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Past Seminars

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

During the COVID-19 Pandemic:
Until further notice, all OneNOAA seminars will be presented via remote access only. This will be true even if the seminar was originally listed with a physical location. If you have questions about attending a specific seminar, please reach out to the Seminar Contact listed in the seminar's calendar entry.

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

• Seminar submission guidelines

14 July 2020

Title: Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center, SE Regional Forecast Center
Date & Time: 14 July 2020
10:00 am - 10:45 am ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Climate Overview, Sandra Rayne, Southeast Regional Climate Center

Water Resources Overview, SE Regional Forecast Center

Extreme Heat, TBD

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NCEI, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), National Weather Service, Southeast Regional Climate Center, American Association of State Climatologists

Seminar Contact: Meredith Muth (Meredith.muth@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/1287144793876293389

Abstract:

Join us for the Southeast Climate Monthly Webinar! These webinars will provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing climate conditions such as drought, floods and tropical storms, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers may also discuss the impacts of these conditions on topics such as wildfires, agriculture production, disruption to water supply, and ecosystems.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Working to Provide an Integrated Digital Understanding of Our Earth Environment to Meet NOAA and the World's Needs
Presenter(s): Stephen Volz PhD, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services
Date & Time: 14 July 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
All NOAA Science Seminars are open to anyone, in or outside of NOAA.

Title:
Working to Provide an Integrated Digital Understanding of Our Earth Environment to Meet NOAA and the World's Needs, Seminar 7 in the NOAA Environmental Leadership Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Stephen Volz PhD, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services

Sponsor(s):
2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. See upcoming and past NOAA Leadership seminars here:
https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Seminar Points of Contact for questions: For questions about the seminars, contact
Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov , katie.rowley@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/volz/event/registration.html
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address. Before logging in, you should test your ability to use Adobe Connect (and download the software) at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets. Questions will be addressed in the Q&A window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible here. Adobe Connect questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov


Abstract:
NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS) provides secure and timely access to global environmental data to both promote and protect the Nation's environment, security, economy and quality of life. Within just the past couple years a new generation of environmental satellites have become operational. The seminar will outline how these new satellites and data management capabilities allow NESDIS to meet the growing needs for environmental information in our rapidly changing global environment.

Bio(s):
Dr. Volz has more than 30 years of professional experience in aerospace. As the head of NESDIS, he sets the strategic vision and implementation objectives for the Nation's civilian operational earth observing satellite fleet. Within NOAA he serves as the Co-Chair of the NOAA Observing Systems Council and is a member of the NOAA Executive Council. He is a leader in the international Earth observation community, serving as the NOAA Principal to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and to the Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS). He has also served as the NOAA and US Principal to the Executive Committee (ExCom) of the international Group on Earth Observations (GEO). In each of these roles Dr. Volz leads efforts to coordinate global satellite-based observations among international space agency partners and interested users of remote sensing earth observation data to further the development of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, and to meet the global weather and environmental monitoring and forecasting efforts.Prior to coming to NOAA, Dr. Volz worked at NASA Headquarters in the Earth Science Division, and at the Goddard Space Flight Center in satellite design, development, test and operations, including work on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), among others. Dr. Volz worked in industry at Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation from 1997"2002, where he was the Project Manager for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility superfluid helium cryostat and other flight projects.Dr. Volz has doctorate and master degrees in Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a bachelor's in Physics from the University of Virginia.https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/stephen_volz_bio-1-6-2020.pdf

Are our seminars recorded? Yes. When available these will be posted here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

15 July 2020

Title: Out of sight, out of notebook: Seabird bycatch loss in pelagic longline fisheries
Presenter(s): Can Zhou, PhD, Visiting Researcher, Texas A&M University
Date & Time: 15 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Out of sight, out of notebook: Seabird bycatch loss in pelagic longline fisheries

Presenter(s):
Can Zhou, PhD, Visiting Researcher, Texas A&M University

Co-Authors:
Nigel Brothers, Marine Ecology and Technology Consultant, Australia
Joan Browder, NOAA's Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Protected Resources & Biodiversity Div.
Yan Jiao, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/seabirdbycatch/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
The incidental mortality of seabirds in fisheries ranks as the greatest threat impacting seabirds globally. However, its impact on seabird populations may have been substantially underestimated due to lost, undetected bycatch. To estimate the full extent of the bycatch problem, knowledge about the magnitude and the variability of the lost bycatch is necessary. Based on a long-term dataset, this study aims to facilitate the loss-corrected bycatch estimates for pelagic longline fisheries that do not have a concurrent bycatch loss observation component. Results show strong species effect in bycatch loss rate. Estimates of the species-specific bycatch loss rate shows large variations, and for some species, the loss can well exceed the average loss rate. Seabird bycatch loss cannot be further ignored in assessing the fishery impact on seabird populations. To gauge the full scale of seabird bycatch, it is critical to account for this lost bycatch in bycatch assessments, at minimum, using the average loss rate with the ultimate goal of species-specific loss-corrected assessments.

Bio(s):
Can Zhou received his PhD from the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at Texas A&M University, College Station. After that, he joined the lab of remote sensing & information technology at the Chinese Academy of Fisheries Sciences as an assistant researcher. Meanwhile, he served on the section on marine birds and mammals of the North Pacific Marine Science Organization. He then started a post-doc position at Virginia Tech. During that time, he became interested in seabird bycatch issue and participated in seabird bycatch assessments of the US North Atlantic pelagic longline fishery. As a modeler, Can uses mathematical tools to study underlying processes. From ecological population dynamics to community regulation, he is broadly interested in analyzing ecological processes across all assembly levels.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: FogViewer – A Next Generation Marine Visibility Sensor
Presenter(s): Amanda Steck, Areté Associates
Date & Time: 15 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov, and Tiffany House, tiffany.house@noaa.gov

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2551620549982173199

Presenter(s):
Amanda Steck, Areté Associates, Data Scientist

Abstract:
Reduced visibility conditions in maritime environments increase risk to human life and property. Arete's innovative FogViewer system is an innovative passive sensor suite that aims to provide visibility measurements from a system which is simpler and less expensive to deploy and maintain in port systems.

Key Takeaways:
1. Using passive sensors, we are able to accurately provide visibility measurements

2. Passive sensors mean low power and low cost

3. FogViewer is planned to be deployed in Maritime environments and will provide a plug-in replacement for existing visibility sensors.


Bio(s):
Ms. Steck joined Areté Associates in 2019 and focuses primarily on computer vision and image processing for machine learning applications. Prior to joining Areté Associates, she worked on particle physics research, including detector R&D for the LHC and atmospheric model simulations for IceCube.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Recent Advances in Water Vapor Products from Satellites for Forecasters
Presenter(s): John Forsythe, Colorado State University
Date & Time: 15 July 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see description),
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John Forsythe
Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere
Colorado State University

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

Seminar contact: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://uaf-accap.org/event/vaws_july2020/

Abstract:

Forecasters routinely monitor total precipitable water (TPW) in the atmosphere via the NOAA operational blended TPW product. A new Advected Layer Precipitable Water (ALPW) product provides a vertical dimension and depicts long-fetch flows of moisture which enhance flood events. How these products are generated will be explained, and typical forecast uses including in the Alaska region will be presented. Upcoming improvements to these products will be discussed.

Recordings:
You can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Jill Heinerth: Cave Diving in Channel Island National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Hannah MacDonald, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Jill Heinerth
Date & Time: 15 July 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Hannah MacDonald, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Jill Heinerth

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: hannah.macdonald@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Join Jill Heinerth, one of the world's premiere underwater explorers, as she recounts her experiences cave diving in national marine sanctuaries. During this live interaction, you will hear from Jill about her diving in caves in Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, what it takes to become a cave diver, and what it is like to explore the “veins of Mother Earth.” Learn more about Jill before the live interaction by watching her featured in Stories from the Blue.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Live Interaction Series:
https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/live/watch.html

Recordings:
Yes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwKFsJZmdxpHC9veUEL_gwk8b1BtS_lXP

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

16 July 2020

Title: NOAA 2020 Nationwide Spatial Prioritization Study
Presenter(s): Karen Gouws, GIS Specialist, NOAA's National Ocean Service Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Office, Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 16 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
NOAA 2020 Nationwide Spatial Prioritization Study
Webinar No.2 in NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Karen Gouws, GIS Specialist, NOAA's National Ocean Service Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Office, Silver Spring, MD

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's IOCM Webinar Series and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Seminar Coordinators/Contacts: Amber.Butler@noaa.gov and Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/gouws/event/.registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, by visiting: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer,so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
This seminar will describe the purpose and rollout of the NOAA 2020 Spatial Prioritization Study, a study conducted across NOAA offices and programs to gather information about where different offices have mapping needs and priorities. The results of this study, in conjunction with the National Ocean Mapping, Exploration and Characterization Strategy, will shine a light on overlapping and unique mapping priorities in ocean (nearshore and offshore) regions and the Great Lakes so that resources can be allocated efficiently. Other goals include providing a means for participants to be able to reach out to others for coordination and funding assistance where there is a shared mapping need between organizations.Participants entered their office's mapping priorities in the spring and summer of 2020 withan easy-to-use online geospatial tool developed by NCCOS. These results will later be combined and analyzed using statistical tools to identify areas of greatest mapping need, and areas where there can be increased coordination between offices. In the coming months, the study will be rolled out to other federal agencies, and later non-federal partners such as local governments and private stakeholders, in order to increase mapping coordination and encourage shared funding opportunities.

Bio(s):
Karen Gouws works as a GIS Specialist at NOAA's National Ocean Service, Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) office in Silver Spring, MD. Karen contracts with Earth Resources Technology (ERT) and went to school at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science and a minor in Geography.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: Invasion and restoration at Palmyra Atoll: benthic dynamics associated with the invasive corallimorph, Rhodactis howesii
Presenter(s): Amanda Carter, Congressional Affairs Fellow for NOAA Office of Atmospheric Research - OAR
Date & Time: 16 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Amanda Carter, Congressional Affairs Fellow for NOAA Research

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library. POC: Knauss Fellow Hollis Jones (hollis.jones@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Knauss Fellows Seminar Series: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7762577768086995714 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
Few studies have documented the spatial and temporal dynamics of highly invasive species in coral reef benthic communities. In this presentation, we will discuss how we quantified the ecological dynamics of invasion by a corallimorph, Rhodactis howesii, at Palmyra Atoll in the central Pacific. We examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of this invasion, and its impact on the benthic community, using a combination of permanent photoquadrats and large-scale photomosaic imagery. Additionally, clearing plots were established and coral fragments were transplanted to provide the basis for a long-term restoration experiment on a reef undergoing invasion.

About the speaker: Amanda has a Masters and Ph.D. from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, CA. Her graduate research focused on global and local stressors on coral reefs, and their impacts on the spatial, chemical, and microbial ecology of the benthic community. She was fortunate enough to spend the last 8 years working at Palmyra Atoll, one of her favorite places to dive.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title:
New
Storytelling Series with the Knauss Fellows
Presenter(s): 2020 Knauss Fellows
Date & Time: 16 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY, NOAA - HQ - Science Seminar Series
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov, and 2020 Knauss Fellow POC: Michael Acquafredda (michael.acquafredda@noaa.gov),

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/733178947884093707

Join us online for a modified PechaKucha (Japanese) storytelling event by the Knauss Fellows class of 2020! Five Knauss Fellows will present 7 minute presentations with a brief 3 minute question and answer break in-between speakers. Topics and speakers are as follows:
  • Lauren Bonatakis, Electronic Technologies Coordinator, NOAA NMFS Office of Science and Technology


    • Title:
      In search of the elusive: A method for reaching remote and rural fishermen
  • Rachel Hager, Communications Specialist, NOAA NMFS Office of Protected Resources


    • Title:
      Utah's Wetlands: Keeping wetlands wet in one of the US's driest states
  • Connor Fagan, Science, Communications, and Policy Analyst, Marine Mammal Commission


    • Title:
      From Whales to Wolves: Management Lessons from Protecting Controversial, Keystone Species
  • Tiffany Atkinson, Special Assistant to the Assistant Administrator, OAR Front Office


    • Title:
      Living in a Haze: Stressors, sensory systems, and sexual selection
  • Amanda Dwyer, Marine Debris Specialist, NOS/Marine Debris Program


    • Title:
      Coral Reef Health in Bocas del Toro, Panama: The good, the bad, and the surprises


Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 16 July 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

TBD

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service

Seminar Contacts: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7528179497868100876

Abstract:

The focus area for this webinar is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña.

Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an e-mail to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button
Title:
New
Exploration of Strange "Off-Ridge" Seamounts in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
Presenter(s): Dr. Christopher Kelley, University of Hawai'i
Date & Time: 16 July 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Christopher Kelley, University of Hawai'i

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4534226931535856396

Abstract:
Join Dr. Christopher Kelley as he discusses the 2018 Exploration Vessel Nautilus expedition to Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument where they explored 10 unusual seamounts located north of the Hawaiian Ridge. The origin of these seamounts is enigmatic since they form a line parallel to, but well north of the islands, atolls, banks, and seamounts created when the Pacific Plate moved over the Hawaiian hotspot. Figuring out how and when they formed, as well as what sea creatures live there were the objectives of the project. Both multibeam mapping and ROV dives were conducted during the cruise that yielded high resolution images of the seamounts, rock samples for Ar/Ar dating and chemical analyses, biological specimens of potential new species, and high resolution video of their geology and biological communities. An update on the process of analyzing these samples/specimens and video will be provided, as well as a preview of a follow up cruise by the Nautilus currently being planned for 2021.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

17 July 2020

Title: July 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 17 July 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team
Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
http://accap.adobeconnect.com/nws_july2020/event/registration.html

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See OneNOAA Science Seminar Series for more.
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

20 July 2020

Title:
New
Assimilating JPSS SST and surface chl-a estimates into an ocean model of the California Current
Presenter(s): Chris Edwards, Professor of Ocean Sciences, University of California - Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 20 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Science Seminar

Seminar Contact: Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Presenter(s):


Chris Edwards
Professor of Ocean Sciences

University of California - Santa Cruz

Remote Participation

Description:877-401-9225
passcode: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mbc6b7ca0fb37db2660864e3e4943e0bb Meeting password:Jpss2020!

Abstract
In ocean data assimilation, observations are used to formally constrain ocean models to better match data. While data assimilation of physical fields such as ocean circulation is quite mature and routinely performed by many research groups and operational centers, biogeochemical data assimilation is less mature owing to more limited data and different error statistics of the fields. Review the ongoing efforts to produce estimates of the biogeochemical ocean state in the waters off the U.S. west coast using a 4-dimensional variational approach to assimilate satellite chlorophyll in combination with a host of remotely sensed and in situ physical measurements. Discuss technical efforts to simplify necessary code generation and discuss metrics that quantify the impact of individual observations on ocean state estimates.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:

Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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21 July 2020

Title:
New
Ocean acidification risks and solutions for economically and ecologically sensitive calcifiers
Presenter(s): Nina Bednarsek, PhD, Biogeochemistry Department, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Authority - SCCWRP, Costa Mesa CA
Date & Time: 21 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Ocean acidification risks and solutions for economically and ecologically sensitive calcifiers
Seminar No.8 in NOAA's Stressed out by Ocean Acidification Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Nina Bednarsek, PhD, Biogeochemistry Department, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Authority (SCCWRP), Costa Mesa CA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Center for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), and NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series. Contacts are Beth.Turner@noaa.gov, Erica.Ombres@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/bednarsek/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
Ocean acidification (OA), in combination with the other stressors, is projected to have profound impacts on ecologically and economically important marine calcifiers and resources. Assessments of OA-related ecological risks and solutions can be substantially enhanced through integrating multi-faceted approaches that integrate at least four components: lab experiments, physical-chemical observations and biogeochemical models as well as synthesis work. Dr. Bednarsek will present complementary approaches related to evaluating current and future OA risks on various calcifiers, ranging from pteropods, Dungeness crabs and oysters, echinoderms and decapods in the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) and Salish Sea estuary under current and near-future OA conditions. This experimental work, including multiple stressors and variable OA conditions, supported by the use of biological markers and indicators, is used to validate field observations that show negative biological effects under current OA conditions. This is further supported by the synthesis work related to derived OA thresholds based on the expert consensus, in combination with biogeochemical modelling. OA thresholds describe the sensitivity related to the duration and the magnitude of exposure and varies among life-stages occupying different spatial and vertical habitats. Dr. Bednarsek will demonstrate that the conditions for some of the pelagic and benthic calcifiers in various life stages are already below their sublethal and lethal biological thresholds in the CCE. The estuarine conditions in the Salish Sea with prolonged exposure further enhance the negatively impacted, and count as one of the most vulnerable habitats. Such habitat evaluations are needed for developing OA mitigation and adaptation efforts, such as the use of marine vegetation and management of local nutrient loadings. A few examples of potential habitat refugia against ocean acidification for marine calcifiers will be discussed.

Bio(s):
Dr. Nina Bednarsek is a Senior Scientist in the Biogeochemistry Department at the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Authority (SCCWRP). She studies the interactions between ecologically and economically important marine calcifying species and oceanographic processes and drivers that are associated with climate change, including ocean acidification, warming, marine heat waves, and deoxygenation. She also specializes in the development of biologically relevant thresholds for interpreting ocean acidification data and the impacts on pelagic calcifiers known as pteropods. Her research efforts focus on determining biological thresholds for a variety of organisms in the California Current System, as well as the estuarine regime of the Salish Sea, and up to the Arctic.

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22 July 2020

Title: The challenges of managing blue crabs in Chesapeake Bay – life cycle and fishery
Presenter(s): Glenn Davis, Natural Resources Biologist, Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Date & Time: 22 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The challenges of managing blue crabs in Chesapeake Bay - life cycle and fishery

Presenter(s):
Glenn Davis, Natural Resources Biologist, Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/bluecrab/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
The management of blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, in Chesapeake Bay took a dramatic change of course in Fall, 2008.It has been largely successful, but it took 15 years to implement. When a decline in the population of blue crabs was first started observed in the mid-1990s, standard management actions - size limits, effort reduction, etc. - were put in place in a piecemeal fashion by each jurisdiction without much effect.The hydrologic and biotic characteristics of the Chesapeake Bay, which make it the world's most productive estuary for blue crabs, create a spatial and temporal partitioning of sizes and sexes. The life cycle of the blue crab, tailored to estuaries, and how the fishery and industry developed in response to the geographic differences in blue crab distribution were challenges that needed to be overcome.

Bio(s):
Glenn Davis is a biologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. He is also the current chair of the Chesapeake Bay Stock Assessment Committee. He began working with blue crabs 32 years ago, at the inception of the Bay-wide blue crab winter dredge survey. He has been involved with numerous fishery-independent and fishery-dependent research and monitoring studies focusing on blue crabs.

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23 July 2020

Title: Effects of nitrogen sources and plankton food-web dynamics on habitat quality for the larvae of Atlantic bluefin tuna in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Michael Stukel, PhD, Associate Professor, Florida State University
Date & Time: 23 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Effects of nitrogen sources and plankton food-web dynamics on habitat quality for the larvae of Atlantic bluefin tuna in the Gulf of Mexico
Seminar No. 6 of 13 in NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series: Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s):
Dr. Michael Stukel, Associate Professor, Florida State University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact are Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/plankton/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
Bluefin tuna spawn in some of the most oligotrophic regions of the Gulf of Mexico. In these stratified, low nutrient waters, low abundances of their mesozooplankton prey can lead to high starvation rates among Bluefin larvae and commensurately decreased recruitment. Larval prey availability may become an even greater concern for this species in a future ocean in which warmer temperatures simultaneously drive decreased ecosystem productivity through increased stratification and increased food requirements as a result of higher metabolism. To investigate linkages between physical circulation, the lower trophic level food web, and larval Bluefin, we have pursued two complementary modeling approaches: three-dimensional coupled ecosystem modeling and mass-balanced constrained food web modeling. In the first approach, we have developed a three-dimensional ecosystem model from nutrients to large and predatory mesozooplankton, and validated the model against SEAMAP zooplankton abundance measurements and in situ zooplankton rate measurements. We then developed a Lagrangian larval tuna model to advect simulated larvae through the dynamic prey field to quantify growth, starvation, predation, and survivorship. We use this model to investigate processes promoting larval tuna survivorship in current and future climate conditions. With our second approach, we explicitly acknowledge that larval tuna are selective feeders on specific mesozooplankton taxa and hence have constructed a mass-balance constrained food-web model that includes much greater complexity within the zooplankton community. This food-web model is constrained using extensive (nutrients to tuna) measurements made during Lagrangian experiments conducted on two focused cruises in the Gulf of Mexico. This modeling approach allows us to trace nitrogen from upwelled nitrate and nitrogen fixation through zooplankton communities and into larval tuna. We then show how these modeling approaches can be linked to mechanistically predict the impact of interannual and longer-scale changes in the Gulf of Mexico on larval tuna recruitment.

Bio(s):
Dr. Michael Stukel is an associate professor at Florida State University. His research spans the intersection of plankton ecology and marine biogeochemistry. He has a love for all the zooplankton of the oceans and a passion for understanding how these microscopic organisms influence everything from the global climate to local fisheries yield. Appendicularians are his favorite plankton. Unless it's ctenophores. Or salps. Perhaps phaeodarians, krill, Lingulodinium polyedrum, hyperiid amphipods, Tomopteris, or pyrosomes. It might be copepods. But he doesn't like chaetognaths. They always get stuck on the filter.

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Title: New Mexico Weather Outlook Monthly Webinar
Presenter(s): Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist
Date & Time: 23 July 2020
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Speakers
Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist

Sponsor(s):
NOAA, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), USDA Southwest Climate Hub, New Mexico Climate Center, Quivira Coalition, Santa Ana Natural Resources

Seminar Contact: Joel Lisonbee (joel.lisonbee@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7590421755382798093

Abstract:

These monthly webinar presentations will provide information on current and upcoming weather and climate conditions in New Mexico, with a highlight on conditions on Tribal lands. Agricultural producers and land managers are encouraged to attend. The webinars will take place on the 4th Thursday of the next 4 months (June 25, July 23, August 27, September 24).

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

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Title: Bering Science: Spring 2020 Bering Region Ocean Update
Presenter(s): Molly McCammon, AOOS and Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 23 July 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Molly McCammon (AOOS) & Rick Thoman (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

Seminar contact: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://uaf-accap.org/event/bering-science-spring-2020-bering-region-ocean-update/

Abstract:

The Bering Sea is undergoing rapid unprecedented change. Elders across the region have reported changes in sea ice quality and timing for decades. Sea ice extent in the late winters of 2018 and 2019 were by far the lowest recorded since satellite monitoring began in 1978. And even though sea ice and air temperatures were closer to “normal” this past winter, environmental change is having profound impacts on the fish, bird and marine mammals of the Bering Sea, as well as the peoples of the region who depend on these resources.Using funds from a national Ocean Data Sharing Initiative, the Alaska Ocean Observing System is working with federal and academic partners and Bering region communities to foster greater sharing of Indigenous ocean-related observations and scientific information. We will be presenting some new data and information products, based on the needs of federal and state agency managers, coastal communities, tribes, and private industry, and invite webinar participants and other residents of western Alaska to join our conversation about their observations and their needs.Here is the Bering Science: Spring 2020 report which was written for a general audience and is intended to be the first of several reports published annually. To be included on future mailing lists, contact Jill Prewitt.Funding for this publication was provided to AOOS from a national initiative to increase sharing of ocean and coastal data. AOOS is focusing on the Bering Sea region for the initial phase of this project. More information can be found at www.beringregionoceandata.org.
Recordings:
You can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Stock SMART: NOAA Fisheries’ Stock Status, Management, Assessment, and Resource Trends Web Tool
Presenter(s): Jeffrey Vieser, ECS Federal for NOAA Fisheries, National Stock Assessment Program; Abigail Furnish, NOAA Fisheries; Kristan Blackhart, ECS Federal for NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 23 July 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library and the National Stock Assessment Workshop Seminar Series POC: kristan.blackhart@noaa.gov

Register for the webinar here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6974489635644220940


Presenter(s):
Jeffrey Vieser, ECS Federal for NOAA Fisheries, National Stock Assessment Program; Abigail Furnish, NOAA Fisheries; Kristan Blackhart, ECS Federal for NOAA Fisheries

Abstract:
NOAA Fisheries recently launched Stock SMART, a web tool providing public access to information related to Stock Status, Management, Assessment, and Resources Trends. With Stock SMART, users can access, visualize, compare, and download thousands of stock assessment results for federally managed fish stocks dating back to 2005. Future development will add information on fisheries management and status determinations. Stock SMART increases transparency, understanding, and trust in the fisheries management decision-making process by broadening awareness of the condition of fishery resources and informing discussions about sustainable management.

Key Takeaways:
  • Users can use Stock SMART to search, view, and download the results from thousands of stock assessments.
  • Stock SMART provides direct, updating links to the best scientific information available to describe the current condition of all federally managed fish stocks.


Bio(s):
Abby, Kristan, and Jeff, are part of the National Stock Assessment Program (NSAP) in the Assessment and Monitoring Division of the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology. NSAP's mission is to provide national leadership, coordination, and representation to support science-based sustainable fisheries management and advancement of the stock assessment enterprise.

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Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title:
New
Seabirds of Stellwagen Bank
Presenter(s): Wayne Petersen, Massachusetts Audubon Society
Date & Time: 23 July 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Wayne Petersen, Massachusetts Audubon Society

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6523442478248476427

Abstract:
Seabirds are among the most widely traveled and extraordinary navigators in the bird world. Find out from Wayne Petersen, Mass Audubon's Important Bird Area Program Director, how these remarkable birds are supremely adapted to spend most of their lives in some of the most remote and hostile environments on the planet. We will trace the travels of some of these amazing birds as they seasonally utilize Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, and learn what they are telling us, both about the marine environment and ourselves.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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24 July 2020

Title: NOAA Hollings Scholar Presentations: Exploration of the Hot Dry Windy Index and wildfire; Climate Change and overnight fire growth
Presenter(s): Clairisse Reiher & Emily McCutchan, 2020 Hollings Scholars
Date & Time: 24 July 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Clairisse Reiher & Emily McCutchan, 2020 Hollings Scholars

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

Seminar contact: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://uaf-accap.org/event/hollings_2020/

Abstract:

During the summer of 2020 ACCAP and the Alaska Fire Science Consortium jointly hosted two Ernest F. Hollings scholars for the summer internships. Because of COVID-19 their internships were remote. During this webinar the scholars will present their summer's work.

1. An exploration of the Hot Dry Windy Index & its applicability to the Alaska wildfire environment (Emily)
Hot, dry, and windy conditions have a well-established link to wildfire growth. The Hot-Dry-Windy Index (HDW) combines daily values of wind speed and vapor pressure deficit to provide insight into large fire growth days. This study explores trends in HDW from 1980-2019 for Alaska based on ERA5 Reanalysis data, compares daily values of HDW to MODIS fire detections for individual PSA's, and examines case studies to provide insight into HDW's utility for fire forecasting in Alaska.2. Changing Summer Nighttime Climate and its Impact on Alaska Fire Growth (Clairisse)
Growth of wildfires in Alaska is generally expected to occur with the assistance of heat and low moisture during daylight hours, while overnight low temperatures and relative humidity recoveries limit this growth. However, the progression of climatological warming in the Arctic, combined with prolonged exposure to sunlight at high latitudes during the summer, may be providing more capability for overnight fire growth than previously thought. This project makes use of historical wildfire records and ERA5-Land reanalysis data to investigate the potential of taking nighttime temperatures and relative humidity recoveries into consideration for fire weather forecasts.Recordings:
You can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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27 July 2020

Title:
New
California-Nevada Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Julie Kalansky, California Nevada Climate Applications Program, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Adrian Borsa, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Josh Sturtevant, The National Center for Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 27 July 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):

Drought & Climate Update
Julie Kalansky | California Nevada Climate Applications Program, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego

Geodetic Observations of Water Storage in the Sierra Nevada and Implications for Water Availability
Adrian Borsa | Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Water Supply Forecasting Skill is Sensitive to Changing Mountain Snowpack
Josh Sturtevant | The National Center for Atmospheric Research

Sponsor(s):
National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Scripps Institution of Oceanography, National Center for Atmospheric Research

Seminar Contact: Julie Kalansky, CNAP, jkalansky@ucsd.edu

Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8365589542814178061

Abstract:

According to the July 7 U.S. Drought Monitor, 53.6% of CA/NV is in drought, including 1.4% in Extreme Drought (D3) along the CA/OR border. It's the dry season now and most of NV and Northern CA have above normal significant fire potential, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. This webinar will provide an overview of the current conditions and outlook for the rest of summer into fall as well as discuss studies on water storage and water supply forecasting.

The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) May 2020 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña).

Recordings: You can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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28 July 2020

Title: Innovative Approaches to Integrating Research and K-12 Education to Advance Estuary Stewardship
Presenter(s): Julie Binz, ACE Basin NERR, SC; Elizabeth Edmondson, Virginia Commonwealth University. VA; Joan Muller, Waquoit Bay NERR, MA
Date & Time: 28 July 2020
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

Innovative Approaches to Integrating Research and K-12 Education toAdvance Estuary Stewardship
Panelists: Julie Binz, ACE Basin NERR, SC; Elizabeth Edmondson, Virginia CommonwealthUniversity. VA; Joan Muller, Waquoit Bay NERR, MA

Moderator: Sarah Nuss, Chesapeake Bay NERR, VA

Seminar

Sponsor(s):

NERRS Science Collaborative

Remote Access:
Please register through GoToWebinar (https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3645545558428441359).

Seminar Contact:
dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract:

Engaging youth andK-12 teachers can expand the broader impact of research and advance coastalstewardship goals. But what are the best strategies for effectively reachingthis unique audience and what innovative techniques are being tested?This panel discussionwebinar will feature four panelists with experience leading innovative projectsthat connect K-12 teachers and students with the important research andstewardship activities happening in and around National Estuarine ResearchReserves. After providing a brief glimpse into their recent projects, panelistswill discuss lessons learned and ideas for next steps. Sarah Nuss, anexperienced reserve educator, will moderate a lively discussion about timelytopics, including the partnerships and creative process that spark newprojects, broader impacts observed, adaptations to support social distancing,and ideas for research about student and teacher learning.
About the speakers:
Sarah Nuss has beenthe education coordinator at the Chesapeake Bay Reserve in Virginia since 2005.In addition to pursuing a PhD in Curriculum Learning Design, Sarah developseducation, interpretation and outreach programs for a range of audiences, andone current area of interest is professional development for graduate studentsand pre-service teachers. She has led several Science Collaborative projects,including: Climate Education for a Changing Bay Expansion and Creating anAlliance of Scientists and Educators in Virginia.Julie Binz is theeducation coordinator at ACE Basin Reserve in South Carolina where she leadsboat- and field-based experiences for a range of school and community groups.Julie has been working for many years on a unique program that helps classesgrow marsh grasses in school greenhouses and transplant the grasses into localshoreline restoration sites. Learn about her recent projects: Spreading theSeeds of Estuary Health and From Seeds to Shoreline.Elizabeth Edmondsonhelps train pre-service teachers and leads a number of research projects aspart of the School of Education at the Virginia Commonwealth University.Elizabeth will be part of a multi-university team working with the ChesapeakeBay NERR to train pre-service science teachers on how to incorporateenvironmental education into their classroom curriculum. To learn more, readElizabeth's bio.Joan Muller is theeducation coordinator at Waquoit Bay Reserve in Massachusetts where sheprovides professional development for teachers and leads school fieldtrips. Joan has partnered with a numberof researchers and found creative ways to integrate blue carbon and oysterecology into middle and high school curriculums. She's also been customizingprograms for hard to reach audiences through initiatives such as Deaf Studentson the Estuary.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminarsrequest@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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30 July 2020

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: Evaporative Demand Drought Index (EDDI)
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Mike Hobbins, NOAA/OAR/ESRL/Physical Sciences Division
Date & Time: 30 July 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required),
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Evaporative Demand Drought Index (EDDI)

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Mike Hobbins, Hydrologist, NOAA/OAR/ESRL/Physical Sciences Division.


Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:

Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

The webinar will feature a recap of July conditions and a discussion on tools used to assess drought conditions in the west and their application to the Northeast Drought Early Warning System.

Bio(s):
TBD

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Title: The Trophic Ecology and Habitat of the Endangered Gulf of Mexico Bryde’s Whale (Balaenoptera edeni)
Presenter(s): Lance P. Garrison, Research Biologist, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Protected Resources and Biodiversity Division, Miami FL
Date & Time: 30 July 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
The Trophic Ecology and Habitat of the Endangered Gulf of Mexico Bryde's Whale (Balaenoptera edeni) Seminar 7 of 13 in NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series: Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s):
Lance P. Garrison, Research Biologist, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Protected Resources and Biodiversity Division, Miami FL.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact are Andrew.Lade@noaa.gov and for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:

Register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/garrison/event/registration.html . After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
The Endangered Gulf of Mexico Bryde's Whale (GoMex Whale, Balaenoptera edeni) is a small population occupying a discrete habitat near the shelf break in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Due to its small population size, exposure to anthropogenic threats, and impacts from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill there is an urgent need to develop conservation plans to protect the population. We conducted three cruises during 2018 and 2019 and employed a variety of tools to better understand the habitat requirements and trophic ecology of the GoMex whale. We used visual and passive acoustic survey methods to characterize spatial distribution, small boat based and unmanned aerial system imagery to examine body condition and identify individual whales, and deployed animal borne tags to examine diving and feeding behavior. We quantified the distribution of potential prey using acoustic backscatter data and conducted trawl sampling to identify prey types and characterize the food web within the habitat. GoMex whales occur within a restricted depth range and are observed most frequently near the 200m isobath. Tag data indicate that during daylight hours the whales dive and execute feeding lunges near the bottom. Acoustic backscatter data indicate a concentrated layer of organisms near the bottom during daylight hours and dense near-bottom patches of small fish in areas where whales were feeding. Trawl data coupled with stable isotope analyses indicate that a small, vertically migrating fish is the primary prey of the GoMex whale and dominates these dense patches. Mesoscale circulation patterns may contribute to the high concentration of prey in the region as there is seasonal along-shelf flow of water near the shelf edge that entrains highly productive, low salinity shelf water. Ongoing work will verify these trophic linkages and examine the energetic requirements of these whales. These findings will help evaluate the availability of similar habitats, including in the Southern Gulf of Mexico, which may provide additional suitable habitat for GoMex whale population.

Bio(s):
Lance Garrison has been a researcher in the Marine Mammal Program in the Protected Resources and Biodiversity Diversity Division at the Southeast Fisheries Science Center since 2001. He received his PhD in 1997 from the College of William and Mary and has expertise in quantitative ecology, spatial statistics, line transect surveys, and population dynamics. He has worked on a wide variety of issues surrounding marine mammal stocks including characterizing habitat use and vessel strike risk in North Atlantic Right Whales, providing analytical support for the Bottlenose Dolphin and Pelagic Longline Take Reduction Teams, and collaborating on the marine mammal injury assessment associated with the Deepwater Horizon event. He is currently a co-principal investigator on a NOAA RESTORE Science Program project to examine the trophic ecology of the endangered Gulf of Mexico Bryde's whale.

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11 August 2020

Title: Comparing losses of tidal forests and tidal marsh on the Oregon coast: A paradigm shift for estuary restoration and conservation
Presenter(s): Laura Brophy, Director,Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, OR
Date & Time: 11 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Comparing losses of tidal forests and tidal marsh on the Oregon coast: A paradigm shift for estuary restoration and conservation

Presenter(s):
Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, OR

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at:https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/paradigmshift/event/registration.html After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
This groundbreaking study showed that prior to European settlement, over half of Oregon coast's tidal wetlands were forested "tidal swamps," but 95% of these tidal forests have been lost to diking, logging, development, and conversion to agricultural land uses. Today's remnants of these tidal forests contain deep, structurally-complex tidal channels that shelter young salmon on their way to the sea, providing rich food resources and protection from predators and high river flows. These tidal swamps, typically dominated by salt-tolerant Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), also store more carbon per hectare than almost any other ecosystem on earth. The near-eradication of these tidal forests has greatly impacted their provision of these and other valued wetland functions. Our study used accurate elevation-based estuary mapping methods to document the historical extent, current extent, and losses of these tidal forests on the Oregon coast, compared to emergent tidal marsh and tidal scrub-shrub wetlands. We found that historically, forested and scrub-shrub tidal wetlands (collectively called "tidal swamp") formed a majority (57.8%) of the coast's tidal wetland area, with forested wetlands strongly predominating (54.4%). Emergent tidal wetlands ("tidal marsh") occupied a smaller area (42.2%). Together, diking and vegetation conversion resulted in the loss of 95% of historical tidal forested wetlands and 96% of historical scrub-shrub tidal wetlands, compared to 59% of historical tidal marsh. One factor offset some of the losses of historical tidal marsh: the substantial gain (1770 ha) of new tidal marsh in former mudflats due to sediment accretion and low relative sea level rise (SLR). We did not find evidence of widespread erosion or drowning of tidal wetlands on the Oregon coast, suggesting that Oregon's tidal wetlands may be more resilient to SLR than some other coastal regions of the United States. The study represents a major step forward in understanding the history of the Oregon coast, and highlights the importance of protecting remaining tidal forested wetlands and restoring these habitats where appropriate. The presentation and project report include information on approaches and methods for tidal swamp restoration, and emphasize the need for further field monitoring and research to support these efforts.

Bio(s):
Laura Brophy is the Director of the Estuary Technical Group at the Institute for Applied Ecology in Corvallis,Oregon. For over 20 years, she has provided leadership in science-based decision support for estuary restoration and conservation in the Pacific Northwest andU.S. West Coast. Through her field research and her participation in collaborative groups that share the common goal of improving estuary restoration science and application, she has been central to the recent renaissance of estuary restoration planning in the West. In these collaborations, she has led the development of several heavily-used spatial mapping tools for estuary management and climate change adaptation planning.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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12 August 2020

Title:
New
Lessons Learned from a Decade of NWS Funded Social Science
Presenter(s): Anas Askar, Howard University
Date & Time: 12 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar ONLY
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

POC: NOAA Central Library, library.seminars@noaa.gov

Register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3963330808039268876

Presenter(s):
Anas Askar, MA, Howard University

Abstract:
Anas analyzed 64 National Weather Service (NWS) socio-economic reports published over the past 10-15 years to determine the common themes among NWS socio-economic research investments. While reports vary in scope, a general list of recurring themes emerged, including the importance of warning lead times, factors leading to evacuation among the general public, the importance of simple language and concise messaging, the public's ability to use NWS products, the use of color schemes, and the difference between probabilistic vs. deterministic information in product evaluation among stakeholders.

Key Takeaways: This presentation will focus on the insights gathered from analyzing NWS socio-economic contracts and highlight emerging patterns that span years of research investments. This presentation will also inform strategic planning and future socio-economic research investments for the NWS.

Bio(s):
Anas is NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology (NCAS-M) fellow and PhD Student in the Department of Sociology and Criminology at Howard University. His interests include how to best communicate risk information to the public by utilizing various social science theoretical frameworks and methods.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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13 August 2020

Title:
New
Understanding Ocean Acidification
Presenter(s): Rafael DeAmeller, NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab Leader
Date & Time: 13 August 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rafael DeAmeller, NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab Leader

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5801054542090014220

Abstract:
Data in the Classroom is designed to help teachers and students use real scientific NOAA data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional and global scale. The interactive module provides authentic research questions and scaled data interactions that give students the opportunity to explore this question (and more). In this presentation, participants will dive deep into Data in the Classroom's Ocean Acidification Module to explore the processes that cause acidification, examine data from across the globe and take a virtual tour of the new web-based curricular modules and data tools.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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21 August 2020

Title: August 2020 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, ACCAP
Date & Time: 21 August 2020
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP)

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team
POC: Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812)

Remote Access:
http://accap.adobeconnect.com/nws_august2020/event/registration.html

Abstract:

The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the coming months. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)

Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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25 August 2020

Title: Fish Predation on a Landscape Scale
Presenter(s): Cyril J. Michel, University of California, Santa Cruz/NOAA-NMFS; Mark J. Henderson - USGS/Humboldt State University; Christopher M. Loomis - Humboldt State University; Joseph M. Smith, NOAA-NMFS-NWFSC, Seattle; Nicholas J. Demetras, NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz; Ilysa S. Iglesias, NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz; Brendan M. Lehman, NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz, and David D. Huff, NOAA-NMFS NWFSC, Newport
Date & Time: 25 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Fish Predation on a Landscape Scale

Presenter(s):
Cyril J. Michel, University of California - Santa Cruz / NOAA-NMFS
Co-Authors:
Mark J. Henderson - USGS / Humboldt State University, Arcata
Christopher M. Loomis - Humboldt State University, Arcata
Joseph M. Smith - NOAA-NMFS-NWFSC, Seattle
Nicholas J. Demetras - NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz
Ilysa S. Iglesias - NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz
Brendan M. Lehman - NOAA-NMFS, Santa Cruz
David D. Huff - NOAA-NMFS NWFSC, Newport

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov. After the webinar, we will likely email the recording and PDF of slides to registrants if/when available.

Remote Access:
Please register at:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/fishpredation/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac.

Abstract:
California's Central Valley salmon populations are in decline, and it is believed that one of the major contributors to these declines is low survival during residence in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The mechanism of their mortality is unclear, but it is believed that a significant contributor is predation by the large populations of predators present there. However, it is currently not clear what proportion of juvenile salmonid mortality can be directly attributed to fish predation, largely because empirical data on predation has only been collected at limited spatial scales. In 2017, we quantified predation mortality rates, predator abundance, and relevant environmental covariates in 21 randomly selected study sites in the Delta, using a randomized selection protocol. Predation mortality rates were quantified using Predation Event Recorders (standardized predation monitoring devices), and predator densities were quantified using Dual-Identification Sonar cameras. This site selection protocol allowed for the inference of relationships between the environment and predation across a broader spatial scale than previous studies. Using these statistical relationships, we then developed the capability to produce high-resolution spatially and temporally-explicit predation risk estimates. We then put these predation risk estimates in the context of their impacts on migrating juvenile salmon, allowing us to assess the potential success of different potential survival-enhancing management actions.

Bio(s):
Cyril has spent his career to date passionately devoted to restoring salmon stocks in California's Central Valley. This work has led him through a natural progression, starting with his Master's Thesis work on investigating the outmigration survival dynamics of juvenile late-fall Chinook salmon, to present day, which consists of being the team leader for the salmon acoustic telemetry and salmon predation programs at University of California Santa Cruz, in affiliation with the National Marine Fisheries Service Southwest Fisheries Science Center. These two programs are both currently maturing and moving from the monitoring phase, in other words, assessing the spatial and temporal dynamics as well as environmental drivers of juvenile salmon survival and predation risk, to the experimental phase, with different studies testing ways to manipulate juvenile salmon survival and predation risk on a landscape scale. When Cyril isn't working tirelessly to restore salmon populations, he's secretly out (trying to) catch them on his boat and keep them for dinner.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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26 August 2020

Title: Benthic habitat mapping to meet the needs of the National Park Service: An example from Fire Island National Seashore Post-Hurricane Sandy
Presenter(s): Monique LaFrance Bartley, Marine Ecologist, National Park Service; Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch, Fort Collins, CO
Date & Time: 26 August 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only,
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Title:
Benthic habitat mapping to meet the needs of the National Park Service: An example from Fire Island National Seashore Post-Hurricane Sandy
Webinar No. 3 in NOAA's Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Webinar Series

Presenter(s):
Monique LaFrance Bartley, Marine Ecologist, National Park Service; Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch, Fort Collins, CO

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's IOCM Webinar Series and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series Webinar Coordinators/contacts are Amber.Butler@noaa.gov and Tracy.GIll@noaa.go

Remote Access:
Register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/lafrance/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, by visiting: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Audio is over the computer,so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
Hurricane Sandy made landfall along the Atlantic coast in October 2012, creating a new tidal inlet at Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) in New York. The event provided a unique research opportunity and numerous efforts were undertaken to understand the ecological and management implications of the new inlet. One such effort was benthic habitat mapping along the bay side of FIIS within Great South Bay. This presentation will discuss the acoustic and ground-truthing data acquisition and analysis used to develop benthic habitat maps that depict statistically significant relationships between macrofaunal communities and their associated environment; how the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) played a key role in developing and assessing the habitat map units; and the influence of the new inlet on benthic habitats. This study provides further understanding of biotic-abiotic relationships within FIIS and serves as a comprehensive baseline dataset, since previous data are limited. More broadly, the study demonstrates the value of benthic habitat mapping and CMECS for guiding science-based management strategies and provides an example of mapping in extremely shallow waters (<3m) in turbid environments where optical methods are not possible.The presentation will also introduce a new NPS effort to develop maps for all 88 coastal and Great Lakes parks (e.g. topobathymetry, geomorphic features, benthic habitats). The initial phase of the project involves compiling and assessing existing data within parks (e.g. LiDAR, multibeam, backscatter, sidescan, aerial imagery, ground-truthing) to identify data gaps. In addition, we would like to coordinate and collaborate with other federal agencies to acquire data where needed, as well as contribute to national mapping efforts.

Bio(s):
Monique recently joined the National Park Service as a Marine Ecologist within the Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch. Her primarily role is managing benthic mapping and sediment and shoreline management projects that serve all 88 coastal and Great Lakes parks. In addition, she provides technical expertise at the request of parks, and is responsible for implementing and managing interagency collaborations. Prior to joining NPS, Monique spent twelve years at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography, where she was a Marine Research Specialist and earned her MS and PhD in Oceanography. Her research focused on shallow water benthic habitat mapping and its real-world value to resource management, application of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS), and GIS. Her work also involved interpreting and presenting scientific information to managers, regulators, and non-scientific audiences.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information
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27 August 2020

Title: NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services: Hurricane Season Outlook 2
Presenter(s): Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center and Gerry Bell, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 27 August 2020
9:30 am - 10:30 am ET
Location: via GoToWebinar (registration required),
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:

NOAA Eastern Region Climate Services Webinar/Hurricane Season Outlook 2

Presenter(s):
Samantha Borisoff, Climatologist with the Northeast Regional Climate Center, and
Gerry Bell, NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center.


Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/National Centers for Environmental Information/Regional Climate Services; coordinator is Ellen Mecray. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the recording, see the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Remote Access:

Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either Google, IE or Edge on Windows, or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat and the Q/A windows.

Abstract:

The webinar will feature a recap of August conditions and a discussion on the analytical indicators and an outlook for the North Atlantic Hurricane Season.

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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3 September 2020

Title:
New
Using Film to Drive Social Change
Presenter(s): Tirrea Billings
Date & Time: 3 September 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tirrea Billings

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2160293366302456334

Abstract:
Five high school students undertook the adventure of a lifetime during Project Shiphunt: hunt for a shipwreck, investigate its identity, and document it in 3D for future generations. Accompanied by a team of scientists and historians from the NOAA, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and other partners, the students conducted a full-fledged research mission, as they searched the deep waters of northeastern Lake Huron. Join Tirrea Billings to learn more about this experience and how it helped shape her love for film and storytelling, her journey as an entrepreneur, and how she uses her gifts as an activist in digital spaces.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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8 September 2020

Title: Empowered to Lead: Inspiring the Next Generation of Leaders
Presenter(s): Albert 'Benjie' Spencer, Chief Engineer, Director, Engineering Standards, NOAA's National Weather Service
Date & Time: 8 September 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ Silver Spring, MD, SSMC4, Room 1W611 or via webinar - see below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Empowered to Lead: Inspiring the Next Generation of Leaders

Presenter(s):
Albert (Benjie) Spencer, Chief Engineer, Director, Engineering Standards, NOAA's National Weather Service

Sponsor(s):
2020 NOAA Environmental Leadership Seminar Series: To provide insight into NOAA's leadership in environmental science, by those who lead it and make it happen. NOAA leadership and Subject Matter Experts, and NOAA partners speak on topics relevant to NOAA's mission. Sponsored by the NOAA Research Council. See seminars here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Seminar POCs for questions: For questions about the seminars: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov, Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov, Sandra.Claar@noaa.gov, Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/spencer/event/registration.html

After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Seminars are available to the Public via webinar, and NOAA staff can attend in person or via webinar. Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link:
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Recordings: When available these will be posted here: https://libguides.library.noaa.gov/noaaenvironmentalleadershipseries

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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7 October 2020

Title: Ecosystem Modeling for Fisheries Management in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): TBD
Date & Time: 7 October 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Ecosystem Modeling for Fisheries Management in the Gulf of Mexico
Part of NOAA's RESTORE Science Program Seminar Series: Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico

Presenter(s):
Dr. David Chagaris, Assistant Professor, IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, University of Florida, and Dr. Igal Berenshtein, Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami

Sponsor(s):
NOAA RESTORE Science Program and NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series. Points of contact are Andrew.Lade@noaa.govand for webinar questions, Tracy.GIll@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at
https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/ecosystemmodeling/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use (and to download) Adobe Connect, before the webinar, at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm . Audio is over the computer,so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat box.

Abstract:
The overall goal of this project is to integrate information on ecosystem stressors and predator-prey interactions into the assessment and management of fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Two existing trophic-dynamic ecosystem models for the GoM were updated and expanded. The first is an ecosystem model of the West Florida Shelf (WFS), that focuses on reef fish species and red tides. The second model is a Gulf-wide (U.S. territorial waters) ecosystem model that focuses on federally managed species, the role of forage fish, and effects of bycatch. Both models utilize the Ecopath with Ecosim and Ecospace (EwE) modeling software package. In the WFS EwE model, a new feature was added to enable estimation of red tide mortality over space and time, while accounting for potential bloom avoidance and effects of food web impacts on recovery times. An important output from this model is a time series of red tide mortality that can be incorporated into reef fish stock assessments and can also inform projection scenarios used by managers to set annual catch limits. The Gulf-wide EwE model focuses on Gulf menhaden and generates time series of predation mortality for stock assessment and presents managers with the tradeoff between menhaden harvest and predator populations. Primary end users of these tools include stock assessment scientists, scientific advisory committees, and state and federal fisheries managers. Input from end users was obtained during an initial scoping workshop and we remained engaged with our end users by providing updates opportunistically during routine meetings. In the case of Gulf menhaden, our end user engagement efforts highlighted constraints and limitations in their management structure, impeding immediate uptake of the ecosystem information. Over the next year, we will finalize ecosystem model outputs to upcoming stock assessments and management actions for gag grouper, scamp, gray snapper, and Gulf menhaden as well as the recently initiated Gulf Fishery Ecosystem Plan.

Bio(s):
Dr. David Chagaris is a research assistant professor at the IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, University of Florida. Dr. Chagaris is a quantitative fisheries scientist that analyzes datasets and develops population dynamic and ecosystem models that incorporate environmental drivers, food web dynamics, and habitat interactions in order to understand how fisheries resources and marine ecosystems respond to fishing and environmental change. Those models are then used to improve population assessments, screen policy options for unintended consequences, evaluate ecosystem effects of natural and anthropogenic perturbations, and develop new management reference points that account for ecosystem interactions and the uncertainty therein. Dr. Chagaris is also currently a member of the Gulf Council SSC, the Gulf Council Ecosystem Technical Committee, and the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Ecological Reference Points workgroup.Dr. Igal Berenshtein is a postdoctoral research associate at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, and the NOAA Fisheries Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Dr. Berenshtein is a quantitative marine ecologist working on the broad aspects of ecological and environmental questions by integrating analytical approaches, such as biophysical modeling, behavioral experiments, empirical studies and ecosystem modeling. Igal has completed his first Postdoc at the university of Miami working on Marine pollution and larval dispersal, and he is now in his second post-doc position at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, working on ecosystem modeling in the Gulf of Mexico.Subscribe tothe OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.(David Chagaris, Professor, IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, University of Florida and Dr. Igal Berenshtein, Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami)



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22 October 2020

Title:
New
Giant Seabass: Kings of the Kelp Forest
Presenter(s): Dr. Ryan Freedman, Research Ecologist, NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 22 October 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Ryan Freedman, Research Ecologist, NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar contact: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 570-1113

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7239334497593642766

Abstract:
Giant Seabass are a species of large fish that live in the cool waters off the coast of California. This fish is the top predator of the kelp forest ecosystem, but the population has been low because of overfishing. Thanks to government protections in California, Giant Seabass are beginning to return to Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and NOAA is working with other groups to study them. The fish is unique because scientists believe it uses sounds to communicate. NOAA is working to record these sounds in the wild and study how these fish move around Santa Barbara Island, a small offshore island in the sanctuary.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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