based at the University of Washington, Portland State University, Washington Sea Grant, Front and Centered, American Farmland Trust, and the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians.

Bio(s):
TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
The recording will be sent to those who register and all videos will be posted to https://cpo.noaa.gov/risaSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: If you remove Phragmites, does planting native clonal species enhance restoration?
Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and Founding Director, North American Orchid Conservation Center
Date & Time: 12 November 2021
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: If you remove Phragmites, does planting native clonal species enhance restoration?
Part of the NOAA webinar series - Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites
Note: Dr. Whigham will present this 30-minute NOAA seminar talk directly after this one:
What happens after Phragmites is treated with herbicide " a view over 5 years.

Presenter(s): Dennis Whigham, PhD, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and Founding Director, North American Orchid Conservation CenterCo-Authors:
- Sylvia Jacobson, MS Student, University of Maryland
- Andy Baldwin, Professor, University of Maryland
- Melissa McCormick, Ecologist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
- Eric Buehl, Regional Watershed Restoration Specialist, University of Maryland Sea Grant
Extension Program
- Karin Kettenring, Professor of Wetland Ecology, Utah State University

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and Judith Weis
(Professor Emerita, Rutgers)

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/phrag_whigham/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app. users should use either Google (Chrome), Windows (Edge or Chrome) or Safari (Chrome) if using a Mac. Do not use IE.Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.
If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/phrag_whigham/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): The ecology of plants has been Dennis Whigham's primary interest and his research has resulted in journeys through forests, fields and wetlands around the world. Explorations have led to studies of woodland herbs " including orchids, vines, wetland species, invasive species and studies of forests in the tropics, temperate and boreal zones. In recent years, studies of interactions between orchids and fungi have resulted in new and exciting directions. Whigham's current research projects focus on the role of wetlands associated with juvenile salmon habitat in Alaska headwater streams; the rarest terrestrial orchid in eastern North America; and an invasive wetland species that is rapidly expanding across the country. His current passion is to establish the North American Orchid Conservation Center (NAOCC), an initiative of the Smithsonian and the United States Botanic Garden. NAOCC's mission is to secure the genetic diversity of native orchids for future generations. The NAOCC model for orchid conservation is based on public-private collaborations and there are currently more than fifty collaborating organization distributed across the continent from Florida to Alaska. Whigham obtained an undergraduate degree from Wabash College and a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina. He joined the Smithsonian in 1977. Whigham and his collaborators have published more than 250 articles in journals and he has co-edited 10 books.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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15 November 2021

Title: A paradigm shift: Rethinking Phragmites in the context of ecosystem resilience with insights from a meta-analysis and global change experiments
Presenter(s): Tom Mozdzer, Professor, Bryn Mawr College
Date & Time: 15 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: A paradigm shift: Rethinking Phragmites in the context of ecosystem resilience with insights from a meta-analysis and global change experiments
A NOAA science seminar series - Rethinking the Common Reed Grass - Phragmites

Presenter(s): Tom Mozdzer, Professor, Bryn Mawr College

Sponsor(s): NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series

Seminar Contacts: Tracy Gill (NOAA/NOS science seminar coordinator) and
Judith Weis (Professor Emerita, Rutgers)

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/mozdzer/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link.You may enter via a browser or the Adobe Connect app.

If entering via browser, PC Windows users should use Google or Edge, and Mac users should use Chrome or Safari. Do not use IE.If you want to enter via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
3. After downloading and testing Adobe Connect, login with the registration link you got in the confirmation email.Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): The Mozdzer Ecology lab uses an interdisciplinary approach, combining plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry, and population genetics to better understand how wetland ecosystems may respond to global change. Currently, Professor Mozdzer is investigating the effects of global change on Phragmites australis invasion in an ecosystem level study at the Smithsonian Global Change Research Wetland. He is interested in understanding how the process of invasion may change with predicted levels of atmospheric CO2 and anthropogenic nitrogen pollution, along with the role of intraspecific genetic diversity in plant invasion. He is also collaborating with colleagues at MBL, the University of Massachusetts-Boston, Boston University, and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center to understand the effects of chronic nutrient pollution in plant communities in the TIDE project. He has broad interests in plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry, and is also very interested in understanding the impacts of plant invasion on ecosystem carbon cycling and greenhouse gas emissions.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides may be shared and the recording will be shared, after the webinar with all who register, and with anyone who requests them from the seminar contacts. You may view the recording of this webinar thru Adobe Connect, here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/pldziw3qy69h/ and if it does not open, select
"Continue in Browser".

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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16 November 2021

Title: From the Bottom of the Ocean to the Surface of the Sun: Working Across NOAA to Steward the Diversity of NOAA’s Environmental Data
Presenter(s): Monica Youngman, Data Stewardship Division Chief, National Centers for Environmental Information -NCEI-, NOAA NESDIS
Date & Time: 16 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: From the Bottom of the Ocean to the Surface of the Sun: Working Across NOAA to Steward the Diversity of NOAA's Environmental Data
Part of the get to know NCEI seminar series

Presenter(s): Monica Youngman, Data Stewardship Division Chief, National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), NOAA NESDIS; monica.youngman@noaa.gov


Sponsor(s): NOAA NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)

Seminar Contacts: fred.burnett@noaa.gov, jake.crouch@noaa.gov, hernan.garcia@noaa.gov


Remote Access: Please register at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/4405145375161734669,
after registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
If you are joining from a telephone, dial:
562-247-8422
Access code: 794-335-043
Note: When you register, simply copy the gotowebinar link to your calendar for the Nov 16 event.

Abstract: Ever have trouble finding data? Understanding how to use it? Have challenges combining it with other data? Then you understand why stewarding NOAA's environmental data to ensure it is findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable is critical to providing the highest value from NOAA's investment in Earth observations. NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Data (NCEI) works with partners across NOAA and beyond to ensure that NOAA's data are broadly available, independently understandable, and reusable for future generations, supporting NOAA's mission of science, stewardship, and service. Join this seminar to learn more about why this work is important and the challenges, how NCEI partners across the organization to meet these goals, and the foundational stewardship services NCEI offers.


Bio(s): Monica Youngman is the Chief of the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Data Stewardship Division providing archive and access services for NOAA's environmental data. In this role she focuses on making NOAA's data findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable by building relationships with stakeholders to understand needs, improving the data archiving and access processes, and expanding use of Cloud technology. Prior to joining NCEI in 2018, Monica worked for NOAA's National Geodetic Survey in a number of positions, most recently leading the multi-million dollar Gravity Program that includes the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project. She has a Masters of Environmental Management from Duke University as well as bachelors degrees in political science and physics from Iowa State University.

Slides /

Recordings: Provided after the seminar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title: Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Pacific Islands, Mid-Atlantic, and Urban Northeast
Presenter(s): Victoria Keener, Pacific RISA, et al.
Date & Time: 16 November 2021
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar see description
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Adapting to Climate with NOAA RISA in the Pacific Islands, Mid-Atlantic, and Urban Northeast


Presenter(s):


Victoria Keener, Co-Lead Investigator, Pacific RISA
Laura Brewington, Co-Lead Investigator, Pacific RISA
Debra Knopman, Senior Principal Researcher, Mid-Atlantic RISA
Krista Romita Grocholski, Program Manager, Mid-Atlantic RISA
Radley Horton, Lead Principal Investigator, Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN)
Dan Bader, Program Manager, Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN)

Sponsor(s):
OAR Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program


Seminar Contact(s):
Sean Bath, sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Remote via GoToWebinar. You must register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4547948847348338960


Accessibility:
A transcript will be generated in the recording. If additional accommodations needed, please contact Sean Bath at sean.bath@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The NOAA Climate Program Office's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program invests in research and engagement that expands regional capacity to adapt to climate change in the U.S. RISA's regional teams build sustained relationships between decision makers and researchers that support collaborative and equitable adaptation to climate risks. In Fiscal Year 2021, the RISA program launched 9 new 5-year RISA teams. This webinar series is a venue to introduce each team, discuss major themes and partners, and preview the projects that will advance climate knowledge and adaptation capacity in their regions.RISA's Pacific Islands region includes Hawai'i, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, Republic of Palau, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Federated States of Micronesia. The RISA team, Pacific RISA, is based at the Arizona State University Global Institute of Sustainability and Innovation, East-West Center, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, NOAA/NCEI's Center for Weather and Climate (CWC), and the NOAA Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR). RISA's Mid-Atlantic region includes Virginia, Maryland, the District of Columbia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and parts of West Virginia. The RISA team, Mid-Atlantic RISA (MARISA), is based at the RAND Corporation, Pennsylvania State University, Johns Hopkins University, Cornell University, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Morgan State University, and Carnegie Mellon University. RISA's Urban Northeast region serves the urban corridor from Philadelphia to New York City to Boston, which includes New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and some counties of Pennsylvania, New York, New Hampshire, and Maine. The RISA team, Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), is based at Columbia University, Boston University, Rutgers University, Drexel University, Stevens Institute of Technology, and City University of New York - Hunter College.RISA's Great Lakes region serves the Great Lakes basin, including parts of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Ontario. The RISA team, Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments (GLISA), is based at the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, College of the Menominee Nation, and University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Bio(s):
TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
The recording will be sent to those who register and all videos will be posted to https://cpo.noaa.gov/risaSubscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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17 November 2021

Title: Connecting microbes, phytoplankton, and oceanography in the California Current with eDNA and metagenomes
Presenter(s): Dr. Nastassia Patin, Postdoctoral Research, NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Stationed at Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Connecting microbes, phytoplankton, and oceanography in the California Current with eDNA and metagenomes - Part of the NOAA 'Omics Seminar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Nastassia Patin, Postdoctoral Research, NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS), University of Miami, Miami, FL, Stationed at Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA

Sponsor(s): NOAA OAR Omics and NOAA National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series
Seminar Contacts: Katharine.Egan@noaa.gov, NOAA/OAR 'Omics Coordinator and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Coordinator

Remote Access: Register here:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/calicurrentedna/event/registration.html
After registering, you will receive an email with a login link. You may enter via a browser OR the Adobe Connect app.To enter the webinar via browser, PC/Windows users should use either Chrome or Edge, and Mac users should use Safari or Chrome. Do not use IE.To enter the webinar via the Adobe Connect app you must download it ahead of time.
1. If you have downloaded and used Adobe Connect recently, you do not need to download
but you can test it here.
2. If you have NOT used Adobe Connect, you must download Adobe connect ahead of time
to use it, and your IT staff may need to do it. The download is here. After downloading Adobe Connect, it is important to TEST your ability to use Adobe Connect, well before the webinar, here.
Attendees are muted during the webinar and audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset, or once in adobe connect.

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: The California Current is a highly productive ecosystem with several ecologically and economically valuable fisheries. Local oceanographic phenomena like upwelling and basin-scale environmental perturbations like El Nio/La Nia cycles can impact all levels of the food web; however, the propagation of these effects through trophic levels is largely unknown due to a poor understanding of linkages between microbes, plankton, and metazoans. Here, we present data from a multi-year time series of microbial metagenomes, metabarcoding, and ocean chemistry to show how microbiomes correlate with phytoplankton and metazoan community dynamics. We used metagenome-assembled genomes and gene functions to characterize microbial communities and connect them to higher trophic level community composition. Using supervised machine learning methods, we found season- and depth-dependent microbiomes can predict distinct phytoplankton regimes, particularly diatom vs dinoflagellate dominated surface waters. We also found strong correlations between microbes and coccolithophore (E. huxleyi) abundances. This connectivity is driven by microdiverse heterotrophic microbial lineages including SAR324 and Nitrosopumilus. These combined omics approaches provide a holistic overview of marine ecosystems and may improve biological oceanographic modeling of environmental perturbations in the future.

Bio(s): Nastassia Patin got her Ph.D. at Scripps Institution of Oceanography where she studied the chemical ecology of marine sediment bacteria and their bioactive compounds. She then did a postdoc with Frank Stewart and Kostas Konstantinidis at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, where she worked in a variety of marine systems to understand the role of the microbiome in ecosystem health and function. She focused on applying metagenomic and bioinformatic tools to recover high-quality genomes of uncultured marine microbes and link them to biotic and abiotic processes. In 2020,, she joined AOML where she currently works with Kelly Goodwin to leverage eDNA sequence data from the California Current to understand linkages among microbes, plankton, and metazoans while advancing Omics efforts more broadly at NOAA. In her free time Nastassia enjoys surfing, biking, cooking, and hanging out with her two cats.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: A recording of the webinar and a PDF of presentation slides are usually sent to all registrants after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject; visit the NOAA Science Seminar website for more information. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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Title:
New
The connection between physiology, ecology, and life histories from a macroecological perspective
Presenter(s): Jennifer Bigman, PhD, National Research Council Postdoctoral Researcher, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The connection between physiology, ecology, and life histories from a macroecological perspective

Presenter(s): Jennifer Bigman, PhD, National Research Council Postdoctoral Researcher, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Post Doctoral Researcher Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: An alternative perspective on the relationships among physiology, ecology, and life histories, focusing on the predictions generated by ecological theory and the generality of patterns.

Bio(s): Jennifer is an NRC Postdoctoral Associate and Ecologist with expertise in metabolic ecology and links between physiology, morphology, and life history in fishes. Dr. Bigman conducts research on climate-mediated changes in Pacific cod spawning habitat and phenology in the Bering Sea.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker at jennifer.bigman@noaa.gov. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title: Using IMPLAN to Create Regional Input-Output models for Recreational and Commercial fisheries
Presenter(s): Sabrina Lovell, Office of Science and Technology, NMFS and Scott Steinback, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, NMFS
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: GoToWebinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Using IMPLAN to Create Regional Input-Output models for Recreational and Commercial fisheries

Presenter(s):
Sabrina Lovell, Economist, Office of Science and Technology, NMFS and Scott Steinback, Economist, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, NMFS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library and Performance, Risks, and Social Science Office (PRSSO)Seminar Contacts: Jennifer Zhuang (jennifer.zhuang@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8270588455119407886

Abstract: Understanding and estimating the economic impacts of policies related to commercial and recreational fisheries is required by law under the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. To fulfill this requirement, economists at NOAA Fisheries develop custom regional input-output models for use in analyzing the baseline economic contributions from commercial and recreational fisheries, and the economic impacts resulting from proposed or actual policy changes. In this webinar, NOAA Fisheries economists will describe the process of creating the models using IMPLAN software with examples from both commercial and recreational fisheries.

Bio(s):
Dr. Lovell is an economist with the Office of Science and Technology, NMFS, in Silver Spring, MD. Her work focuses on economic analysis of recreational marine fisheries and survey design and implementation. She has been leading NMFS's nationwide recreational angler expenditure surveys since 2008 and is co-author of a number of reports and publications on the economic contributions of angler expenditures as well as analysis of angler preferences.Scott Steinback is an economist with the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA. Scott's research primarily focuses on developing economic impact and benefit/cost modeling approaches for application to commercial and recreational fisheries management issues in the Northeast and across the country. Scott constructed the first regional input-output model employed by NMFS and the approach continues to be used to assess regional shore-side impacts of proposed commercial fishing management policies.


Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
A recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: AUV Orpheus - enabling new exploration and new questions in the deep ocean and beyond
Presenter(s): Dr. Timothy Shank, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Casey Machado, Mechanical Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore, Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: AUV Orpheus - enabling new exploration and new questions in the deep ocean and beyond.
Part of the OECI Webinar Series

Presenter(s): Dr. Timothy Shank (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) and Casey Machado (Mechanical Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution). Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute (OECI)

Seminar Contacts: Aurora Elmore (Aurora.Elmore@noaa.gov) and Joanne Flanders (Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://web.uri.edu/oeci/events/nsss

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: TBA


Bio(s): Dr. Timothy Shank (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), Casey Machado (Mechanical Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) and Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings will be available at https://web.uri.edu/oeci/news-and-events/https://web.uri.edu/oeci/news-and-events/ after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title:
New
Oyster Aquaculture Gear as Fish Habitat
Presenter(s): Julie Rose, Ph.D., Research Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries NEFSC Milford Laboratory and Renee Mercaldo-Allen, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries NEFSC Milford Laboratory
Date & Time: 17 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Oyster Aquaculture Gear as Fish Habitat
Part of the NOAA Aquaculture Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Julie Rose, Ph.D., Research Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries NEFSC Milford Laboratory & Renee Mercaldo-Allen, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries NEFSC Milford Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Office of Aquaculture

Seminar Contact(s):
Randie.Hovatter@noaa.gov, Communications Specialist, NOAA Office of Aquaculture

Remote Access:
Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7621557736495190031

Accessibility:
To request closed captions, please contact Randie Hovatter (randie.hovatter@noaa.gov) at least two days in advance of the webinar.

Abstract:
Coming soon.

Bio(s):
Coming soon.

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
Slides and a recording of the webinar will be shared with all registrants after the webinar.

Recordings:
Supply information about availability of seminar recordings, if they are going to be posted.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your suggestions and ideas!
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18 November 2021

Title: The use of cleanerfish in salmonid farming: why not transfer this environmentally-friendly technology to boost domestic seafood production?
Presenter(s): Elizabeth Fairchild Ph.D. Research Associate Professor University of New Hampshire - Department of Biological Sciences & School of Marine Sciences and Ocean Engineering
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The use of cleanerfish in salmonid farming: why not transfer this environmentally-friendly technology to boost domestic seafood production?

Presenter(s):
Elizabeth Fairchild Ph.D. Research Associate Professor University of New Hampshire - Department of Biological Sciences & School of Marine Sciences and Ocean Engineering

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s):
Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 630 718
Meeting password: 2dUVtkgPX34

Join by phone
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free, Access code: 903 630 718

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBDNotice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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Title: Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) 2022 Competitions 1-2 Info Webinar Round 2
Presenter(s): Caitlin Simpson, Ariela Zycherman, Sean Bath, Genie Bey; NOAA Climate Program Office
Date & Time: 18 November 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) 2022 Competitions 1 & 2 Informational Webinar Round 2

Presenter(s):
Caitlin Simpson, Ariela Zycherman, Sean Bath, Genie Bey (NOAA Climate Program Office)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Climate Program Office / Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program

Seminar Contact(s):
Genie Bey, Genie.Bey@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Hosted on GoToWebinar. You must register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3332996194751874319.

Accessibility:
A transcript will be provided along with the recording. If there are additional requests contact Genie Bey, Genie.Bey@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
CPO's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program will host a second webinar for competitions 1 & 2 to dive deeper into proposal questions after reviewing Letters of Intent.
In competitions 1 and 2, the RISA program is soliciting applications to support up to one full RISA team to conduct research and engagement in each of the regions mentioned below. In Competition 1, the program is accepting applications for regions currently covered by the RISA Network"West and Southwest. In competition 2, the program is accepting applications for regions new to the RISA network"U.S. Caribbean and Central Midwest. A maximum of one RISA team will be funded per region. With each team, we are aiming to build on-the-ground expertise, capacity, and trust-building within the specified region. The following are the regions being competed:
  • West: California, Nevada
  • Southwest: Arizona, New Mexico
  • U.S. Caribbean: Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands
  • Central Midwest: Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska
This webinar covers advanced questions in competitions 1 & 2, including the anatomy and structure of a RISA team. Program managers will again be available to answer questions from the attendees. This webinar is for applicants that have already reviewed the resources below. More information: https://cpo.noaa.gov/Funding-Opportunities/RISA-FY2022-Notice-of-Funding-Opportunity Direct links to information sources include:Notice of Funding Opportunity (pdf)Information Sheet (pdf)RISA Competition FAQCommon Characteristics of RISA Teams

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials:
The webinar will be recorded and posted with a transcript on GoToStage. The recording links and slides will be posted on the Climate Program Office website.Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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30 November 2021

Title: Seasonal Outlook and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Forecast
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 30 November 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Seasonal Outlook and El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Forecast

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University,
Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s):
Ellen Mecray

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of November conditions and Michelle L'Heureux will showcase her work with the El Nino/La Nina forecast for 2021-22 and the CPC seasonal outlook for winter.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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Title: Counting yelloweye rockfish eggs from my couch and other reproductive findings from Prince William Sound and the northern Gulf of Alaska
Presenter(s): Donnie Arthur, Alaska Dept of Fish and Game and Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks CFOS
Date & Time: 30 November 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Counting yelloweye rockfish eggs from my couch and other reproductive findings from Prince William Sound and the northern Gulf of Alaska

Presenter(s): Donnie Arthur, Alaska Dept of Fish and Game and Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks CFOS

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mc81d763fdf4f4a8999be883c6d0d1e65Webex meeting number: 199766 3805 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code:199766 3805

Abstract: coming soon

Bio(s): coming soon

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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1 December 2021

Title:
New
Changing spring phenology in the Gulf of Alaska and implications for fish and fisheries
Presenter(s): Lauren Rogers, PhD, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 1 December 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Changing spring phenology in the Gulf of Alaska and implications for fish and fisheries

Presenter(s): Lauren Rogers, PhD, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Post Doctoral Researcher Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: Changing spring phenology in the Gulf of Alaska and implications for fish and fisheries. How tracking changes in the timing of early life stages of fishes can inform climate-ready fisheries management.

Bio(s): Dr. Lauren Rogers is a quantitative ecologist with a background in fisheries science. I am interested in how fish and their ecosystems are affected by changes in climate, and in determining which features of ecosystems make them resilient to increasing human pressures. Much of my research is focused on understanding the drivers behind short and long-term fluctuations in the abundance of harvested fish species, the role of portfolio effects in ecology, and the causes and consequences of population spatial structure. I use statistical modeling extensively in my research. Prior to joining NOAA, I was a fisheries ecologist at the Natural Capital Project (Stanford University) and a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Oslo. I received a Ph.D. in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences from the University of Washington and a B.S. in Earth Systems Science from Stanford University. A brief bio can be found here, https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/scientist/dr-lauren-rogers

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker at lauren.rogers@noaa.gov. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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2 December 2021

Title: Gina k’aadang.nga gii uu tll k’anguudang: Seeking Wise Counsel - Good people working together, drawing on many ways of knowing to govern Haida Gwaii
Presenter(s): Lynn Lee & Niisii Guujaww Gwaii Haanas, National Park Reserve
Date & Time: 2 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Gina k'aadang.nga gii uu tll k'anguudang: Seeking Wise Counsel - Good people working together, drawing on many ways of knowing to govern Haida Gwaii

Presenter(s): Lynn Lee & Niisii Guujaww Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Remote Access:
Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 630 718
Meeting password: 2dUVtkgPX34

Join by phone
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free, Access code: 903 630 718

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBDNotice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)



Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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7 December 2021

Title: The power of participation and collaboration: An Alaska groundfish success story
Presenter(s): Jane DiCosimo, NOAA/NMFS Office of Science and Technology, retired
Date & Time: 7 December 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The power of participation and collaboration: An Alaska groundfish success story

Presenter(s): Jane DiCosimo, NOAA/NMFS Office of Science and Technology, retired

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAA NMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mc81d763fdf4f4a8999be883c6d0d1e65Webex meeting number: 199766 3805 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code:199766 3805

Abstract: coming soon

Bio(s): coming soon

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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8 December 2021

Title:
New
Evolution of the Cold Pool in the Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno, PhD, Physical Oceanographer at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab
Date & Time: 8 December 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Evolution of the Cold Pool in the Bering Sea

Presenter(s): Phyllis Stabeno, PhD, Physical Oceanographer at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab

Sponsor(s): This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Since Oct 21, 1986, the seminar has provided an opportunity for research scientists and practitioners to meet, present, develop their ideas and provoke conversations on subjects pertaining to fisheries-oceanography or regional issues in Alaska's marine ecosystems, including the US Arctic. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Seminar Contact(s): EcoFOCI Research Coordinator Heather Tabisola (heather.tabisola@noaa.gov) and EcoFOCI Post Doctoral Researcher Jens Nielsen (jens.nielsen@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101

Accessibility:

Abstract: Evolution of the Cold Pool in the Bering Sea: Integrating moorings, models, and new observing technologies to assess the evolution of the cold pool (https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/feature-story/scientific-teams-set-out-track-unprecedented-changes-eastern-bering-sea).

Bio(s): Dr. Phyllis Stabeno is a physical oceanographer at the NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, Washington. Together with Dr. Janet Duffy-Anderson, she is co-leader of NOAA's Ecosystems and Fisheries Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (EcoFOCI). For the past 30 years, she has worked on physical oceanographic, climate and ecosystem projects focused on Alaska's marine ecosystem including the Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea, Aleutian Islands and most recently, the Chukchi Sea. She is the lead investigator in maintaining a biophysical mooring array in the Bering Sea, including the M2 mooring now deployed for the 22 year. She recently completed as a Principle Investigator for the North Pacific Research Board sponsored Bering Sea Integrated Ecosystem Research Plan (BSIERP) project and NSF Bering Ecosystem Study (BEST), which won a 2015 NOAA Gold Medal Award. A brief bio can be found here: https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/scientist/dr-phyllis-stabeno

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Presentation slides may be requested directly from the speaker at phyllis.stabeno@noaa.gov. This presentation may be recorded and if so, available on the NOAA PMEL YouTube Channel.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' in the subject or body of the email. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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9 December 2021

Title: Reviving Salmon Traps for Selective Commercial Fishing
Presenter(s): Adrian Tuohy, M.S., Biologist, Project Manager Wild Fish Conservancy
Date & Time: 9 December 2021
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Reviving Salmon Traps for Selective Commercial Fishing

Presenter(s): Adrian Tuohy, M.S., Biologist, Project Manager Wild Fish Conservancy

Sponsor(s): NWFSC's Monster Seminar Jam series

Seminar Contact(s): Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 903 630 718
Meeting password: 2dUVtkgPX34

Join by phone
1-415-527-5035 U.S. Toll Free, Access code: 903 630 718

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBDNotice: Please note that the Webex service allows audio and other information sent during the session to be recorded, which may be discoverable in a legal matter and will be made publicly available. Participants and public commenters should not provide personal information during this meeting. By joining a recorded Monster Jam session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, please do not join the session. (NOAA Privacy Act Statement for Webinars and Conferences)


Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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14 December 2021

Title: The Maine-New Hampshire inshore trawl survey: We catch more than lobster
Presenter(s): Rebecca Peters, MEDMR
Date & Time: 14 December 2021
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: The Maine-New Hampshire inshore trawl survey: We catch more than lobster

Presenter(s): Rebecca Peters, MEDMR

Sponsor(s): NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar SeriesSeminar Contacts: Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov (NOAANMFS AFSC RACEGAP)

Remote Access: Join by computer at: https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=mc81d763fdf4f4a8999be883c6d0d1e65Webex meeting number: 199766 3805 Meeting Password: groundfishOr by phone: 1(415) 527-5035 Access code:199766 3805

Abstract: coming soon

Bio(s): coming soon

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Slides and a recording will be available after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!
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15 December 2021

Title: Volcanoes under the sea and exploring the 53% of US waters that remain unmapped
Presenter(s): Dr. Paula Bontempi, Dean, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island; Dr. Adam Soule, Director of OECI, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography; and Coralie Rodriguez, PhD student, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography. Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore, Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration
Date & Time: 15 December 2021
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Volcanoes under the sea and exploring the 53% of US waters that remain unmapped (presented LIVE from aboard the E/V Nautilus)
Part of the OECI Webinar Series
.

Presenter(s): Dr. Paula Bontempi (Dean, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island); Dr. Adam Soule (Director of OECI, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography); and Coralie Rodriguez (PhD student, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography). Hosted by Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Sponsor(s): NOAA Ocean Exploration and Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute (OECI)

Seminar Contacts: Aurora Elmore (Aurora.Elmore@noaa.gov) and Joanne Flanders (Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov)

Remote Access: https://web.uri.edu/oeci/events/nsss

Accessibility: Closed Captioning will be provided.

Abstract: TBA


Bio(s): Dr. Paula Bontempi (Dean, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island), Dr. Adam Soule (Director of OECI, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography), Coralie Rodriguez (PhD student, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography), and Dr. Aurora Elmore (Cooperative Institute Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration).

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: Recordings will be available at https://web.uri.edu/oeci/news-and-events/https://web.uri.edu/oeci/news-and-events/ after the webinar.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

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16 December 2021

Title: Using the National Water Model at the Northeast River Forecast Center
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and Jason Elliott, NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center
Date & Time: 16 December 2021
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Using the National Water Model at the NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University,
Jason Elliott, NOAA/NWS/Northeast River Forecast Center


Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services.

Seminar Contact(s):
Ellen Mecray

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:
The webinar will feature a recap of December conditions and Jason Elliott will show the new National Water Model and its use at the NE River Forecast Center.

Bio(s): TBD

Slides, Recordings, Other Materials: If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the NOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. We welcome your comments and ideas!

Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Describing changes to life stage specific habitat area and niche overlap between Atlantic cod and haddock on the U.S. northeast shelf
Presenter(s): Ryan Morse, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 16 December 2021
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Shifting species and climate adaptation pathways for Northeast U. S. fishing communities.

Presenter(s): Ryan Morse, NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s): U.S. Northeast Climate-Fisheries Seminar Series; coordinator is
Vincent.Saba@noaa.gov

Remote Access: Register via Google meet at: https://meet.google.com/paw-jhrb-nzr

Abstract: TBD

Bio(s): TBD

Subscribe to the NOAA Science Seminar Series weekly e-mail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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