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OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
2015 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

6 January 2015

Title: National Ecological Observatory Network in Alaska: Taiga and Tundra
Presenter(s): Katrine Gorham, NEON Field Operations Manager, Alaska
Date & Time: 6 January 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access or in person at ACCAP (930 Koyukuk Drive in Mather Library in the Akasofu Building, Fairbanks, AK
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Seminar Location: Online Access or in person at ACCAP (930 Koyukuk Drive in Mather Library in the Akasofu Building, Fairbanks, AK

Presenter(s):
Katrine Gorham, NEON Field Operations Manager, Alaska

Sponsor(s):
OneNOAA Science Seminar, ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinars

Abstract:
As part of the continental scale National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), study sites are being developed in the Alaska Taiga and Tundra regions. NEON will gather long-term data on ecological responses of the biosphere to changes in land use and climate, and on feedbacks with the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. Please join us for an overview of the NEON project and look ahead at development activities planned for Alaska.

8 January 2015

Title: Fringing salt marshes: Research to assess their vulnerability, resiliency, and adaptive management approaches
Presenter(s): Carolyn Currin, Ph.D., research scientist at NOAA/NCCOS Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research in Beaufort, NC
Date & Time: 8 January 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Carolyn Currin, Ph.D., research scientist at NOAA/NCCOS Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research in Beaufort, NC

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 . No code needed for internet.

Abstract:
The estuarine shoreline faces challenges from both rising sea level and storms on the waterward side, and from development and protection of waterfront property on the landward side. Natural estuarine shorelines in the Southeast U. S. are dominated by salt marsh, and their ability to keep up with sea level rise, and to stabilize the shoreline, have led to efforts to utilize salt marsh in ‘Living Shoreline' approaches. Our research in North Carolina has identified the wave energy regime which salt marsh can occupy,demonstrated the effectiveness of marsh in reducing bank erosion, and assessed the impact of stone sills on fringing marsh surface elevation change and plant distribution. These studies have also provided support for the utilization of fringing oyster reefs in Living Shoreline designs. Predictions of the response of salt marshes to accelerated sea level rise rely on an understanding of the relationship between marsh production and tidal inundation. We utilized surveyed SET marks to obtain in situ measures of the parabolic relationship between marsh biomass and tidal elevation, and found key differences between in situ and mesocosm results. These results provide science support for efforts to conserve and restore marsh habitat, and improve coastal resiliency utilizing natural infrastructure.

Bio(s):
Carolyn Currin is a research scientist working at the NOAA/NCCOS Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research in Beaufort, NC. Recent work has investigated the response of salt marshes to sea level rise, and the effect of shoreline stabilization on estuarine intertidal habitats. This work includes assessments of Living Shoreline installations, participation in state and federal policy working groups, and in outreach and training workshops. Currin's food web research uses stable isotopes to determine trophic relationships in natural and restored estuarine systems, and to delineate the role of benthic primary producers in supporting fishery production in coastal and reef ecosystems, including Marine Protected Areas. Currin leads a multi-investigator Coastal Wetlands Research group investigating climate change impacts and the carbon cycle in salt marshes for the Department of Defense Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, and is a member of the North Carolina Sentinel Site Management Team. Dr. Currin is also an Associate Editor for Estuaries and Coasts, and is adjunct faculty at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Her education includes a B.S. in Zoology from North Carolina State University and Ph. D. in Marine Sciences from University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.
Title: Keeping the Promise of Sydney - Next Steps for the Marine Agenda from the World Parks Congress
Presenter(s): Lauren Wenzel, NOAA MPA Center, and Dan Laffoley, IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas
Date & Time: 8 January 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lauren Wenzel (NOAA MPA Center) and Dan Laffoley, Marine Vice Chair for IUCN's World Commission on Protected Areas.

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3426912025008427266

Abstract:
A presentation on coastal and marine recommendations and next steps from November's landmark global forum on world parks.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 January 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Exploring an Integer Programming Approach for Modeling Stated Preference Trip Count Data
Presenter(s): David F. Layton, Ph.D, Professor of Public Affairs and Economics
Date & Time: 8 January 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access only (Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David F. Layton, Ph.D, Professor of Public Affairs and Economics

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar JAM ABSTRACT Econometric modeling of trip count data involves melding economic assumptions regarding the structure of demand and statistical assumptions regarding the form of the dependent variable. To date, two primary traditions have emerged. Count data modeling focuses on the integer (count) structure of the data, while Kuhn-Tucker based approaches focus on the underlying utility function that generates demand while dealing with the fact that observed quantities must be non-negative. We investigate the feasibility of an economically motivated integer programming approach to modeling trip count data with application to stated preference survey data that builds on the strengths of both alternative approaches. Our approach involves drawing upon the explicit utility function representation utilized in Kuhn-Tucker based approaches and then extracting conditions that emerge from economic theory to substantially reduce the space of integer bundles that need to be considered in econometric estimation. We explore the extent to which different assumptions regarding the utility function reduce the complexity of the estimation problem. BIO David F. Layton is Professor of Public Affairs at the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. He is an economist whose research has largely focused on the intersection between discrete choice econometrics, Stated Preference survey design and analysis, and a number of environmental policy issues ranging from: endangered species conservation; how people value the potential far future effects of climate change; valuation of transportation attributes and the use of choice heuristics; and fishing decisions. RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS/WEBSITES http://evans.uw.edu/profile/layton

13 January 2015

Title: Arctic Modeling: Improving Models and Predictions in the Arctic
Presenter(s): Olga Sergienko, NOAA GFDL, Hal Ritchie, Environment Canada, Wanqiu Wang, NOAA NCEP CPC
Date & Time: 13 January 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.the Arctic
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Olga Sergienko (NOAA GFDL), Hal Ritchie (Environment Canada), Wanqiu Wang (NOAA NCEP CPC) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=294466420 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: TBD

15 January 2015

Title: Postponed to 2/11/15: Intellectual Property Basics: Avoiding Pitfalls and Increasing the Impact of your Collaborations
Presenter(s): Derek Kelly, Technology Transfer Program Manager, NOAA's Technology Partnerships Office
Date & Time: 15 January 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Intellectual Property Basics: Avoiding Pitfalls and Increasing the Impact of your Collaborations

Presenter(s):
Derek Kelly, Technology Transfer Program Manager, NOAA's Technology Partnerships Office (TPO)

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; coorindator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NOAA scientists and engineers regularly produce, support, and manage a wide range of products and services that are used by the public, decision-makers, academia, and industry. Often these tools are transitioned to end users without any formal agreements or controls in place. While this approach may be easier in the short term, it can present problems in the future when you find you are supporting a semi-operational R&D system with a decreasing budget and no other compensation. Or worse, you may find the private sector partner that helped you develop the system is now looking to charge your lab for the intellectual property you and your lab helped them to develop. This seminar will help scientists, engineers, and managers get the most out of your collaborations by understanding the basics of intellectual property and collaborative agreements with industry. You can not only avoid the pitfalls others have experienced, but you could bring in extra income to fund future R&D efforts.

Bio(s):
Derek Parks is the Technology Transfer Program Manager in NOAA's Technology Partnerships Office. Derek has worked for 21 years in various positions at the Department of Commerce, including as Import Compliance Specialist and an Export Promotion Manager with the International Trade Administration. Derek has been with NOAA for 8 years, serving as the Executive Secretariat for the NOAA Research Council and a Policy Analyst for OAR's Office Policy, Planning, and Evaluation. Derek has been the Program Manager for NOAA's Technology Transfer Program for the last 3 years, working to promote the once-dormant program and the benefits of technology transfer. Derek graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Colorado, Boulder, with a degree in International Affairs and Italian.
Title: What does it mean to end overfishing?
Presenter(s): Richard Methot, Ph.D., Senior Scientist for Stock Assessments, NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 15 January 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online only (Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Richard Methot, Ph.D., Senior Scientist for Stock Assessments, NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw0401l/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc0901l%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D309684107%26UID%3D1838087607%26Host%3D8b0b8aca231f542c32021b%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm24591244fae4a2a2de6242281852aa5e Meeting number: 806 941 325 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Access code: 806 941 325

Abstract:
Overfishing is catching too many fish; but how much is too much, and over how long a period of time, and how certain do you need to be? With passage of the Magnuson-Stevens Reauthorization Act in 2006, Congress established the requirement to set annual catch limits such that overfishing does not occur, thus achieving the first stage of overfishing prevention by not allowing catch limits to be set beyond the best science information regarding biological limits. The subsequent update to the national implementation guidelines recognized that prevention of overfishing must be interpreted in probabilistic terms and the need for a buffer between biological catch limits and actual catch targets. This breaks down into dealing with management uncertainty and scientific uncertainty. Management uncertainty pertains to inadequate in-season control and measurement of catch such that the actual catch might exceed the intended catch. Scientific uncertainty pertains to the estimate of the limit itself such that the established limit may differ from the limit that would have been established if better data were available. Protocols for dealing with scientific and management uncertainty have been established by all U.S. Fishery Management Councils. A fourth source of overfishing pertains to systemic risk. This results from fundamental gaps in our knowledge of the fished stock's abundance and productivity and our very incomplete knowledge of the climate/ecosystem/habitat system in which fished stocks occur. These factors are outside of the uncertainty scope of assessments and can lead to unanticipated fishery booms or collapses.

20 January 2015

Title: Relationship between the forecast skills of the Great Plains low-level jet and mesoscale convective systems in 4 km WRF runs
Presenter(s): Brian Squitieri, Iowa State University
Date & Time: 20 January 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar Speaker Brian Squitieri, Iowa State University POC: Geoff Dimego GoTo meeting 1. Please join my meeting, https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/432258237 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (646) 749-3112 Access Code: 432-258-237 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 432-258-237 Abstract The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) fosters an environment that is supportive of nocturnal mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) across the central U.S. during the summer months. The goal of this research was to determine if forecast skill in the LLJ correlates to forecast skill in MCS precipitation in high spatial resolution (4 km) WRF runs. LLJs were classified based on total wind magnitude and synoptic background. Both cyclonic flow and inertial oscillation driven LLJs were included in this study. It was found that the forecast skill of the geostrophic and ageostrophic wind direction components correlated positively with statistical significance to forecast skill of MCS precipitation. The diurnal geostrophic wind maximum across the plains (induced by terrain sloping and heating) set up the background flow for the LLJ to develop and established the orientation of the LLJ (which would impact MCS evolution). The forecast skill in the ageostrophic wind direction correlated to MCS precipitation forecast skill since the ageostrophic winds induced convergence at the terminus of the LLJ, which benefited MCS longevity only if the ageostrophic wind held a perpendicular component to the MCS. No significant correlation was found between MCS precipitation forecast skill and the forecast skills of 700 hPa temperature advection, mixed layer convective available potential energy, mixed layer convective inhibition, 0-1 km, 0-3 km and 0-6 km shear along with surface and 850 hPa frontogenesis and horizontal moisture flux convergence.

21 January 2015

Title: CAPES: Coastal Aquaculture Planning & Environmental Sustainability
Presenter(s): James Morris, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CFFHR/Applied Ecology & Restoration Research Branch
Date & Time: 21 January 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150, 1305 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
James, Morris, Ph.D., NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CFFHR/Applied Ecology & Restoration Research Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; coordinator is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting number: 744925156; NO PASSCODE required for webinar.

Abstract:
Marine aquaculture has emerged as an industry that is growing at an unprecedented rate and occupying increasing space along our nation's coastline. For many coastal communities, aquaculture promises economic development and revitalization of working waterfronts.There is concern that aquaculture, along with other sectors of ocean technology such as renewable energy, is expanding at a rate that challenges our ability to plan, manage, and govern public trust marine resources. The National Ocean Service (NOS) has long held a vision for sustaining an equitable balance of uses in the coastal ocean supporting recreation, commerce, national security, subsistence, education, and cultural preservation. The NOS is uniquely positioned to guide marine aquaculture planning and development in the coastal zone. The CAPES program seeks to utilize this expertise and apply it to aquaculture development in the coastal zone. This seminar will review CAPES strategic approaches to build coastal intelligence and planning tools specifically for marine aquaculture. The impact of these efforts around the U.S. and future directions will also be discussed.

Bio(s):
James Morris, an ecologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), works in the Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research in Beaufort, N.C., conducting research on invasive species, aquaculture, and other issues that affect coastal ecosystems. In 2011, Morris received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for his research on invasive species and marine aquaculture. His studies of invasive lionfish in the western Atlantic and Caribbean helped marine ecologists better understand how lionfish physiology drives the invasion. His studies also helped define the ecological impact of lionfish on reef fish communities and better understand the global threat lionfish pose to biodiversity. In addition, he contributed significantly to developing and improving low-impact aquaculture practices for coastal areas. He talks about his work to a variety of audiences, from his peers to non-scientists to students. James Morris holds a bachelor's and master's of science in biology from East Carolina University, and a doctorate in biology at North Carolina State University.
Title: Reducing Model Bias in a High Altitude Forecast System
Presenter(s): John McCormack, NRL
Date & Time: 21 January 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Center, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction,5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA)

Presenter(s):
John McCormack, NRL

Abstract:
A prototype high-altitude numerical weather prediction (NWP) and data assimilation (DA) system has recently been developed based on the operational Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) that can generate global synoptic meteorological analyses every 6 hours from the ground to the lower thermosphere (~100 km altitude). In addition to assimilating operational meteorological observations in the 0-50 km altitude range, this high-altitude version of NAVGEM can also assimilate temperature and constituent measurements throughout the stratosphere and mesosphere obtained from satellite-based instruments. This presentation will discuss changes in the forecast model introduced to improve model accuracy and thus minimize bias at high altitudes. Results from this new system show how it can be used to (1) provide improved initial conditions for stratosphere-resolving NWP and climate models; and (2) investigate dynamical coupling between the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere. A challenge facing high-altitude NWP efforts is the scarcity of operational satellite observations above 50 km. The importance of these types of observations for planned development of unified ground-to-space forecast systems will also be discussed. Remote Access Video: 1. Go to JCSDA Seminarthis link opens in a new window and click on the seminar title 2. Enter your name and email address. 3. Click "Join Now". 4. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557 International: 1-517-345-5260
Title: Teaching Ocean Acidification: A Walk-Through of Data and Online Resources for Educators
Presenter(s): Paulo Maurin, Hawaii Management Liaison, NOAA Coral Program
Date & Time: 21 January 2015
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: remote attendance only, registration info here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9144480242225876482
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Paulo Maurin, NOAA Coral Program Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9144480242225876482

Sponsor(s):
SOARCE webinar series, NOAA NMS and OAP Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.bennett@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Ocean acidification is a complex problem affecting the world's ocean - it presents unique challenges in the areas of science, policy, management, and also in education - how can we effectively teach about it? This hands-on session will cover products developed by NOAA Coral Program and partners that help educators teach key scientific concepts behind ocean acidification while engaging audiences, and will walk through how to use and interpret real ocean acidification data, conduct interactive virtual experiments, and where to guide audiences so they can further explore the topic.

22 January 2015

Title: Enterprise Risk and Performance Management
Presenter(s): Abigail Harper, NOAA Director of Program and Risk Management, Office of the Deputy Undersecretary
Date & Time: 22 January 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library

Presenter(s):
Abigail Harper, NOAA Director of Program and Risk Management, Office of the Deputy Undersecretary Description: •Learn methods to reveal how well your organization is performing •Discover how to anticipate barriers that may put your organization off-track and what to do about it •Enterprise Risk and Performance Management are Techniques to Help. More information at www.lib.noaa.gov. Speaker's Biography: Ms. Harper has 30 years of experience in satellite systems, program/project management and strategy development. She is currently the Director of Program and Risk management at NOAA after previously serving as Deputy Assistant Administrator, systems for NOAA Environmental Satellite Information Service (NESDIS) and GOES-R program manager. Prior to coming to NOAA, Ms. Harper held positions of increasing responsibility at NASA GSFC in systems engineering and project management Point of contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, 713-2600 ext 140
Title: Integrated Analysis: The Worst Thing that Happened to Fisheries Stock Assessment
Presenter(s): Mark Maunder, Ph.D., Head of the Stock Assessment Program, Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission; and Kevin Piner, Ph.D, Fishery Research Ecologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 22 January 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWFSC Map to NWFSC 2725 Montlake Blvd. E. Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Mark Maunder, Ph.D., Head of the Stock Assessment Program, Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission; and Kevin Piner, Ph.D, Fishery Research Ecologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=mbc5af2c15d6b32a32a8141fd070fb4d0 Meeting number: 806 941 325 Audio connection: 1-650-479-3207 Call-in toll number (US/Canada) ABSTRACT Contemporary fisheries stock assessment models often use multiple diverse data sets to extract as much information as possible about all model processes. This has led to the mindset that integrated models can compensate for lack of good data (e.g. surveys and catch-at-age). However, models are, by definition, simplifications of reality, and model misspecification can cause degradation of results when including additional data sets. The process, observation, and sampling components of the model must all be approximately correct to minimize biased results. Unfortunately, even the basic processes that we assume we understand well (e.g. growth and selectivity) are misspecified in most, if not all, stock assessments. These misspecified processes, in combination with composition data, result in biased estimates of absolute abundance and abundance trends, which are often evident as “data conflicts”. This is further compounded by over-weighting of composition data in many assessments from misuse of data weighting approaches. The law of conflicting data states that since data is true, conflicting data implies model misspecification, but needs to be interpreted in the context of random sampling error, and down weighting or dropping conflicting data is not necessarily appropriate because it may not resolve the model misspecification. Data sets could be analyzed outside the integrated model and the resulting parameter estimates for population processes and their uncertainty used in the integrated model (e.g. as a prior), but these analyses typically involve more assumptions, implicit or explicit, that are potentially misspecified leading to biased results. Model misspecification and process variation can be accounted for in the variance parameters of the likelihoods (observation error), but it is unclear when this is appropriate. The appropriate method to deal with data conflicts depends on if it is caused by random sampling error, observation model misspecification, or system dynamics model misspecification. Diagnostic approaches are urgently needed to test goodness of fit and identify model misspecification. We recommend external estimation of the sampling error variance used in likelihood functions, including process variation in the integrated model, and internal estimation of the process error variance. The required statistical framework is computationally intensive, but practical approaches are being developed.

26 January 2015

Title: How NOAA, USCG, and maritime industry worked together to move shipping lanes away from endangered whale-feeding grounds
Presenter(s): Trisha Bergmann, Michael Carver, Monica DeAngelis, Sean Hastings, Karen Reyna, Jessica Redfern, Elizabeth Petras, Lisa Wooninck
Date & Time: 26 January 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd floor, East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
NOAA Department of Commerce Gold Medal Team " Stephanie Altman, Trisha Bergmann, Michael Carver, Monica DeAngelis, Sean Hastings, Karen Reyna, Jessica Redfern, Elizabeth Petras, Lisa Wooninck (see bios below) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov

Abstract:
NOAA aims to reduce the risk of whale ship strikes, which can cause serious injuries and death to many whale species. As a result of a large number of ship strikes occurring in 2007 and 2010 on ESA-listed whale species off the California coast, ONMS and NMFS employed a collaborative approach to move shipping lanes away from known whale feeding grounds. NOAA seized an opportunity to collaborate with USCG on their Port Access Route Study (PARS) for California ports, thereby utilizing a USCG process and authority, principally focused on enhancing navigational safety, to protect endangered whales. NOAA developed proposals for the PARS process using key information, such as a decade of fine scale whale and ship distribution data; an assessment of the risk of ships striking whales using newly developed methodologies in a marine spatial planning framework; and a layered PDF to convey complex ecosystem-vessel traffic interactions. Equipped with this compelling information, NOAA communicated with USCG, fishermen, and the maritime industry, and turned significant opposition into support for modifying the shipping lanes at the approaches to the harbors of Los Angeles and San Francisco. At the International Maritime Organization (IMO), staff from NOAA's Office of International Affairs and General Council presented the rationale for the proposals and successfully negotiated the terms of agreement with international representatives. After securing support from the U.S. Delegation to the IMO, on June 1, 2013 the newly designed IMO approved shipping lanes went into effect off California. The lane changes improve navigational safety by setting dedicated tracks through areas of high collision risk between vessels, and decrease the co-occurrence of ships and endangered whales, while still promoting commerce through U.S. harbors. NOAA's cross-line office team has been selected to receive the Department of Commerce gold medal for professional and personal excellence for collaborating with USCG and the maritime industry to move shipping lanes away from the feeding grounds of endangered whales. Speaker

Bio(s):
Stephanie Altman is an attorney advisor in the International Section of NOAA General Counsel (GC) and is currently on detail as the Acting Deputy Chief of the Oceans and Coasts Section of NOAA GC. Stephanie is an advisor to the U.S. delegation at the IMO and worked with ONMS and NMFS to develop the IMO proposals to amend the existing traffic separation schemes off the coast of California. Trisha Bergmann works at NOAA International Affairs and is the NOAA representative to the International Maritime Organization. She is an oceanographer who specializes in international science policy. Michael Carver is the deputy superintendent of Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary. His role is to oversee enforcement, permitting, planning, and management actions to address threats to the marine environment of the sanctuary. Since 5 whales were confirmed killed by ship strike in 2010 Michael has worked with partner agencies, industry, and the NGO community to address this issue. Monica DeAngelis is the marine mammal biologist at the National Marine Fisheries Service, West Coast Regional Office. Her current duties include the management and conservation of marine mammals by implementing the Marine Mammal Protection Act and Endangered Species Act and other relevant environmental regulations and policies while working closely with other scientists and researchers worldwide. Since 2003, Monica has worked with partner agencies, industry, the NGO community, and the public to address the large whale vessel collision issue off of the U.S. West Coast. Sean Hastings is resource protection coordinator at Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. Since 1997 Sean has been responsible for the development of policies and programs to address industrial, military, commercial and recreational uses and impacts in and around the sanctuary. Sean helped to create a network of complete “no-take” zones to restore local fish and invertebrate populations and habitats in the sanctuary, and helped the State of California to do the same in state waters on the mainland. Since 2007 he has played a key role facilitating the Sanctuary Advisory Council process toward consensus on development and implementation of ship strike reduction policies, research and education initiatives, and a prevention and emergency response plan. Karen Reyna is a resource protection coordinator for the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Her current duties include regulatory and policy planning and implementation, restoration project management, and working with local communities to better manage human activities that impact the ocean waters, habitat and wildlife, including whales. Jessica Redfern is the leader of the marine mammal spatial habitat and risk program at the NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center. Jessica and colleagues used whale-habitat models to assess the risk of ships striking humpback, blue, and fin whales in alternative shipping routes off Southern California. The shipping routes were derived from observed patterns of shipping traffic. They also estimated the potential for conflict between shipping and other uses or marine waters (military training and fishing) due to overlap with the routes. Elizabeth Petras is a natural resources management specialist at the NMFS West Coast Regional Office Protected Resources Division in the marine mammal and sea turtle team. She has worked for NOAA for over 10 years specializing in Endangered Species Act, Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Magnuson Stevens Act regulations and implementation. She is NMFS' representative to the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council and has served on the SAC's marine shipping advisory committee. She was also a member of the Gulf of the Farallones/Cordell Bank NMS Joint Working Group on Vessel Strikes and Acoustic impacts. Lisa Wooninck is policy coordinator at the ONMS West Coast Region where she coordinates regulatory and policy actions for the five west coast national marine sanctuaries. She has worked for various NOAA programs over the past decade, including NMFS, the National MPA Center and Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Her work focuses on using ecosystem-based management tools to promote an integration of sustainable human uses and conservation in the marine environment.

27 January 2015

Title: Eta vs sigma: Placement of storms, Gallus-Klemp test, and 250 hPa wind skill compared to ECMWF in ensemble experiments
Presenter(s): Fedor Mesinger, NOAA/NCEP/EMC
Date & Time: 27 January 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Fedor Mesinger, NCEP/EMC Presentation: http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2015/fm.kv.emc2015.pdf 1. Please join my meeting, Jan 27, 2015 https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/151101397 2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone. Dial +1 (872) 240-3212 Access Code: 151-101-397 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 151-101-397 Fedor Mesinger, NCEP/EMC, and Katarina Veljović, University of Belgrade, Serbia Abstract Over the years as many as five times documented tests were done comparing the Eta model against the same code but switched to use sigma and in all of them the eta version did better. Among these results, better precipitation scores, and more accurate placement of storms, stand out. A possibility that these results came because the Eta precipitation schemes were “tuned” to work best with the eta would seem to have been eliminated by the results of the parallel test comparing the Eta/EDAS system against the NMM-WRF/GSI system during the 5+ months of 2006. In this parallel the operational Eta although “frozen” for considerable time achieved better precipitation scores than the NMM-WRF that used more advanced data assimilation system, the more so the further one moved away from the data assimilation time. A weakness that received extraordinary notoriety of flow separation in the lee of the Witch of Agnesi topography, is shown to have been removed with the latest refinement of the sloping steps eta discretization. Results that were presented by Veljovic et al. (Meteor. Z., 2010) included those of an experiment in which 26 Eta ensemble members driven by an ECMWF 32-day ensemble mostly had better scores in placing strong 250 hPa winds than their driver members. Trying to identify the primary cause of this perhaps surprising result 10 of the Eta members were driven by switching the vertical coordinate to sigma. While no obvious impact on 250 hPa wind scores stood out, a tendency was seen for more accurate tilt of a 250 hPa trough of the eta compared to sigma members. To test the sensitivity to resolution and also to check on the robustness of this Eta vs ECMWF result to the choice of the period a 10-member Eta experiment was rerun for a more recent ECMWF ensemble, one initialized 4 October 2012, when its resolution was higher than of that used previously. The advantage of the Eta members more frequently than not is seen again, even though this time the resolution of the Eta during the first 10 days of the experiment was about the same as that of the driver ECMWF members. Rerunning the Eta ensemble with the code switched to sigma this time however an advantage of the Eta/eta over the Eta/sigma is seen, quite noticeable during the early 2-6 day period of the experiment when a deep upper-air trough was moving across the Rockies. Candidate reasons for the advantage of the Eta and also Eta/sigma over ECMWF are commented upon.
Title: How fishermen balance incentives and why it matters for fisheries management
Presenter(s): Dr. Alan Haynie, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 27 January 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 12871 or https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/119645823
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. Alan Haynie (Alaska Fisheries Science Center) Seminar sponsor: QUEST Webinar

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/119645823

Abstract:
Dr. Alan Haynie (Economist, Alaska Fisheries Science Center) will provide a presentation on how fishermen balance incentives and why it matters for fisheries management. Commercial fishermen make decisions about where, when, and how to fish based on a diverse and dynamic set of incentives and constraints. This talk provides an overview of spatial analyses conducted at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center over the last decade that address how fishers and fish processors in different Alaska fisheries have been affected by changing incentives, including season lengths, markets, and environmental conditions. We also discuss the value and challenges of different data sources used in these analyses. How can this research be used to improve the management of the Nation's marine resources? Fisheries managers have a broad range of tools and models at their disposal. Ecosystem-based management, marine protected areas, and catch shares are all utilized to different degrees throughout the country to achieve policy goals. Better incorporating our understanding of fisher behavior into management involves developing better modeling and teaching tools and ensuring that we recognize that fishing in the future will be dependent on future fish distributions, markets, and management. It also involves long-term interdisciplinary research and interaction with fishermen.

28 January 2015

Title: The Coastal Change Analysis Program: Tracking Changes in Coastal Land Cover through Time
Presenter(s): Nate Herold, NOAA/NOS/OCM's Science and Geospatial Division, manager of the Coastal Change Analysis Program - C-CAP
Date & Time: 28 January 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Nate Herold, Manager of the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) in NOAA/NOS/OCM's Science and Geospatial Division

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 . No passcode needed for internet.

Abstract:
Understanding current conditions and how the land has changed through the years is essential to improving our understanding of the impact of past management practices, and effectively responding to environmental and human-induced changes now and in the future. NOAA's Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) produces nationally standardized land cover and change information for the coastal areas of the U.S. These products inventory coastal intertidal areas, wetlands, and adjacent uplands. This presentation will provide an overview of changes seen in the contiguous U.S. from 1996 through 2011, as well as some of the uses of this information and some of the more detailed mapping projects conducted in areas that include Hawaii, the Pacific territories, U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico (ongoing).

Bio(s):
Nate Herold works within the Science and Geospatial Division of the new NOAA/NOS Office for Coastal Management (OCM), where he leads NOAA's land cover mapping activities, managing the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP). Nate has been with NOAA for 11 years and is located in Charleston, South Carolina. Before coming to NOAA he worked in the private sector on the production of land cover products worldwide. He has a bachelor's degree in soil science from Penn State University and a master's in geography from George Mason University.

3 February 2015

Title: The Man Who Re-made the Americas by Mapping Them: Alexander von Humboldt, His Cartographies and His Science
Presenter(s): Dr. Imre Demhardt, University of Texas-Arlington
Date & Time: 3 February 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Imre Demhardt, University of Texas-Arlington

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar; contact John.Cloud@noaa.gov for more.

Abstract:
The Prussian geographer Humboldt and his partner the botanist Aime Bonpland traveled in North and South America only between 1799 and 1804, but they influenced and informed how people looked at the Americas for the next century and more, as summarized in the useful phrase "Humboldtian science", integrating all the physical sciences. Imre Demhardt is one of the leading contemporary historians of cartography, here to see the historic resources of NOAA, and to deliver a lively presentation on the work of one of the greatest geographers there has been.

Bio(s):
Imre Demhardt is a German scholar of historic and human geography and the history of cartography. He has a Ph.D from the University of Frankfurt am Main and a Habitation (another Ph.D) from the University of Darmstadt, with extensive fieldwork and teaching experience in Africa. Since 2008, he has been a Professor and Endowed Chair in the History of Cartography at the University of Texas at Arlington.
Title: The climate has changed, have we? Reflections on 50 years of fire management in Alaska.
Presenter(s): Randi Jandt, Alaska Fire Science Consortium
Date & Time: 3 February 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: 930 Koyukuk Drive in Mather Library, Akasofu Building, Fairbanks, AK
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars Date/Time: Tuesday, February 3, 2015 (10:00-11:00 AKST)

Presenter(s):
Randi Jandt, Alaska Fire Science Consortium

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) and the Alaska Fire Science Consortium. Point of contact is Tina Buxbaum ((907-474-7812 or tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

Abstract:
Randi Jandt will talk about the evolution of Alaska firefighting practices--field and management--over the past 50 years. We are starting to be aware of the changes in climate and in Alaskan forests: is the wildfire "problem" the same one we faced a half-century ago? Have our management approaches and thinking about wildfire changed during that time? She will combine her background in land and fire management agencies with input from long-term observers to discuss which changes might be a response to changing weather, climate, & fire regimes in Alaska.

5 February 2015

Title: Land Based Sources of Pollution in Faga'alu Bay, American Samoa
Presenter(s): Dr. David Whitall, Ecologist, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCMA/Coastal Oceanographic Assessment Status and Trends Branch
Date & Time: 5 February 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150, 1305 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David Whitall, Ph.D. Ecologist, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCMA/Coastal Oceanographic Assessment Status and Trends (COAST) Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet.Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# . Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 . No passcode needed for internet.

Abstract:
Faga'alu watershed and Bay, located on the south shore of American Samoa near Pago Pago Harbor, was designated in 2012 by the US Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF) as a priority watershed for the USCRTF Watershed Partnership Initiative. Significant scientific and management resources are being focused on this system. In order to measure change in the Bay, a starting point or “baseline” must be quantified. Sediment samples collected in January 2014 were quantified for metals, PAHs, PCBs, butyltins, and pesticides.

Bio(s):
Dr. Dave Whitall is a coastal ecologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science's Center, Coastal Monitoring and Assessment. His expertise is in aquatic biogeochemistry, and pollution in marine ecosystems.

9 February 2015

Title: Sport Divers Map the Wreck of the USC&GS Steamer
Presenter(s): Steve Nagiewicz, Explorers Club Fellow and Artist Travis Nagiewicz
Date & Time: 9 February 2015
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC3, Room 4527 (4th floor large conf. room), 1315 Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series NOAA Heritage Week Lunchtime Talks: Feb 9, 10 and 12!

Presenter(s):
Steve Nagiewicz, Explorers Club Fellow and Artist Travis Nagiewicz

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and Office of Coast Survey, and the Coast and Geodetic Survey Heritage Society. Point of contact is Cheryl.Oliver@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Explorers Club Fellow Steve Nagiewicz will discuss a recent sport diver mission to map and document the wreck of the 19th century U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer Robert J. Walker. Special guest Travis Nagiewicz will make a special presentation to NOAA of his digital painting of the Walker in her glory, surveying the coast. Note: NOAA Open House in Silver Spring, MD on Sat, Feb. 7, 9am-4pm http://preserveamerica.noaa.gov/hw13.html

Remote Access:
N/A

10 February 2015

Title: Impact of air-sea flux and boundary layer parameterizations on the intensity and structure of tropical cyclones
Presenter(s): Ben Green and Fuqing Zhang, Penn State University
Date & Time: 10 February 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP),Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Ben Green and Fuqing Zhang, Penn State University POC: Vijay Tallapragada - NOAA Federal Abstract TCs are fueled by large fluxes of sensible and latent heat from the air-sea interface. These fluxes (as well as momentum fluxes) cannot be explicitly resolved by NWP models and therefore must be parameterized. Unfortunately, there is a great deal of uncertainty as to the behavior of air-sea surface fluxes, especially under strong (hurricane-force) winds. Thus, the numerous NWP parameterizations of surface fluxes introduce model error into TC forecasts, which limits the accuracy of predictions of TC intensity. In this talk, the sensitivity of WRF-ARW simulated TCs to parameterizations of the surface exchange coefficients for drag (Cd) and moist enthalpy (Ck) is examined. In agreement with theory, increased Ck yields a stronger TC both in terms of minimum central pressure and maximum 10-m wind speed. The impacts of Cd are not as straightforward: increased drag does reduce the maximum 10-m wind speed (in agreement with theory), but also deepens the minimum central pressure (opposite of what is predicted by theory) " in other words, Cd changes the pressure-wind relationship of simulated TCs. Cd also profoundly impacts TC structure, such that increased drag yields a more compact primary circulation. Finally, some “Large Eddy Permitting (LEP)” simulations (run for 4-6 hours, with "x as small as 111 m) of Hurricane Katrina (2005) are shown. These LEP runs " which use a nonlinear backscatter with anisotropy (NBA) subgrid-scale parameterization scheme " exhibit features resembling small-scale turbulence for "x as large as 333 m. The size of these turbulent structures depends on "x, indicating convergence to true LES has not been reached. That said, however, the azimuthally averaged low-level secondary circulation is remarkably similar between the LEP runs but considerably different than PBL runs at "x = 333 m: the latter begin to undergo secondary eyewall formation whereas the former do not.
Title: Forecasting Eruptions At Axial Seamount
Presenter(s): Dr. Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University scientist with the Cooperative Institute for Marine Resource Studies
Date & Time: 10 February 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Bill Chadwick, an Oregon State University scientist with the Cooperative Institute for Marine Resource Studies

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Seminar Series; point of contact is mary.lou.cumberpatch@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Axial Seamount is the most active submarine volcano in the NE Pacific and is the site of the first volcano observatory on the deep seafloor. NOAA and NSF have partnered on pioneering ocean exploration and research here on the dynamic interactions between geologic, hydrothermal and biological processes that effect Axial's unique ecosystems. High-resolution pressure sensors that were developed for tsunami detection in the open ocean have been used at Axial Seamount to measure vertical movements of the seafloor related to a cycle of volcanic inflation and deflation. Between eruptions, magma accumulates in a reservoir beneath Axial's summit caldera and the seafloor slowly rises at 10's of cm/yr. During eruptions, the reservoir deflates and the seafloor rapidly subsides up to several meters. This kind of volcano deformation has been used on land to forecast eruptions but this is the first time this technique has been attempted on the seafloor. Axial Seamount erupted in 1998 and again in 2011. Can we forecast when it erupt next? Bill's submarine volcanic exploration and research is both exciting and it is providing foundations for pioneering physical, chemical, and biological ocean environmental advances.

Bio(s):
Bill Chadwick is a Research Professor at Oregon State University's Cooperative Institute for Marine Resources Studies and has worked with NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Lab for over 25 years. He is a geologist and studies submarine volcanism and hydrothermal venting and their impacts on the oceans.
Title: Integrated Toxicological Assessments of Sediment Quality
Presenter(s): Dennis Apeti, PhD, NOAA National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment
Date & Time: 10 February 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 6817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dennis Apeti, Ph.D (NOAA National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of Education, Educational Partnership Program, Cooperative Science Centers. Dr. Apeti is an alum of NOAA EPP. Seminar POC for questions: Audrey.Trotman@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://connectpro46305642.adobeconnect.com/r6fitn64as4/ OPTIONAL AUDIO: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-931-3834. Enter passcode 625599#

Abstract:
Productivity, which characterizes the health of marine ecosystems, largely depends on the quality of the benthic sediment. To characterize the health of sediments in coastal environment, the NOAA's National Status and Trends (NS&T) program utilizes the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) approach, an ecosystem-based assessment that identifies area of concern and provides essential information to coastal managers for critical management control and restoration activities. A case study in Kachemak Bay, Alaska is utilized herein to discuss the NOAA's SQT approach. (Dennis Apeti, Ph.D, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment) URL for Viewing Recorded

Remote Access:
http://connectpro46305642.adobeconnect.com/p4723mbv2ie/
Title: From Whaling to Watching: The Voyage of the Charles W. Morgan
Presenter(s): Deborah Marx, Maritime Archaeologist, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 10 February 2015
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Gateway to NOAA, SSMC2, Ground Floor, 1325 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series NOAA Heritage Week Lunchtime Talks: Feb 9, 10 and 12!

Presenter(s):
Deborah Marx, Maritime Archaeologist, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Point of contact is Cheryl.Oliver@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Join Maritime Archaeologist Deborah Marx from NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries as she discusses the 2014 journey of Charles W. Morgan, a 19th century American whaling ship, to Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary in Massachusetts from its Mystic, Connecticut homeport. Note: NOAA Open House in Silver Spring, MD on Sat, Feb. 7, 9am-4pm http://preserveamerica.noaa.gov/hw13.html

Remote Access:
N/A

11 February 2015

Title: Intellectual Property Basics: Avoiding Pitfalls and Increasing the Impact of your Collaborations
Presenter(s): Kelly Wright, Director for NOAA's Technology Partnerships Office-TPO, and Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager, NOAA's TPO
Date & Time: 11 February 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kelly Wright, Director for NOAA's Technology Partnerships Office (TPO), and Derek Parks, Technology Transfer Program Manager, NOAA's TPO

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 . No passcode is needed for the web.

Abstract:
NOAA scientists and engineers regularly produce, support, and manage a wide range of products and services that are used by the public, decision-makers, academia, and industry. Often these tools are transitioned to end users without any formal agreements or controls in place. While this approach may be easier in the short term, it can present problems in the future when you find you are supporting a semi-operational R&D system with a decreasing budget and no other compensation. Or worse, you may find the private sector partner that helped you develop the system is now looking to charge your lab for the intellectual property you and your lab helped them to develop. This seminar will help scientists, engineers, and managers get the most out of your collaborations by understanding the basics of intellectual property and collaborative agreements with industry. You can not only avoid the pitfalls others have experienced, but you could bring in extra income to fund future R&D efforts.

Bio(s):
Kelly Wright is the Director of the Technology Partnerships Office (TPO) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Prior to becoming director of TPO in June 2012, Ms. Wright served as director of NOAA's SBIR program. She worked at NOAA for 24 years in a number of capacities. Kelly graduated from George Mason University with a degree in Conservation Biology. Derek Parks is the Technology Transfer Program Manager in NOAA's Technology Partnerships Office. Derek has been with NOAA for 8 years, serving as the Executive Secretariat for the NOAA Research Council and a Policy Analyst for OAR's Office Policy, Planning, and Evaluation. Derek has been the Program Manager for NOAA's Technology Transfer Program for the last 3 years, working to promote the once-dormant program and the benefits of technology transfer. Derek graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Colorado, Boulder, with a degree in International Affairs and Italian.
Title: Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammals from autonomous vehicles and moored platforms: development and applications
Presenter(s): Dr. Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 11 February 2015
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Clark Conference Room, NEFSC Aquarium, 166 Water St., Woods Hole, MA. Remote access login information is below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Mark Baumgartner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Sponsor(s):
Joint Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) Seminar. Point of Contact: Michael.Jech@noaa.gov Where: Clark Conference Room, NEFSC Aquarium, 166 Water St., Woods Hole, MA. Remote Access Info: Adobe Connect Meeting Meeting Name: Joint NEFSC-WHOI Seminar 4 To join the meeting: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/nefsc-whoi-4/ Audio only through teleconference: Conference Number(s): 866-802-5322 (toll-free, US) or +1 517-600-4898 (toll, outside US); Participant Code: 5050895

Abstract:
The use of moored passive acoustic recorders for monitoring marine mammals has increased dramatically over the past two decades, providing new insights into their seasonal occurrence, distribution, and ecology. Since these instruments are archival, the audio is inaccessible until the recorder is recovered, making real-time response to the presence of vocalizing animals impossible. New instrumentation and methods have been developed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to detect, classify, and report in near real time the sounds of marine mammals from both mobile autonomous vehicles and moored platforms. With the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center and other collaborators, these technologies are being used to conduct surveys in difficult-to-access areas and seasons, direct ship- and aircraft-based monitoring and research activities, mitigate harmful interactions between human activities and whales, and to help enable early response to mass stranding events. The development of this technology and current and planned applications will be presented. About the speaker: Dr. Baumgartner is an Associate Scientist at WHOI whose research interests focus primarily on top predator ecology and the physical and biological oceanographic processes that allow those predators to survive in the ocean.

12 February 2015

Title: Fish Tips!
Presenter(s): Brian Vaubel, NOAA's Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection
Date & Time: 12 February 2015
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Gateway to NOAA, SSMC2, Ground Floor, 1325 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series NOAA Heritage Week Lunchtime Talks: Feb 9, 10 and 12!

Presenter(s):
Brian Vaubel, NOAA's Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection. Point of contact is Cheryl.Oliver@noaa.gov

Abstract:
There are a lot of choices at the seafood counter. How do you pick the freshest fish or shellfish? What should you look for? Join Brian Vaubel of NOAA's Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection as he shares easy tips for buying seafood. In the meantime, visit www.FishWatch.gov for more information! Note: NOAA Open House in Silver Spring, MD on Sat, Feb. 7, 9am - 4pm http://preserveamerica.noaa.gov/hw13.html

Remote Access:
N/A
Title: Weather-Climate Linkages: Analysis, Modeling, and Prediction Efforts
Presenter(s): Chris Bretherton, University of Washington, Martin Hoerling, NOAA ESRL, Nat Johnson, NOAA GFDL
Date & Time: 12 February 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Chris Bretherton (University of Washington), Martin Hoerling (NOAA ESRL), Nat Johnson (NOAA GFDL) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=292954186 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: TBD
Title: Integrating Oceans into the Landscape Conservation Cooperative Network
Presenter(s): Elsa M. Haubold, Ph.D., PMP, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Landscape Conservation Cooperative Coordinator
Date & Time: 12 February 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access. Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4230037100306610946
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Elsa M. Haubold, Ph.D., PMP - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Landscape Conservation Cooperative Coordinator

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National MPA Center Webinar Series and is co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network, OpenChannels.org, and MPA News. Seminar POC for questions: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4230037100306610946

Abstract:
Conservation challenges of the 21st century are complex and include both local challenges and widespread threats such as drought, climate change, and large-scale habitat fragmentation. These complex threats impact entire landscapes and multiple resources simultaneously and are too large for any single organization to meet alone. The Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) provide a forum for States, Tribes, Federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, universities and other groups to work together in a new way. LCCs provide scientific and technical expertise for conservation planning at landscape scales and promote collaboration among their members in defining shared conservation goals. In this webinar, Dr. Elsa Haubold, National Coordinator for the Landscape Conservation Cooperative Network, will discuss the LCC Network's mission and objectives and the work of its partners. Learn more about the LCC Network at http://lccnetwork.org. This webinar is part of the Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Center's monthly webinar series. For a list of upcoming webinars and the latest eNewsletter see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs192/1103439157463/archive/1119517137277.html
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 February 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: The Ecology of Marine Life History Evolution: Anadromy, Hermaphroditism, and Anthropogenic Change
Presenter(s): Holly Kindsvater, Ph.D., NSF Postdoctoral Fellow, Simon Fraser University
Date & Time: 12 February 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Holly Kindsvater, Ph.D., NSF Postdoctoral Fellow, Simon Fraser University ABSTRACT Marine fishes are characterized by unique and complex life histories. Stage-structured life history models offer insight into why these life histories evolved, as well as the consequences of life history complexity for population dynamics. This talk will cover two taxa with especially unique life cycles, anadromous salmonids and protogynous groupers. Using theory and comparative data, I will propose the evolution of anadromy brought costs of reproduction that changed the egg size-number trade-off in the ancestoral Pacific salmon lineage. Again drawing from theory and data, I will show how the evolution of growth rate may be more important to population resilience than the evolution of sex change in protogynous (female first) hermaphrodites. These examples illustrate generally how the concept of reproductive value is fundamental to population resilience to anthropogenic change, and should be used more widely to guide our predictions of population declines or recovery. BIO Holly K Kindsvater is a marine evolutionary ecologist based in Vancouver, BC. She holds a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Yale University. She is currently an NSF postdoctoral fellow in Math and Biology, jointly appointed at Simon Fraser University and UC Santa Cruz. Her work combines the development of conceptual theory with the analysis of experimental and comparative data. WEBINAR Join Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw0401lsp12/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=nwfsc200&UUIDFromJAction=1838087607 Meeting number: 806 941 325 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Access code: 806 941 325 Need help joining? Contact Support https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw0401l/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=nwfsc200&service=1

18 February 2015

Title: Coral Reefs, Climate Change and Atomic Bombs
Presenter(s): Bob Richmond, Director of the Kewalo Marine Laboratory, University of Hawaii
Date & Time: 18 February 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Bob Richmond, Director of the Kewalo Marine Laboratory, University of Hawaii

Sponsor(s):


Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series and the NCCOS' Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR), Seminar Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please fill out the Mymeeting registration form before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

Abstract:
Coral reef worldwide are in decline as a result of human-induced disturbance, ranging from the common and chronic stressors of overfishing, coastal sedimentation and pollution to the absurd and acute: vaporization from nuclear testing. Global climate change is and will continue to be responsible for extensive reef losses through the associated problems of temperature-induced mass coral bleaching events, increased storm intensity and frequency, ocean acidification and sea level rise. To address human impacts in the hope of allowing coral reefs to persist into the future, it is necessary to both diagnose and treat the underlying problems at multiple levels over space (local, regional and global scales) and time. Emerging technologies in the areas of proteomics, genomics and transcriptomics provide new tools for better understanding relationships between stressors and coral reef responses with a higher level of resolution in determining the contributions of individual stressors in a multi-stressor system. The coral reef “sound and smell-scapes” also figure in to reef resilience and recovery. Better bridging of science to policy development, implementation and evaluation is needed to insure a legacy of functional coral reefs of high economic, ecological and cultural value for future generations.

Bio(s):
Dr. Richmond is the Director of the Kewalo Marine Laboratory at University of Hawaii. His career has taking him all over the world to study both how coral reefs function and how they respond to stressors. He combines both applied and basic research in his work and applies his results to both management and conservation. As such, he has consistently partnered with resource managers, elected officials, traditional leaders, and stakeholders both as co-investigators and as advisers. in addition, Dr. Richmond has given priority to mentoring and developing of students native to the Pacific Islands as an underrepresented group in the sciences.

24 February 2015

Title: Enterprising Women at Commerce series
Presenter(s): Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator
Date & Time: 24 February 2015
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: Commerce Research Library, HCHB, Room 1894 (DOC employees in the DC Metro area only)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars NOTE: This seminar is open to ALL DOC employees in the DC Metro area only This series is co-sponsored by the Office of Civil Rights, the Office of Public Affairs, and the Commerce Research Library.

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator Please join us for the next session of the monthly speaker series, Enterprising Women at Commerce. We are delighted to announce Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator, as our speaker. RSVP: http://doc.libcal.com/event/835619 or e-mail research@doc.gov About Dr. Sullivan Dr. Kathryn Sullivan is a distinguished scientist, renowned astronaut, and intrepid explorer. Her impressive expertise spans the frontiers of space and sea. An accomplished oceanographer, she was appointed NOAA's Chief Scientist in 1993, where she oversaw a research and technology portfolio that included fisheries biology, climate change, satellite instrumentation and marine biodiversity. She served in that role for 3 years then spent a decade as President and CEO of the Center of Science and Industry (COSI) in Columbus, Ohio, one of the nation's leading science museums. Over the years, she has held several other senior leadership positions in NOAA. Dr. Sullivan was one of the first six women selected to join the NASA astronaut corps in 1978 and holds the distinction of being the first American woman to walk in space. She flew on three shuttle missions during her 15-year tenure, including the mission that deployed the Hubble Space Telescope. She has also served on the National Science Board (2004-2010) and as an oceanographer in the U.S. Navy Reserve (1988-2006). She holds a bachelor's degree in earth sciences from the University of California at Santa Cruz and a doctorate in geology from Dalhousie University in Canada. To read more about Dr. Sullivan, please see her full biography. This program is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Sign Language interpretation will be provided. If you have any questions about this program, please contact Senora Coggs from the Office of Civil Rights at gcoggs@doc.gov or (202) 482-8190.
Title: Anticipating a Changing Climate: Adapting Traditional Ecological Calendars in the Pamir Mountains of Afghanistan-Tajikistan
Presenter(s): Rajul Pandya, Program Director, AGU's Thriving Earth Exchange
Date & Time: 24 February 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, SSMC#3, 2nd floor
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rajul (Raj) Pandya, Program Director, American Geophysical Union (AGU)'s Thriving Earth Exchange Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series

Remote Access:
Access is thru MyMeetings, which uses phone for audio and internet for visuals. Please fill out the registration form http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. If this is the first time you have used MyMeetings, leave time to download a small piece of software.

Abstract:
In the Pamir Mountains, which span the border between Afghanistan and Tajikistan, small-scale farmers and herders are key food producers. Traditionally, they have used calendars based on historical climate cues, such as first budding of a plant or the last day of snow cover, to anticipate weather patterns and coordinate planting and harvesting with seasonal cycles. The calendars vary from valley to valley because they are well tuned to small-scale elevation and geographic differences. As a result of colonialism and violent conflict throughout the twentieth century, the calendars fell out of use. How can we help farmers incorporate climate predictions into their traditional farming timing? To answer this question, AGU's Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX) is working with MIT's Climate Colab to host an online challenge. The goal of this challenge is to find ways to combine the villagers' traditional knowledge with scientific data in order to adapt the calendars and incorporate the effects of climate change. Click here for contest details. TEX connects scientists, communities, and sponsors and helps them work together to develop solutions that have local impact and global implications. TEX advances community science by providing tools to design and launch projects for community priorities in climate change, natural hazards and natural resources.

Bio(s):
Rajul (Raj) Pandya is the Program Director AGU's Thriving Earth Exchange. Prior to working with AGU, Raj worked as the Director of Education and Outreach at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Raj has been lucky enough to lead internships and mentor students, teach in college and high school, do research with communities internationally and in the US, and work on digital libraries. He has published in areas including thunderstorms, student learning, workforce development, diversity in science, citizen-science, and public health.

25 February 2015

Title: National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) Review
Presenter(s): National Severe Storms Laboratory leadership and research scientists
Date & Time: 25 February 2015
9:00 am - 7:00 pm ET
Location: National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
National Severe Storms Laboratory leadership and research scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research " Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and the National Severe Storms Laboratory Point of Contact: bridget.seegers@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
GotoWebinar is being used. FOR WEBCAST: 1. Go to: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5628876475584227330 2. Enter the required fields. 3. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) will be reviewed February 25-27, 2015 in Norman, OK. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Radar and Observations Technology; (2) Severe Weather Forecasts and Warnings; (3) Hydrometeorology and Flooding. OAR and NSSL leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the NSSL Laboratory Review website http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/about/events/review2015/
Title: The Tropopause Inversion Layer: What Can We Learn from Data Assimilation?
Presenter(s): Krzysztof Wargan, NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office
Date & Time: 25 February 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Center, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Krzysztof Wargan, NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office

Sponsor(s):
Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) Point of Contact: erin.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
FOR AUDIO: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557 International: 1-517-345-5260 FOR WEBCAST: 1. Go to https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/mw0401lsp12/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=star-nesdis-noaa 2. Enter the event number: 399 073 733 3. Enter the password: JCSDA 4. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Presentation slides will also be posted online prior to the presentation.

Abstract:
The Tropopause Inversion Layer (TIL) is a feature of the extratropical lower stratosphere characterized by a positive temperature lapse rate associated with a local maximum of static stability within a shallow layer directly above the tropopause. Its presence is evident in radiosonde data, Global Positioning System Radio Occultation measurements and general circulation models. Radiative and dynamical processes are likely to contribute to its formation but the mechanisms responsible for the feature are still being investigated. The importance of the TIL stems from the implications of near-tropopause static stability patterns for transport of trace gases and wave propagation. Older global atmospheric data assimilation systems produced only a weak TIL, in disagreement with observations. In this talk, we will demonstrate that the feature is well represented in the Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) analyses in terms of the season-dependent magnitude, vertical structure and extent, as permitted by the model resolution but there is a strong dependence of the analysis TIL on the observing system used. In particular, the insertion of conventional and hyperspectral radiance data such as from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument yields the most realistic representation of the tropopause static stability. In the second part of the talk we will discuss the connections between the middle atmosphere circulation and the variability of the TIL as seen in GEOS-5 analyses. We will focus on the impact of sudden stratospheric warming events on static stability above the wintertime polar tropopause.
Title: Addressing a Major Model Challenge: Improving the Representation of Clouds in Climate and Earth System Models
Presenter(s): Chris Golaz, NOAA GFDL, Steve Krueger, University of Utah, Roger Marchand, University of Washington
Date & Time: 25 February 2015
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Chris Golaz (NOAA GFDL), Steve Krueger (University of Utah), Roger Marchand (University of Washington) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=296249995 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: TBD
Title: Ocean Acidification: A Virtual Lab and Tangible Solution for High School Students
Presenter(s): Dr. Jason Hodin, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Insight to Student Environmental Action
Date & Time: 25 February 2015
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: virtual attendance only; registration info here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/290431963023220993
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jason Hodin, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/290431963023220993

Sponsor(s):
SOARCE webinar series, NOAA NMS and OAP Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.bennett@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The VirtualUrchin and Inquiry-to-Insight (I2I) teams at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) have developed "Our Acidifying Ocean", an interactive tutorial and virtual lab examining the impact of ocean acidification (OA) on the planktonic larva of the sea urchin. After coming to appreciate the problems and challenges posed by OA, students are then encouraged to participate in the International Student Carbon Footprint Challenge (ISCFC), where secondary/high school students worldwide calculate their location-calibrated individual footprints, and share what they learned and envision solutions on the project's micro-blogging platform. Our Acidifying Ocean and an expanded ISCFC will form part of the core of a newly funded project by the same team just getting underway called I2SEA: Inquiry to Student Environmental Action. I2SEA staff scientist and media designer Dr. Jason Hodin will lead an overview and walkthrough of these freely-available activities as well as the plans for the new project, with specific discussion of how to involve your students.
Title: National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) Review
Presenter(s): National Severe Storms Laboratory leadership and research scientists
Date & Time: 25 February 2015
11:30 pm - 9:30 am ET
Location: National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
National Severe Storms Laboratory leadership and research scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research " Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and the National Severe Storms Laboratory

Remote Access:
GotoWebinar is being used. FOR WEBCAST: 1. Go to: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5628876475584227330 2. Enter the required fields. 3. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) will be reviewed February 25-27, 2015 in Norman, OK. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Radar and Observations Technology; (2) Severe Weather Forecasts and Warnings; (3) Hydrometeorology and Flooding. OAR and NSSL leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the NSSL Laboratory Review website http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/about/events/review2015/ Point of Contact: bridget.seegers@noaa.gov

26 February 2015

Title: Diving into a Dream: The Exceptional Biological Communities of the Flower Garden Banks
Presenter(s): Randy Clark, Marine Biologist, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 26 February 2015
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Randy Clark, Marine Biologist, NOAA/NOS/NCCOS Biogeography Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet.Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# . Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 . No passcode needed for internet.

Abstract:
Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) is one of the least impacted, thriving coral reef ecosystems in the western Atlantic and Caribbean region. It does, however, face numerous pressures that should be recognized and responded to through informed management actions. In April of 2012, NOAA published an updated management plan for the sanctuary, representing over five years of data analysis and public participation to ensure a sound strategy for conserving and protecting sanctuary resources for the future. During the management plan review process, input on potential resource protection and management issues was collected and summarized. This process identified direct and indirect impacts of fishing activities as a priority issue for management attention. Hook and line fishing (both commercial and recreational) has always been allowed within the sanctuary. However, to better understand this and other management issues, enhanced biogeographic data are needed to determine the most appropriate management actions needed to fulfill the sanctuary goals and objectives. The sanctuary Management Plan proposes a research strategy that includes characterizing FGBNMS to obtain comprehensive baseline information on fish and benthic communities prior to any management action. A second component of the strategy includes utilizing a fully-protected research area to compare to areas where fishing and other activities occur.

Bio(s):
Randy has been a marine biologist with NOAA for 17 years. While working for NOAA he has conducted spatial assessments and characterizations of marine and estuarine resources throughout the Nations waters. His interests include fish populations and their relationships with benthic/pelagic habitats, fish diets and daily movements, developing monitoring programs and scuba diving.
Title: From the Forest to the Sea: Lessons in Managing Public Space
Presenter(s): Dr. Morgan Gopnik, Adjunct Professor, American University
Date & Time: 26 February 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Morgan Gopnik, PhD, Adjunct Professorial Lecturer, Department of Public Administration and Policy, American University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar; contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:
Please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
One of the most recent trends in ocean management has been the introduction of Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) as a means to reconcile multiple human objectives, including economic growth and ecosystem protection, within the government-controlled space known as the exclusive economic zone (EEZ). A very similar balancing act has been practiced for decades on U.S. public lands with varying degrees of success, so the possibility of learning from that history is intriguing. Three fundamental questions arise: Do public land and ocean settings share a similar set of governance characteristics? Do consistent themes or lessons emerge from the public lands history? Can those lessons be applied in the context of existing ocean laws, agencies, and stakeholders? In "From the Forest to the Sea: Public Lands Management and Marine Spatial Planning," Dr. Gopnik shows that the complex and frequently contentious story of the U.S. National Forests can be instructive to ocean managers. Based on a 4-year research effort grounded in the fundamentals of policy theory and supplemented by case studies, site visits, and dozens of confidential interviews, the analysis shows how land management approaches evolved over time and reveals the ambiguities and contradictions inherent in multiple-use management of any public space. The study's conclusions suggest that the ocean community including government, academia, industry, and environmental groups might achieve their individual and collective goals more effectively by looking to the experience of their land-based counterparts.

3 March 2015

Title: Economics of Hypoxia and Fisheries: Lessons from the Gulf of Mexico and North Carolina
Presenter(s): Martin D. Smith, Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief of the journal Marine Resource Economics, and a co-editor of the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists
Date & Time: 3 March 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Martin D. Smith, Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief of the Journal Marine Resource Economics, and a co-editor of the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series and National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research.contact is David.Kidwell@noaa.gov ; seminar point of contact is David.Moe.Nelson@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet.Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# . Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 . No passcode needed for internet.

Abstract:
Ecological shocks can threaten renewable resource extraction and flows of non-extractive ecosystem services. We show that resource prices can provide a signal of a major ecological disturbance that is otherwise difficult to detect in quantity data. Because ecological shocks can affect different sizes of organisms differently, they could induce relative price changes in resource products that are priced by size. Here, we analyze the Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery and a potential market regime shift triggered by the Gulf Dead Zone, a large seasonal area of hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) that coincides with the height of the shrimp season. Because hypoxia may alter the size structure of stocks and corresponding catches, periods with worse hypoxia will see relatively large catches of small shrimp and smaller catches of large shrimp. In contrast, recruitment shocks would tend to increase or decrease all size classes. We investigate these predicted quantity changes using treatment effects models and find a null result. We then develop a spatial-dynamic bioeconomic simulation model that reveals why causal inference statistical methods break down in spatial-dynamic systems. We then turn to market price data and harness market integration as a counterfactual. The rationale is that theoretical shifts in the size distribution of landings in response to hypoxia would alter relative prices in the presence of hypoxia, but relative prices to remain unchanged in the presence of recruitment variability attributable to other sources. Using monthly brown shrimp prices from January 1990 to March 2010, we find strong evidence that hypoxia induces relative price changes. The findings are robust to including fuel prices that may have altered the level and spatial distribution of fishing effort, seasonality, and sea surface temperature. Our analysis suggests that the industry is likely compensated partially through higher prices in bad hypoxic years. However, as imports rise, this price compensation may be dissipated.

5 March 2015

Title: Confronting Trade-Offs in Ecosystem Based Management of Forage Fish Fisheries
Presenter(s): Tim Essington, Ph.D., Professor, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 5 March 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tim Essington, Ph.D., Professor, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar JAM. POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov,

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw0401lsp12/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=nwfsc200&UUIDFromJAction=1838087607 Meeting number: 806 941 325 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Access code: 806 941 325 Need help joining: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw0401l/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=nwfsc200&service=1

Abstract:
Ecosystem " based management is important for fisheries that target small pelagic fishes because of the variety of services these populations provide. They are among the most productive fish stocks and support large-scale industrial and small scale fisheries. At the same time they are often a critical food source for a wide range of predators that people also value e.g. large fish for fisheries, sea birds, and marine mammals. Here I present two distinct explorations of small pelagic fish that provided advances in ecosystem-based management. First, I present a novel bioeconomic model that evaluates trade-offs between small pelagic fisheries catch and piscivorous fish catch, that can be parameterized to account for a nested series of ecological interactions between the two. We find that for most cases, optimal harvest policies that ignore species interactions would not lead to widespread loss of value in fisheries, but when piscivorous fishes are depleted applying the wrong harvest policy produces large damages to values. Second,I demonstrate that although natural population fluctuations are common, fishing acts to amplify troughs in population cycles, mainly by the inability to adequately respond to declines in stock productivity. Both case studies suggest that an ecosystem-based approach would be best served by applying risk-based control rules, that apply restrictions on fishing activities during periods when the risk of mis-management increase.

Bio(s):
Tim Essington is a Professor in the UW School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, where he also serves as the Associated Director, and the Director of the UW QERM graduate program. He is a fisheries ecologists interested in the interface between ecosystems and policy, and has conducted work on a wide range of marine systems and fishery types. He currently serves on the Marine Stewardship Council Technical Advisory Board and the Puget Sound Partnership science panel.

10 March 2015

Title: Understanding Rogue Waves: GPU Computing and Bred Vector Analysis
Presenter(s): B. Balachandran, Christopher Chabalko, and Eugenia Kalnay, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 10 March 2015
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminars

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar POC: Arun Chawla arun.chawla@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/639621317 (Long distance):+1 (657) 220-3412 Access Code: 639-621-317 More phone numbers: https://global.gotomeeting.com/639621317/numbersdisplay.html

Abstract:
Rogue waves, also referred to as extreme waves and freak waves, occur quite frequently in open seas. The formation of these waves can be influenced by a variety of interactions and phenomena, including wind interactions, focusing, and interactions with sea floor features. Efforts underway at the University of Maryland to further our understanding of rogue waves will be covered in this presentation. Studies conducted with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation will be discussed, and an eigenvalue map based predictor-corrector procedure developed by team members will be presented. The features of the predictive map will be explored and the influences of certain parameter variations will be examined. The solutions are rescaled to match the length scales of waves generated in a water tank. As a representative example, the solution framework is validated by using the Peregrine solution. Based on the information provided by the map and the details of physical scaling, it is believed that the framework presented here could serve as a basis for experimental investigations of a variety of rogue waves. The use of bred vectors to predict fluctuations associated with extreme waves will be presented. The results suggest that bred vectors may be used to predict energy localization associated with rogue waves.
Title: Ensemble data assimilation and model validation studies using cloud and water vapor sensitive infrared brightness temperatures
Presenter(s): Jason Otkin, SSEC, University of Wisconsin
Date & Time: 10 March 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
EMC Seminar

Presenter(s):
Jason Otkin, Univ of Wisconsin/SSEC POC: Geoff DiMego (geoff.dimego@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/639621317 You can also dial in using your phone. United States (Long distance): +1 (657) 220-3412 Access Code: 639-621-317 More phone numbers: https://global.gotomeeting.com/639621317/numbersdisplay.html

Abstract:
Infrared brightness temperatures provide valuable information about atmospheric water vapor, cloud cover, and surface properties, and thus are very useful for a wide variety of research purposes. In this presentation, results will be shown for several prior and ongoing studies that have used satellite observations to examine the accuracy of high-resolution numerical model simulations and to improve the analysis and forecast accuracy of regional forecast models through use of ensemble data assimilation systems. The impact of assimilating both clear and cloud-affected infrared brightness temperatures was assessed using regional-scale Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) with simulated GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) observations and through real data experiments using observations from the SEVIRI sensor onboard the Meteosat Second Generation satellite. Overall, the OSSE results showed that the assimilation of cloud-affected brightness temperatures had a large positive impact on the cloud and moisture analyses, with lesser or no impact on the wind and temperature analyses. Short-range precipitation forecasts for a high-impact weather event were greatly improved when cloudy observations were assimilated. For the real data experiments, observations from the SEVIRI 6.2 μm band that is sensitive to clouds and water vapor in the upper troposphere were assimilated. A bias correction scheme based on the observed and simulated cloud top pressure was also developed. The results showed that the biases were greatly reduced when the SEVIRI infrared observations were assimilated using the cloud-dependent bias correction scheme. Similar to the OSSE results, the largest improvements at the end of the assimilation period were observed in the relative humidity field, with lesser impact on the temperature and wind fields. Preliminary results will also be shown from two new model validation studies that will be used to examine the accuracy of the simulated cloud and water vapor fields in the operational High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) and Hurricane WRF (HWRF) models. A real-time GOES-based verification system is being developed for the HRRR model that will be used to provide forecasters objective guidance concerning which of the many overlapping forecasts at a given time is the most accurate based on quantitative comparison of the observed and simulated satellite imagery. Similar retrospective studies are being performed for different configurations of the HWRF model to assess the accuracy of the cloud and moisture fields.
Title: Past, present and future impacts of sea level rise and morphological changes on tidal hydrodynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Davina Passeri, PhD Candidate, University of Central Florida
Date & Time: 10 March 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Room 8150, 1305 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Davina Passeri, PhD Candidate, University of Central Florida

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series and National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research.contact is David.Kidwell@noaa.gov ; seminar point of contact is David.Moe.Nelson@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting number: 744925156; No passcode required for webinar.

Abstract:
Sea level rise (SLR) threatens coastal environments with loss of land, inundation of coastal wetlands, and increased flooding during storm events. To plan for changes under future sea levels, coastal managers need substantial information to make informed decisions for human and natural communities. Evaluating changes in tidal hydrodynamics under future scenarios is a key aspect for understanding the effects of SLR on coastal systems; tidal hydrodynamics influence inundation, circulation patterns, sediment transport processes, erosion of beach and estuarine shorelines and productivity of marshes and other biological species. This study evaluates the dynamic effects of SLR and morphologic changes on tidal hydrodynamics along the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) coast from Mississippi to the Florida panhandle, including three National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERRs), namely Grand Bay, MS, Weeks Bay, AL, and Apalachicola, FL. A large-scale hydrodynamic model is used to simulate astronomic tides under past (circa 1848), present (circa 2005), and future conditions (circa 2050 and 2100). The model is modified with specific sea levels, morphology, and shoreline positions that represent the conditions at each of the time periods. Past sea levels are determined based on mean sea level trends at nearby tidal gauges, and the current digital elevation model (DEM) is updated to represent past landscapes by removing features such as dredged shipping channels, altering depths according to historic bathymetry, recreating shorelines using historic shoreline data, and lowering marsh elevations. Future sea levels are determined using projections of SLR, and the DEM is updated from present conditions using a Bayesian Network to project future shoreline positions and dune heights under each SLR scenario. Past, present and future simulations illustrate the hydrodynamic response of the system to the changing landscape and permit examination of changes in variables such as tidal constituents, tidal range, tidal datums, circulation patterns and tidal velocities. This provides a better understanding of the physical processes of the current state of the NGOM, and gives insight as to how tidal hydrodynamics may be altered in the future.

Bio(s):
After receiving her bachelor's degree in Civil Engineering at the University of Notre Dame in 2010, Davina went to the University of Central Florida to pursue a PhD in Civil Engineering with Dr. Scott Hagen. Davina is currently a PhD Candidate and will be graduating in May 2015. Her research interests include large-scale coastal hydrodynamic modeling of astronomic tides and hurricane storm surge, and coastal response to sea level rise studies. Thus far, Davina's dissertation research has resulted in peer-reviewed journal articles, four of which she has been the first author, and two of which she has been a co-author. She is expecting to have one more manuscript completed by the time of her graduation. In addition, she has had the opportunity to present her research at numerous international conferences, most recently at the 11th International Conference on Hydroscience and Engineering in Hamburg, Germany. In July 2014, she won the award for Best Oral Presentation at the Young Coastal Scientists and Engineers Conference, North America at the University of Delaware.
Title: Icefield-to-Ocean Linkages Across the Northern Pacific Coastal temperate rainforest ecosystem
Presenter(s): Eran Hood, University of Alaska Southeast and Shad O'Neel, USGS Alaska Science Center
Date & Time: 10 March 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access (see login info below) or in person at ACCAP (930 Koyukuk Drive in Mather Library in the Akasofu Building, Fairbanks, AK)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Eran Hood, University of Alaska Southeast and Shad O'Neel, USGS Alaska Science Center

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinar; point of contact is contact Tina Buxbaum (907-474-7812 or tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

Remote Access:
Register at https://accap.uaf.edu/Ice_field_to_ocean_glaciers

Abstract:
Rates of glacier mass loss in the northern Pacific coastal temperate rainforest (PCTR) are among the highest on Earth, and changes in glacier volume and extent will impact the flow regime and chemistry of coastal rivers, as well as the nearshore marine ecosystem of the Gulf of Alaska. In this talk we will summarize the physical, chemical and biological linkages that characterize the northern PCTR ecosystem, with particular emphasis on the potential impacts of glacier change in the coastal mountain ranges on the surface-water hydrology, biogeochemistry, coastal oceanography and aquatic ecology.

11 March 2015

Title: From the Forest to the Sea: Lessons in Managing Public Space (TO BE RESCHEDULED)
Presenter(s): Dr. Morgan Gopnik, Adjunct Professor, American University
Date & Time: 11 March 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar TO BE RESCHEDULED

Presenter(s):
Morgan Gopnik, PhD, Adjunct Professorial Lecturer, Department of Public Administration and Policy, American University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar; contact Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:
Please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
One of the most recent trends in ocean management has been the introduction of Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) as a means to reconcile multiple human objectives, including economic growth and ecosystem protection, within the government-controlled space known as the exclusive economic zone (EEZ). A very similar balancing act has been practiced for decades on U.S. public lands with varying degrees of success, so the possibility of learning from that history is intriguing. Three fundamental questions arise: Do public land and ocean settings share a similar set of governance characteristics? Do consistent themes or lessons emerge from the public lands history? Can those lessons be applied in the context of existing ocean laws, agencies, and stakeholders? In "From the Forest to the Sea: Public Lands Management and Marine Spatial Planning," Dr. Gopnik shows that the complex and frequently contentious story of the U.S. National Forests can be instructive to ocean managers. Based on a 4-year research effort grounded in the fundamentals of policy theory and supplemented by case studies, site visits, and dozens of confidential interviews, the analysis shows how land management approaches evolved over time and reveals the ambiguities and contradictions inherent in multiple-use management of any public space. The study's conclusions suggest that the ocean community including government, academia, industry, and environmental groups might achieve their individual and collective goals more effectively by looking to the experience of their land-based counterparts.

Bio(s):
Dr. Morgan Gopnik is an expert on ocean and coastal policy, with a particular focus on marine spatial planning. She is an Adjunct Professor at American University in Washington, DC and works as a consultant to government agencies, foundations, industry groups, academic institutions, and nonprofit organizations. Dr. Gopnik served previously as Director of the Ocean Studies Board at the National Academy of Sciences, Senior Advisor to the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and Senior Vice President for Programs at the Ocean Conservancy. She holds a Ph.D. in Marine Science and Conservation from Duke University, a Masters degree in Environmental Engineering from Caltech, and a Bachelor of Science in Physical Geography from McGill University.

12 March 2015

Title: From "Big Data" to Actionable Information: Mitigation of Volcanic and Severe Weather Hazards
Presenter(s): Mike Pavolonis, Ph.D., Physical Scientist, NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research - STAR
Date & Time: 12 March 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC#3, NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, 2nd floor, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Mike Pavolonis, Ph.D., Physical Scientist, NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series; coordinator is Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
Volcanic and severe weather applications illustrate the importance of developing sophisticated, scientific, computer algorithms to convert extremely large volumes of environmental data into actionable information needed to help mitigate hazards and increase environmental intelligence. The need for science based computer algorithms has never been greater as data volumes and information content will increase significantly with NOAA's next generation of operational satellites, GOES-R and JPSS. Recent volcanic eruptions and the subsequent disruption of global air traffic have garnered considerable public attention. NOAA, in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, have developed innovative methods of detecting and characterizing volcanic ash clouds from space, and new satellite products are now used by Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) in the U.S., Australia, and elsewhere. The products are used to increase the timeliness and accuracy of volcanic ash advisories, which are used by air traffic controllers to divert aircraft around hazards. In addition, thunderstorms that produce large hail, damaging winds, and tornadoes are often difficult to forecast due to their rapid evolution and complex interactions with environmental features that are challenging to directly observe. To address this challenge NOAA and the University of Wisconsin developed a statistical, data driven, severe weather prediction model. The model, know as ProbSevere, utilizes satellite, radar, and numerical weather prediction data to determine the probability that a developing thunderstorm will produce severe weather. At NOAA's Hazardous Weather Testbed, ProbSevere was shown to increase the timeliness and accuracy of severe weather warnings. Beginning in the spring of 2015 several National Weather Service forecast offices will utilize ProbSevere in operations. Speaker's

Bio(s):
Michael J. Pavolonis, Ph.D., an award-winning physical scientist at NOAA's Satellite and Information Service, will receive the agency's prestigious David S. Johnson Award, which recognizes young scientists for their innovative use of environmental satellite data. He will receive the award March 13, 2015, at the 58th Annual Goddard Memorial Dinner in Washington, D.C. The NOAA-Johnson Award is named after the first assistant administrator of NOAA's Satellite and Information Service and honors professional scientists, who create new uses for observational satellite data to better predict atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial conditions. Dr. Pavolonis is being honored for developing cutting-edge methods to convert satellite data into actionable information for mitigating hazards caused by volcanic eruptions and severe convection. These new remote sensing techniques improve the timeliness and accuracy of volcanic ash cloud advisories and severe weather warnings. "The Johnson award spotlights exemplary work young scientists like Mike are performing with satellite data that help save lives, protect the economy and benefit society overall," said Dr. Stephen Volz, assistant administrator for NOAA's Satellite and Information Service. When he was in high school, two monster storms - the 1991 "Perfect Storm" and the 1993 "Super Storm - triggered Dr. Pavolonis' interest in atmospheric science. "Those storms had major impacts and I was intrigued to learn how they formed," Dr. Pavolonis recalled. A prolific writer, Dr. Pavolonis has contributed to 32 scientific papers on topics ranging from volcanic ash and dust clouds, to researching better ways to track and forecast ash plumes. "Having this research recognized for its potential to improve operational products and services means a great deal to me," Dr. Pavolonis said. "The award serves as inspiration to continue to push the envelope in using science to transform satellite measurements into very useable information." The Kingston, Pa., native He received a bachelor's degree in meteorology from Pennsylvania State University in 2000, and both his M.S. and Ph.D. in atmospheric and oceanic sciences from the University of Wisconsin in 2002 and 2014, respectively.
Title: Climate Smart Adapation: Vulnerability Assessment Results and Next Steps for the North-Central California Coast and Ocean
Presenter(s): Sara Hutto, Ocean Climate Specialist, Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 12 March 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description for login info.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sara Hutto, Ocean Climate Specialist, Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6240120277942877697

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series which is co-sponsored with EBM Tools Network. The series is focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. For a list of upcoming webinars see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Learn how the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary MPA is planning for climate-smart adaptation and how you might be able to use the same approach. Sara Hutto will present the Vulnerability Assessment Results for 40 species, habitats and ecosystem services in the North-central California region. Application of the vulnerability assessment, scenario planning, and the formation of a working group to develop adaptive management recommendations will also be discussed. To learn more about how the assessment was conducted, see the August 2014 webinar presentation, "A Climate-Smart Approach to Adaptive Management of North-central California Coast and Ocean Resources". http://openchannels.org/webinars/2014/climate-smart-approach-adaptive-management-north-central-california-coast-and-ocean
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 March 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Oyster breeding mixed up: A new spin on old science
Presenter(s): Sean Matson, PhD
Date & Time: 12 March 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sean Matson, PhD

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar JAM. POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov,

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw0401lsp12/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=nwfsc200&UUIDFromJAction=1838087607 Meeting number: 806 941 325 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Access code: 806 941 325 Need help joining: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw0401l/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=nwfsc200&service=1

Abstract:
The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) supports a major industry on the West Coast of the U.S. and around the world. Research on selective breeding is a critical component for keeping the industry viable, for applications such as increasing yields and developing disease resistant genotypes. In this work, we developed mixed-family selection methods for Pacific oysters using marker-based pedigree reconstruction. We focused on (1) improving the efficiency of parentage assignment by developing novel software, (2) determining the optimum life stage to mix oyster families for rearing and selection, (3) comparing mixed-family and separate-family selective breeding methods in the field, and (4) applying the mixed method to estimate heritability of shell shape.

Bio(s):
Dr. Matson is a Fishery Management Analyst for the NMFS West Coast Regional Office, in the Sustainable Fisheries Division. He received BSc and MSc in Fisheries from the University of Washington, and Ph.D. in Animal Sciences focusing on quantitative genetics from Oregon State University. Dr. Matson is quantitative scientist whose research has spanned from genetics and evolution, to ecological modelling and population dynamics, and to management and assessment of groundfish stocks. He has been an author in a number of research publications in highly-ranked scientific journals. His current work focuses on providing guidance to the Pacific Fishery Management Council on inseason and biennial management of commercial groundfish fisheries, and he is a technical advisor to the Council's Groundfish Management Team. He is also a United States Army veteran of Operation Desert Storm.

17 March 2015

Title: New applications of data assimilation: Observation and model improvements, strongly coupled ocean-atmosphere data assimilation, and surface flux estimations
Presenter(s): Eugenia Kalnay, UMD College Park
Date & Time: 17 March 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC Seminar

Presenter(s):
Eugenia Kalnay, UMCP POC: Glenn While glenn.white@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/407467325 (Long distance): +1 (571) 317-3131 Access Code: 407-467-325 More phone numbers: https://global.gotomeeting.com/407467325/numbersdisplay.html Titile:New applications of data assimilation: Observation and model improvements, strongly coupled ocean-atmosphere data assimilation, and surface flux estimations Contributors:E. Kalnay, J. Carton, S. Penny, T. Sluka, T.-S Chen, M. Wespetal, (UMD), T. Miyoshi, G.-Y. Lien (RIKEN), D. Hotta (JMA), J.-S. Kang (KIAPS), S.-C. Yang

Abstract:
The data assimilation cycle used for numerical weather prediction (NWP) interpolates a short model forecast and the new observations to create new initial conditions (analysis) for integrating the model through the next cycle. Thus, improvements in NWP have been considered to require improvements in the model, observing systems and in the statistical interpolation scheme. Recently, however, it has become clear that with advanced methods of data assimilation, such as 4DVar and EnKF, the analysis cycle can be also applied in new areas: improving the models, observations, assimilation of new observing systems, and flux estimations. It is plausible that these may become the main tools to develop and improve Earth System models, observation forward models, quality control, and estimation of surface fluxes. We will present examples of these new applications: Strongly coupled data assimilation, optimal estimation of model parameters or surface fluxes by state augmentation, model improvements through the use of analysis increments, use of Ensemble Forecast Sensitivity to Observations (EFSO) to detect flawed observations that make the 6hr forecast worse (Proactive QC), and its application to estimate the observations Error Covariance R, and efficient operational implementation of new observing systems.
Title: Physically based data assimilation and fuzzy verification
Presenter(s): Dr. Gad Levy, NorthWest Research Associates
Date & Time: 17 March 2015
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2551
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar POC: Avichal Mehra avichal.mehra@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
GoToMeeting - MMAB (Mehra) https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/599995453 Meeting ID: 599-995-453 Dial in: 866-685-5896 Access code: 8108134#

Abstract:
Ideally, a verification and validation scheme should be able to evaluate and incorporate lower dimensional features (e.g., discontinuities) contained within a bulk simulation even when not directly observed or represented by model variables. Nonetheless, lower dimensional features are often ignored. Conversely, models that resolve such features and the associated physics well, yet imprecisely are penalized by traditional validation schemes. This can lead to (perceived or real) poor model performance and predictability and can become deleterious in model improvements when observations are sparse, fuzzy, or irregular. I present novel algorithms and a general framework for using information from available satellite data through fuzzy verification that efficiently and effectively remedy the known problems mentioned above. As a proof of concept, we use a sea-ice model with remotely sensedobservations of leads in a one-step initialization cycle. Using the new scheme in a sixteen day simulationexperiment introduces model skill (against persistence) several days earlier than in the control run, improves the overall model skill and delays its drop off at later stages of the simulation. Although sea-ice models are currently a weak link in climate models, the appropriate choice of data to use, and the fuzzy verification and evaluation of a system's skill in reproducing lower dimensional features are important beyond the initial application to sea ice. Our strategy and framework for fuzzy verification, selective use of information, and feature extraction could be extended globally and to other disciplines. As time permits, examples from tropical climate classification, oil spill detection and modeling will also be presented.
Title: Update on NOAA Opportunities for Graduate and Undergraduate Students
Presenter(s): Marlene Kaplan, NOAA Education Deputy Director
Date & Time: 17 March 2015
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5744152573664358658
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Marlene Kaplan, NOAA Education Deputy Director Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5744152573664358658

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Service Office of Science and Technology Point of Contact: Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov Abstract NEW Pilot NOAA-NSF Graduate Research Internship Program will allow NSF Graduate Research Fellows to conduct internships at NOAA. NSF will provide the student a stipend and $5,000 for travel or research supplies. This will allow NMFS (and other line office) staff to acquire top notch graduate fellows for internship opportunities at little or no cost to the host office. The NOAA Office of Education is seeking internship opportunities for graduate students for the new NSF-funded program, as well as for students supported through NOAA's Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI). NOAA Education Deputy Director Marlene Kaplan will provide an overview of the new NOAA-NSF Graduate Research Internship Program and other NOAA internship programs. The webinar will be focused on connections to NMFS but any participants are welcome to attend.

18 March 2015

Title: Estuarine Acidification: A Conceptual Discussion with Examples
Presenter(s): Dr. Wei-Jun Cai, Professor, College of Earth, Ocean & Environment, University of Delaware
Date & Time: 18 March 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual attendance only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1728565684810801921
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Wei Jun-Cai, College of Earth, Ocean & Environment, University of Delaware Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1728565684810801921

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov Abstract Wei-Jun Cai will discuss how estuarine pH is affected by mixing between riverine and anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) enriched seawater and by respiration under various conditions (salinity, temperature and river end-member alkalinity). A few rivers with different levels of weathering products and temperature are selected for the discussion. It is shown here that estuaries receiving low to moderate levels of weathering products exhibit maximum pH decrease in mid-salinity region as a result of anthropogenic CO2 intrusion. Such maximum pH decrease coincides with a mid-salinity minimum buffer zone. In addition, water column oxygen consumption can further depress pH for all simulated estuaries. Recognition of the estuarine minimum buffer zone may be important for studying estuarine calcifying organisms and pH-sensitive biogeochemical processes.
Title: Modeling the Stratosphere: Ozone, Reanalysis, Predictability, and connections with the Troposphere
Presenter(s): Ming Cai, Florida State University, Judith Perlwitz, NOAA ESRL, Larry Horowitz, NOAA GFDL
Date & Time: 18 March 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Ming Cai (Florida State University), Judith Perlwitz (NOAA ESRL), Larry Horowitz (NOAA GFDL) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA, OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar Point of Contact: Daniel.Barrie@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=290233212 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx

Abstract:
TBD
Title: The Past, Present and Future of Federal Ecosystem-based Management
Presenter(s): Andrew Rosenberg, PhD, Director, Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists
Date & Time: 18 March 2015
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC3, Room 4527, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Andrew Rosenberg, PhD, Director, Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Ecosystem-Based Management Seminar Series Seminar Point of Contact: Adam Fullerton, Adam.Fullerton@noaa.gov, 301-427-8793 Remote Access Information: Webex URL: https://noaaevents3.webex.com/noaaevents3/onstage/g.php?d=994569855&t=a Event Password: 0000 Audio Dial in: Audio Dial-in: 888-469-0570, Participant Passcode: 7231723

Abstract:
The current and future environmental challenges facing ocean, coastal, and great lakes ecosystems require a broad management approach that considers cumulative impacts on marine environments; an approach that works across sectors to manage species and habitats, economic activities, conflicting uses, and the sustainability of resources. We call this approach ecosystem-based management (EBM). This presentation will introduce the concept of EBM, look at current EBM efforts, and give recommendations on how to expand and improve the use of EBM in the future. Specific attention will be given to the report and recommendations from the Ocean Research Advisory Panel on Implementing Ecosystem-Based Management, and recommendations for federal agencies to advance the integration of EBM their management activities. Speaker

Bio(s):
Andrew A. Rosenberg is director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists. Dr. Rosenberg came to UCS from Conservation International, where he served for two years as senior vice president and chief scientist. Previously, he served as the northeast regional administrator of the National Marine Fisheries Service at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. He later became deputy director of the service. Dr. Rosenberg received his Ph.D. in biology from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada and previously studied oceanography at Oregon State University and fisheries biology at the University of Massachusetts.

23 March 2015

Title: ATMS Derived Snowfall Rates to Support Weather Forecasting
Presenter(s): Huan Meng, NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research - STAR
Date & Time: 23 March 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building, 8th Floor Conference Room,10210 Greenbelt Rd., Lanham, MD 20706 and Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
JPSS / GOES-R Proving Ground Seminar

Presenter(s):
Huan Meng, NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) POC: Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Conference #: 877-401-9225 passcode: 53339716 Webex: Topic: JPSS Science Seminar Date: Monday, March 23, 2015 Time: 12:00 pm, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00) Meeting Number: 744 351 610 Meeting Password: Jpss2015! ------------------------------------------------------- To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!) ------------------------------------------------------- 1. Go to https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mee3b65235d72270b6a431921e06001f0 2. If requested, enter your name and email address. 3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: Jpss2015! 4. Click "Join"

Abstract:
Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles, and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are the Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) aboard S-NPP and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) aboard POES and Metop satellites. ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm was developed in a project supported by the JPSS PGRR program. Much improvement has been made since the original ATMS SFR algorithm was developed. A major advancement is the addition of a cold temperature component for snowfall detection. It extends the 2-meter temperature low limit for SFR from about 22°F to about 7°F, and drastically increases the probability of detection of snowfall in colder weather. Other algorithm development includes increasing accuracy of snowfall rate retrieval by taking into account snow microphysics and performing histogram matching with radar and gauge snowfall data. The ATMS SFR, along with AMSU/MHS SFR, is being evaluated at several NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) in operational environment. This is a collaborative effort by NOAA, NASA SPoRT, and Cooperative Institute of Climate and Satellites (CICS) at University of Maryland. Feedback from a previous assessment of AMSU/MHS SFR indicated that latency was a major factor limiting the application of SFR in operations. Consequently, the project team developed the capability to utilize Direct Broadcast (DB) data for the SFR assessment this year. A processing system was built to acquire DB ATMS Level-1B data from University of Wisconsin and University of Alaska, retrieve SFR product, post product image on the project webpage, and send the SFR data to SPoRT within 30 minutes of satellite observation. SPoRT reformats the data to AWIPS/ AWIPS II and disseminates the product to WFOs via LDM. The project team collaborated with SPoRT to develop SFR training materials and conduct teletraining sessions prior to the product evaluation period. The presentation will include some case studies with forecaster feedback on the usefulness of the product and on issues that require future development.
Title: The Chesapeake Bay Ecological Assessment Program: linking land-use to fisheries-based ecosystem services
Presenter(s): Lonnie Gonsalves, Ph.D.Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, NOAA's National Ocean Service
Date & Time: 23 March 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA, SSMC3, Rm 9836, 1315 Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lonnie Gonsalves, Ph.D., Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, NOAA's National Ocean Service Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology; point of contact is Stephen.K.Brown@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/r79aggzv29c/ Dial in: 877-984-9436 Passcode: 8591340

Abstract:
Development within estuarine watersheds induces a suite of environmental stressors that impact fish habitat and ecosystem services. To better characterize these stressors in the Chesapeake Bay, we conducted an ecosystem assessment covering six small watersheds with variable land use patterns (agricultural, suburban, and mixed-use). Water quality data along with a range of organismal health indicators was collected spring, summer, and fall over six years. Several responses followed predictable trends, such as poor benthic community condition in the suburban system. Less obvious were findings that indicated there may be tradeoffs in the response of some organisms to stressors. For example, fish abundance and fish health were inversely related, with high abundances and poor condition in the agricultural watershed and the opposite occurring in the urbanized watershed. Our findings agree with past studies that demonstrate greater impacts to habitat condition in small, headwater tributaries closer to sources of land-based stressors relative to the main stem. The results of these studies are being used to direct science in NOAA's Choptank Habitat Focus Area. A major component of these efforts is to determine how habitat in the watershed relates to the health of key fish and shellfish species of high socioeconomic value. This presentation will be used to share the results from the previous ecosystem assessment study, preview planned FY15-FY17 science activities, and broker discussion on how these results can be integrated into a socioeconomics framework.

Bio(s):
Dr. Lonnie Gonsalves is a research ecologist for the NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). His research focuses on characterizing the health of estuarine and coastal habitats in relation to anthropogenic stress and other environmental factors. This work utilizes biochemical and molecular indicators to monitor aquatic animal health, assess habitat quality, and detect ecosystem change. Lonnie is stationed at the Cooperative Oxford Lab (COL) located on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay in the town of Oxford, MD. An alumni of the NOAA Graduate Sciences Program (c/o 2010), Lonnie has remained engaged in the NOAA Educational Partnership Program (EPP) and has successfully utilized EPP-supported graduate and undergraduate students to build science capacity at COL. He has taken a lead role in fostering connections between NCCOS and ECSC researchers with the goal of aligning ECSC graduate students to projects at the forefront of the NCCOS science portfolio. Dr. Gonsalves completed his doctoral degree at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore in 2012. He received his B.S. in Biology at East Carolina University in 2005. A native of eastern North Carolina, Lonnie enjoys the ample opportunities for fishing, biking, and beach days afforded by life on the eastern shore of Maryland and the Delaware coast.

25 March 2015

Title: Ocean Acidification - A Collaborative Response at Seattle Aquarium
Presenter(s): Nicole Killebrew, Seattle Aquarium
Date & Time: 25 March 2015
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual attendance only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/688511247988086786
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Nicole Killebrew, Interpretation Coordinator and Scientific Diver at Seattle Aquarium Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/688511247988086786

Sponsor(s):
Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources with Communicators and Educators (SOARCE), co-hosted by NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov Abstract Nicole Killebrew will share the integrated approach the Seattle Aquarium uses to convene educational outreach and scientific expertise around ocean acidification. This webinar will address best practices for Ocean Acidification interpretation including a pilot presentation called Visualizing Change. She will also explore current efforts to build capacity around strategic framing communication skills among scientists and educators, the Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE pH Sensor competition and the importance of using narrative to improve ocean literacy.

26 March 2015

Title: Energy Innovation and the Marine Environment: Finfish and Tidal Power in Cobscook Bay, Maine
Presenter(s): Jeffrey D. Vieser, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 26 March 2015
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, 2nd Floor
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jeffrey D. Vieser, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series/Knauss Fellows Lecture Series Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library or Wessley.Merten@noaa.gov, Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection

Remote Access:


Remote Access:
Please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
Cobscook Bay, Maine is a macrotidal embayment on the U.S. - Canadian border where, in 2012, the Western Hemisphere's first grid-connected in-stream tidal power turbine was deployed. A suite of environmental monitoring activities accompanied this deployment to assess its potential impacts and enable informed decision-making by relevant stakeholders regarding this new technology. One focus of these monitoring activities was to investigate how a tidal turbine would affect finfish. A combination of hydroacoustics and direct netting activities was used to describe Cobscook Bay's finfish assemblage composition, document the distribution of finfish throughout the water column (i.e., their likelihood of encountering the tidal turbine), and record the interactions between finfish and a test turbine. A total of 46 species and over 60,000 individual fish were captured while netting. Finfish were found to be concentrated near the sea floor, below the height of the turbine, with some seasonal differences. The study of fish behavior near a test turbine at the surface documented various interactions, especially during night at slack tide and within the wake of the turbine. Note: The Knauss Lecture Series features current 2015 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows.

Bio(s):
Jeff is a current Knauss fellow at the NOAA Fisheries' Office of Science and Technology working in stock assessments. He is working on a variety of national initiatives that involve how stock assessments are conducted, evaluated, and reported. Jeff grew up in central New Jersey and was a frequent visitor to the shore throughout his childhood. His time there fishing and enjoying the beach drove him to obtain his B.S. in Biological Science and Marine Science from Rutgers University in 2010. After a year gathering experience with the NY/NJ Baykeeper and AmeriCorps, Jeff decided to further his education at the University of Maine. He successfully defended his thesis, “Collaborative Research on Finfish, Their Distribution, and Diversity in Cobscook Bay, Maine,” in the summer of 2014, receiving dual M.S. degrees in Marine Biology and Marine Policy.
Title: The Effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas on Conserving the Fish Population in the Gulf of Aqaba, Egypt
Presenter(s): Ayman Mabrouk, NOAA National Ocean Service, Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 26 March 2015
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ayman Mabrouk, NOAA National Ocean Service, Biogeography Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series/Knauss Fellows Lecture Series Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library or Wessley.Merten@noaa.gov, Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection

Remote Access:


Remote Access:
Please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
Marine Protected Areas have been used globally as an effective tool to maintain coral reef fisheries and conserve fish populations. This study investigated the role of the Marine Protected Areas in changing fish diversity, density, and size of 9 families over 10 years (2002-2012) of conservation efforts in the Gulf of Aqaba. Four regions were studied, with different level of protection and fishing pressure. We found that the un-fished regions (Ras Mohamed and Sharm El Sheikh) were more abundant in total species and significantly by 2012, while Dahab significantly increased in both total species and diversity. Nabq and carnivore species were significantly decreased over time with Nabq and Dahab having the smallest fish sizes by the end of our study. Fishing pressure has been increasing in Nabq and affecting the fish population dramatically, due to pressure from Dahab fishers and non-compliance by fishing in the No Take Zones. Even in the Ras Mohamed National Park, fishing occurred causing a decline in abundance of target species. Ensuring long-term effective law enforcement is critical for the MPAs to maintain and conserve the fish populations in the Gulf of Aqaba. Tourism development and public awareness can also play a role in reducing fishing pressure, increasing fish abundance, and maintaining fish diversity. Note: The Knauss Lecture Series features current 2015 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows.

Bio(s):
Born in Port Said, Egypt 1972. Graduate from the Suez Canal University, Ismailia 1993 as Marine Biologist. I got my Ph.D. in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University 2014 on “ THE ROLE OF MARINE PROTECTED AREAS IN MAINTAINING SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES IN THE EGYPTIAN GULF OF AQABA, RED SEA”. Worked for the national parks of Egypt, Nature Conservation Sector NCS /Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs from 1995- 2009, started with environmental researcher, Manager of Nabq Protected Area, then Manager of the South Sinai Protectorates Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, Egypt. From 2009 to 2010 was the Assistant Director for Nature Conservation Sector in Cairo. Responsible for develop and implement the strategic management plan for conserving the Egyptian Red Sea, and mentored Egypt's Marine Protected Areas MPAs managers and assessed the performance of these MPAs (178360 mi²) in conserving the marine resources.

30 March 2015

Title: Lab Review: Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Chemical Sciences Division (CSD)
Presenter(s): Bridget Seegers, PhD, Knauss Fellow in the Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes in NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 30 March 2015
9:00 am - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
ESRL's Chemical Sciences Division leadership and research scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research " Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and the Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Chemical Sciences Division (CSD)

Remote Access:
GotoWebinar is being used. FOR WEBCAST: 1. Go to: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3167461367614285057 2. Enter the required fields. 3. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) will be reviewed March 30-31, 2015 in Boulder, CO. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Climate Research (including Stratospheric Research); (2) Air Quality Research; (3) Connections: Climate, Air Quality, and the Stratosphere. OAR and CSD leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the CSD Laboratory Review website http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/csd/reviews/2015/ Point of Contact: bridget.seegers@noaa.gov

31 March 2015

Title: Lab Review: Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Chemical Sciences Division (CSD)
Presenter(s): Bridget Seegers, PhD, Knauss Fellow in the Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes in NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 31 March 2015
9:00 am - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
ESRL's Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) leadership and research scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research " Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and the Chemical Sciences Division (CSD)

Remote Access:
GotoWebinar is being used. FOR WEBCAST: 1. Go to: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3588042157424686593 2. Enter the required fields. 3. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Point of Contact: bridget.seegers@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) will be reviewed March 30-31, 2015 in Boulder, CO. The review will examine the following research areas: (1) Climate Research (including Stratospheric Research); (2) Air Quality Research; (3) Connections: Climate, Air Quality, and the Stratosphere. OAR and CSD leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in each of the above research areas. The review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the CSD Laboratory Review website http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/csd/reviews/2015/
Title: Best practices for use of Durafet autonomous pH sensors
Presenter(s): Dr. Todd Martz, Assistant Professor, Scripps Institute of Oceanography
Date & Time: 31 March 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual Attendance Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Todd Martz, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, with perspective offered by Benoit Eudeline of Taylor Shellfish Space is limited. n

Sponsor(s):
California Current Acidification Network Ocean Acidification Roundtable (C-CAN OAR) webinar series Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor (ISFET) pH sensors have been found to be stable and accurate for monitoring fine-scale changes in pH. As such, they are becoming widely-accepted for ocean and nearshore monitoring of high frequency variability in pH. C-CAN's efforts to develop a coordinated monitoring program documenting changing ocean chemistry have led to a growing number of non-specialist users who are adopting ISFET sensors for continuous, autonomous measurement of pH, exposing a need for coordinated best practices for deployment and assessing data intercomparability across users, which is crucial to interpreting data from a network of sites. Toward that end, C-CAN commissioned Dr. Todd Martz (Scripps Institution of Oceanography) to lead an effort for defining best practices for deployment of ISFET sensors. This webinar will describe those recommended protocols. Todd's presentation will be followed by Dr. Benoit Eudeline (Taylor Shellfish) providing an industry perspective on use of ISFET sensors and the recommended deployment practices.

1 April 2015

Title: Automatic Optimization of WRF Model Parameters
Presenter(s): Qingyun Duan, Beijing Normal University
Date & Time: 1 April 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar POC Jun Du, Jun.du.@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/196065445 You can also dial in using your phone. United States (Long distance): +1 (571) 317-3112 Access Code: 196-065-445 More phone numbers: https://global.gotomeeting.com/196065445/numbersdisplay.html

Abstract:
Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is a community numerical weather prediction (NWP) model widely used by many researchers and practitioners in the world. There are three ways to improve the performance of the WRF model. The first way is to improve the parameterization schemes for different physical processes, including radiation, cumulous cloud, microphysics, surface and boundary layers and land surface. The second way is to obtain the most accurate and reliable boundary and initial conditions with new observational technologies and data assimilation techniques. The third way is to enhance the estimation of parameters present in the WRF model. This study concerns with the estimation of the parametric uncertainty of the WRF model. We identified a list of over 20 parameters which are thought to be influential in the performance of the WRF model in forecasting precipitation and temperature. A global sensitivity analysis is first used to screen out the most sensitive parameters. Then we explore the use of surrogate modeling approach to identify the optimal parameters for the screened parameters. The numerical case study is set for the North China domain surrounding the Beijing city area. The WRF model will be run at 9km spatial resolution. The forecast lead time is set to 5 days. We have selected 9 different storms over the summer months (June/July/August) over the 2008-2010 period to study the effect of parametric uncertainty on predictive skill of precipitation and surface temperature forecasts. This presentation will show the preliminary results from this study.

2 April 2015

Title: Salmon-fueled ecosystems of the Great Bear Rainforest
Presenter(s): John Reynolds, Ph.D. Professor, Simon Fraser University
Date & Time: 2 April 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John Reynolds, Ph.D. Professor, Simon Fraser University

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov ABSTRACT Salmon have variable impacts on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. Although they import nutrients to these systems through release of eggs and decomposition of their carcasses, they also scour substrates and cause localized export of nutrients. Our research on species ranging from biofilm to birds in the Great Bear Rainforest of coastal British Columbia shows the role of salmon in freshwater and terrestrial communities, as well as the mediating effects of habitats. These findings, combined with results of other published studies, reveal opportunities and challenges for incorporating salmon into ecosystem-based management. Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=309684282&UID=1838089107&RT=MiM0 Meeting Number: 802 868 564 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 802 868 564 Global call-in numbers: Global call-in number BIO Dr. John Reynolds is a professor at Simon Fraser University, where he holds the Tom Buell BC Leadership Chair in Salmon Conservation. He has held a variety of scientific advisory positions, including co-chairing the marine fish committee of COSEWIC, the advisory committee for Canada's Species at Risk Act. He has published five books on ecology and conservation, and was recently awarded the Newman Award for Research from the Vancouver Aquarium. RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS/WEBSITES http://johnreynolds.org/

7 April 2015

Title: Understanding Larval Bivalve Responses to Ocean Acidification
Presenter(s): Dr. George Waldbusser, Assistant Professor, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences,Oregon State University
Date & Time: 7 April 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual attendance only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3887482054885276674
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
George Waldbusser, Oregon State University

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3887482054885276674

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Bivalve larvae have been noted as the canaries in the coal mine of ocean acidification, and are the only commercially important organisms that have been documented in a commercial setting to be responsive to current day changes to marine carbonate chemistry. One of the challenges of understanding organismal responses to ocean acidification is aligning the variable conditions in coastal environments with responses. It has been assumed that since certain organisms are found in variable environments, they must be pre-adapted to withstand the entire range of conditions of a given environment, however decades of work on coastal marine organism recruitment highlights the importance of timing of conditions to critical life history stages. I will present results from hatchery and laboratory based research that shows the timing of this critical stage for bivalve larvae, the mechanisms for their sensitivity, traits that may convey resiliency, and discuss our group's findings in the context of variable coastal marine systems.

8 April 2015

Title: Eutrophication & Shellfish Aquaculture: Shellfish can help the Bay!
Presenter(s): Dr. Suzanne Bricker, NCCOS/CCMA/COAST - Coastal Ocean Assessment and Status and Trends Branch
Date & Time: 8 April 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Suzanne Bricker, Ph.D., NCCOS/CCMA/COAST - Coastal Ocean Assessment and Status and Trends Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 . No passcode required for web.

Abstract:
Eutrophication is among the most serious threats worldwide to the function and services supported by coastal ecosystems. Impacts such as hypoxic bottom waters and loss of valuable habitats can have cascading impacts on resources such as fisheries and aquaculture. Legislation aimed at reducing these impacts includes the US Clean Water Act and EU Water Framework Directive, which focus on reductions of land-based nutrient sources (e.g. wastewater discharges, fertilizer). These measures spurred the widespread improvement of wastewater treatment and other point sources in many regions which are less expensive and less complicated to address than non-point sources, but there is increasing recognition that return on investment diminishes when approaching limits of technology. Furthermore, as point sources become less important, an increasing fraction of nutrients comes from diffuse sources such as fertilizer which require additional management options. The focus of this project was quantification of the ecosystem service of nitrogen removal provided by shellfish at present harvest rates and potential increases under scenarios of expanded production in Long Island Sound and the Great Bay/Piscataqua Region Estuaries. Shellfish filter phytoplankton and detritus from the water, short-circuiting organic degradation and consequent effects on bottom-water hypoxia. Shellfish remove nutrients by sequestration into tissue and shell and through denitrification. When shellfish are harvested, nutrients contained in shell and tissue are removed directly from the nearshore environment. Recent research has shown that nutrient removal efficiencies through shellfish aquaculture compare favorably with removal by existing agricultural and stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs). Shellfish cultivation and harvest are presently being evaluated as means of sustainable domestic production, while also providing water quality improvements, by NOAA's 2009 Aquaculture Policy and National Shellfish Initiative, and locally through policies such as the 2009 Maryland Shellfish Aquaculture Plan. This research contributes to the ongoing discussion in the US and elsewhere on the feasibility and potential value of nutrient removal through shellfish cultivation which increases the capacity of a waterbody to assimilate nutrients while complementing traditional land-based reductions.

Bio(s):
Dr. Suzanne Bricker of NOAA's NCCOS Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment received a BA in Biology from Northwestern University and a PhD in Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island. For the past 25 years she has been involved in development and application of assessment methods for determining the impact of nutrients on estuarine and coastal water bodies as lead for NOAA's National Estuarine Eutrophication Assessment. The intent is to provide resource managers with the data and information they need to manage coastal resources successfully. Through collaborative work, she and her colleagues were able to demonstrate that this global problem has similar and predictable symptoms throughout the world. Most recently her work has included pursuit of alternative management measures, such as shellfish aquaculture, that complement traditional land-based management measures. For additional information go to http://www.eutro.org, http://www.eutro.org/register, http://www.eutro.us, www.farmscale.org .
Title: Understanding the reproductive ecology of Gulf of Maine cod through passive and active acoustics
Presenter(s): Micah Dean, Mass. Dept. Mar. Fish.
Date & Time: 8 April 2015
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Clark Conference Room, NEFSC, 166 Water St., Woods Hole, MA.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Micah Dean, Massachusetts Department of Marine Fisheries

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Point of contact: Mike Jech, michael.jech@noaa.gov Remote access login: Meeting Name: Joint NEFSC-WHOI Seminar 5 Teleconference Number(s): 866-658-7997 Participant Code: 4319624 To join the meeting: https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/nefsc-whoi-5/ Audio is only available via the teleconference!

Abstract:
Atlantic cod were once abundant and broadly distributed along the entire GOM coast, supporting fisheries from numerous small ports ranging from Canada to Massachusetts. Unsustainable levels of exploitation resulted in the loss of many discrete spawning groups. Efforts are underway to protect the few known remaining spawning groups; however, it is critical to understand the where, when and how of cod spawning so that conservation measures are effective and do not cause unnecessary harm to a struggling fishery. A variety of research programs have been pursued the answers to these questions over the last decade and have relied heavily on acoustic telemetry and passive acoustic monitoring. Results from these projects will be summarized and presented in the context of the current state of the GOM cod stock.

9 April 2015

Title: Indigenous Knowledge and Use of Ocean Currents in the Bering Strait Region
Presenter(s): Julie Raymond-Yakoubian, Kawerak Social Science Program Director
Date & Time: 9 April 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Julie Raymond-Yakoubian, Kawerak Social Science Program Director Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3014373064856709889

Sponsor(s):
This presentation is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series which is co-sponsored with EBM Tools Network. The series is focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. For a list of upcoming webinars see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ Webinar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Julie Raymond-Yakoubian of Kawerak, Inc. will be discussing a recently completed project on indigenous knowledge and use of ocean currents. This webinar will share perspectives on the importance of traditional understandings of ocean currents as a critical aspect of the body of knowledge held by communities in the region, how this knowledge was collected, and the modern-day practical applications of this knowledge for marine policy, planning, and safety considerations. The session will include examples of where this knowledge is currently being used.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 April 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Exploring the dual nature of Pacific salmon straying as a biological phenomenon and conservation crisis
Presenter(s): Peter Westley, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date & Time: 9 April 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 9811
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Peter Westley, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska, Fairbanks

Sponsor(s):
Monster JAM Spring 2015 POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov WEBINAR Join Webex : Updated 04/09/2015 : https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m0278717ee1e5184e6927927b164e61a5 The new meeting number is: 808 936 258

Sponsor(s):
This presentation is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series which is co-sponsored with EBM Tools Network. The series is focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. For a list of upcoming webinars see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ Webinar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov ABSTRACT A fundamental aspect of Pacific salmon biology is their propensity to return home to spawn in natal locations after spending time at sea. Homing (or philopatry) has major implications for the ecology and evolution of populations as well as results in the necessity for complex management regulations. It has long been recognized, however, that not all individuals return home but rather ‘stray' (or disperse) to non-natal areas for reproduction. The biological phenomenon of straying represents a vital mechanism for the (re)colonization of habitats following disturbance and acts as the glue binding together local populations into metapopulations. In contemporary times, straying provides the mechanism for domesticated aquaculture produced fish to interact with wild fish on the spawning grounds and thus contributes to a mounting conservation crisis. In this talk I will discuss insights gleaned from recent analyses of tagged salmon in the Columbia River with coded-wire tags and PIT tags to explore the ‘natural' and anthropogenic factors that shape rates of dispersal. The results of these analyses led to the articulation of a potential role of social behavior during the homing process of adult salmon. In addition, I discuss new work beginning in Southeast Alaska to better understand factors influencing straying by hatchery-produced chum salmon and to explore some of the potential ecological costs to wild populations. BIO Peter received his BSc and MSc from the University of Washington's School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and his PhD from Memorial University of Newfoundland in Canada. Following his PhD, Peter returned back to Seattle to work with Thomas Quinn (UW) and Andrew Dittman (NWFSC) and quickly became absorbed in the general and applied aspects of salmon straying ecology. In the summer of 2014 he made the final leg of a long journey back to his home state of Alaska, where he joined the faculty of the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

14 April 2015

Title: Alaska River Break-up: Historic comparison and 2015 Spring Outlook - What can we expect?
Presenter(s): Crane Johnson & Rick Thoman, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 14 April 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: ACCAP, 930 Koyukuk Drive in room 407 in the Akasofu Building, UAF Campus, Fairbanks, AK)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Crane Johnson & Rick Thoman, National Weather Service Webinar Location: Online Access (https://accap.uaf.edu/River_Breakup) or in person at ACCAP (930 Koyukuk Drive in room 407 IARC/Akasofu on the University of Alaska Fairbanks Campus)

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinar; point of contact is Tina Buxbaum Seminar Remote Access and Notes:For further information and to register go to https://accap.uaf.edu/River_Breakup or contact Tina Buxbaum (907-474-7812 or tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

Abstract:
Each year the National Weather Service provides a breakup outlook for Alaska Rivers. This winter stands out as unusual with both temperature and precipitation anomalies observed throughout the state. We will present a brief overview of current conditions and provide our spring statewide flooding potential outlook. This will be followed by a comparison of historic breakup years and a spring/summer climate outlook.

16 April 2015

Title: Blame it on the wind - understanding mechanisms of NE Pacific temperature trends and variations since 1900, including the weird warm year of 2014
Presenter(s): Nate Mantua, Ph.D., Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 16 April 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Seattle Yacht Club 1807 East Hamlin Street (just west of the NWFSC)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Nate Mantua, Ph.D., Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center NOAA Fisheries

Sponsor(s):
Monster JAM Spring 2015 POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov Sorry, No WEBINAR available ABSTRACT Over the past century, northeast Pacific coastal sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and land-based surface air temperatures (SATs) display multidecadal variations associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, in addition to a warming trend of ~0.5 to 1°C. NE Pacific SST variability can largely be explained by a combination of regional atmospheric forcing and ocean persistence. Reduced northerly and increased southerly winds led to century-long warming around the NE Pacific margins, with the strongest trends observed from 1910 to 1940. NE Pacific wind trends are estimated to account for more than 80% of the 1900-2012 linear warming trend in coastal NE Pacific SST and US Pacific northwest (Washington, Oregon and northern California) SAT. Climate model simulations run under historical radiative forcings fail to reproduce the observed regional wind trends. These results suggest that natural, internally-generated changes in atmospheric circulation were the primary cause of coastal NE Pacific warming from 1900 to 2012, and demonstrate more generally that regional mechanisms of interannual and multidecadal temperature variability can also extend to century time scales. The same model developed for understanding century-long temperature trends applied to 2013-14 captures most of the exceptional warming now present in the NE Pacific, but a small number of distinct patterns of wind and ocean warming are also noteworthy. BIO Nate currently leads the Landscape Ecology Team at NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center in Santa Cruz, California. Nate was at the University of Washington in Seattle from 1995-2012, where he most recently co-directed the Climate Impacts Group and was an associate professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. His research interests include climate variability and predictability, climate impacts on natural resources, and the use of climate information in resource management. His lifelong interest in Pacific salmon and steelhead has had a major impact on his research and service activities, and has catalyzed many productive collaborations with ecologists. Nate has a B.Sc. in atmospheric sciences from UC Davis, and a PhD in atmospheric sciences from the University of Washington. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Scripps Institute for Oceanography in a project focused on seasonal climate forecasting. He received NOAA's Presidential Early Career Award for his work on the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and its impacts on Pacific salmon in 2000.

17 April 2015

Title: National Weather Service Alaska Climate Forecast Briefing - April
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, Environmental and Scientific Services Division, National Weather Service Alaska Region
Date & Time: 17 April 2015
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: ACCAP, 930 Koyukuk Drive in room 407 in the Akasofu Building, UAF Campus, Fairbanks, AK)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, Environmental and Scientific Services Division, National Weather Service Alaska Region Webinar Location: Online Access (http://accap.adobeconnect.com/nws_april_2015/event/event_info.html) Point of Contact: Tina Buxbaum Seminar Remote Access and Notes: For further information and to register go to http://accap.adobeconnect.com/nws_april_2015/event/event_info.html or contact Tina Buxbaum (907-474-7812 or tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

Abstract:
Do you lay awake at nights wondering what the upcoming season will be like? Want to place bets with friends and family on next month's weather? If so, good news: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. Rick Thoman (Climate Science and Services Manager, Environmental and Scientific Services Division, National Weather Service Alaska Region) will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review forecast tools and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the upcoming season. Rick will also present a "Model-of-the-Month" special feature in which each month he will explain one or two of the models that is used in the forecasts in greater detail. More information and past briefing recordings available here: https://accap.uaf.edu/NWS_Briefings. Due to new government regulations the briefing is moved to IARC/Akasofu 407 (previous in the NWS Conference room) on the UAF Campus or online.

20 April 2015

Title: Is Satellite Data about to get the Recognition it Deserves on TV Weather?
Presenter(s): Dan Satterfield, Chief Meteorologist, WBOC TV, Salisbury Md
Date & Time: 20 April 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building, 10210 Greenbelt Rd, Lanham MD 20706
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dan Satterfield, Chief Meteorologist, WBOC TV, Salisbury Md

Sponsor(s):
NESDIS Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Program. Point of Contact: bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Audio: 877-401-9225 passcode: 53339716 Webcast: 1. Go to https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.phpMTID=m1d9b78a2ca61ae1d53710e41a5b1514c 2. If requested, enter your name and email address. 3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: Jpss2015! 4. Click "Join".

Abstract:
Over the past 50 years we've seen a dramatic improvement in the quality of weather data that viewers see on TV every day and this is especially true of radar data. Many TV stations had weather radar by the early 70's and since then the advances have been steady, leading to Doppler radar and now dual polarimetric data being shown on air and now online. In some ways however, we've seen the quality of satellite imagery shown on air decline, with poorer resolution than was available in the late 70's, and we're only now starting to realize the ability to show viewers higher quality data. Times are changing though, and there are promising developments that should lead to a sea-change in the way satellite data is explained and delivered to the public, with GOES-R launching soon and improvements in the distribution of Polar orbiting data. There are still major hurdles to overcome, and the public's appreciation of satellite data will likely lag behind their appreciation of radar data for some time to come.

Bio(s):
In addition to being the Chief Meteorologist at WBOC TV in Salisbury MD, Dan Satterfield is the Chair of the National Weather Association's Committee on Remote Sensing and Chair of the American Meteorological Society's Committee on Station Science.

21 April 2015

Title: A Regional Modeling System for Weather and Climate Studies in South America
Presenter(s): Ana Nunes, Instituto de Geociências-IGEO, Brozil
Date & Time: 21 April 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP),Rm 2155
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Ana Nunes, Instituto de Geociências (IGEO), Centro de Ciências Matemáticas e da Natureza (CCMN), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Sponsor(s):
EMC Seminar, POC: Henry Juan, henry.juang@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/149978309 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (224) 501-3412 Access Code: 149-978-309

Abstract:
A version of the NCEP Regional Spectral Model, coupled to the NOAA Land-Surface Model, was successfully implemented at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil, as part of an integrated modeling system for the analysis of vulnerability and risk caused by severe weather or extreme climate events. Specifically for climate studies, this regional modeling system employs a new boundary forcing based on scale-selective bias correction and precipitation assimilation. Similar to the spectral nudging technique for dynamical downscaling, the scale-selective bias correction allows high-resolution modes to develop, but maintains the large-scale features from the boundary conditions, whereas the precipitation assimilation procedure acts on the modeled deep-convection and drives the land-surface scheme variables. In this newer version, the scale-selective bias correction was applied only on the rotational part of the wind field, letting the assimilation of satellite-based precipitation estimates to correct moisture convergence. Thus, the two techniques can be used together to improve the regional modeling system solutions, particularly in the tropics and subtropics where moisture convergence can be difficult to depict. Comparisons with the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis outputs will be shown at resolutions of approximately 38- and 25-km of the regional modeling system.
Title: Effects of Elevated CO2 on the Early Life-Stages of Marine Fishes and Potential Consequences of Ocean Acidification
Presenter(s): Dr. Chris Chambers, Fisheries Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries' Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sandy Hook, NJ
Date & Time: 21 April 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual Attendance Only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6431006493140246018
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Chris Chambers, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6431006493140246018

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and the acidification of Earth's oceans are due largely to absorption by seawater of excess, atmospheric CO2 from fossil-fuel combustion. Evidence available about CO2 effects on fish suggests that effects differ across species and perhaps populations, and may interact with other stressors. Further, these differences may also be associated with life-history strategies, habitat use, and parental exposure. Today's webinar summarizes experimental work from the NOAA Howard Laboratory on the effects of high CO2 on two species of flatfish from the NW Atlantic, winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, and summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, that differ in life history and habitat. Overall, winter flounder displayed increased fertilization success and embryonic survival with increasing CO2 and decreasing temperature. The responses of winter flounder varied with the source of adults (Mid-Atlantic Bight, MAB vs Gulf of Maine, GOM) with offspring of GOM origin more tolerant to elevated CO2 than those from the MAB, but less tolerant to warmer water. Summer flounder exhibited reduced fertilization and embryonic survival with elevated CO2 and colder temperature. Population and species differences in early life-stage responses to elevated CO2 may influence the adaptation potential and persistence of these species at predicted levels of near-future climate change.
Title: The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, An Ancient Crab, and An Epic Journey
Presenter(s): Deborah Cramer, Author, Visiting Scholar, MIT
Date & Time: 21 April 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Deborah Cramer, Author, Visiting Scholar, MIT.

Sponsor(s):
NOS Coral Reef Conservation Program and the NOS Science Seminar Series; points of contact are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov & Jenny.Waddell@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
For Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 . No passcode required for web.

Abstract:
Deborah Cramer, author of the new book The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey, accompanied the recently federally listed red knot along its extraordinary migration from remote windswept beaches in Tierra del Fuego up into their Arctic nesting grounds. She will share her firsthand experiences from this journey, and her examination of the challenges facing shorebirds and horseshoe crabs (whose eggs power a critical leg of the migration and whose blue blood safeguards human health) along an increasingly fragile and congested coast. The Narrow Edge is an inspiring portrait of loss and resilience, of the tenacity of shorebirds and horseshoe crabs, and the undaunted courage of the many people devoted to giving them safe harbor. Tom Lovejoy, University Professor of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, and National Geographic Conservation Fellow, writes that Cramer's account is “more thrilling than the Kentucky Derby.” Elizabeth Kolbert, author of The Sixth Extinction, writes that The Narrow Edge is at once an intimate portrait of the small red knot and a much larger exploration of our wondrous, imperiled world.”

Bio(s):
Deborah Cramer has written three books, "Great Waters: An Atlantic Passage"; "Smithsonian Ocean: Our Water Our World", the companion to the Ocean Hall at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History, and "The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab & and an Epic Journey", about the near-miraculous 19,000 mile annual odyssey of red knots along the length of the earth. She has lectured about her writing and the sea on both sides of the Atlantic, at science and maritime museums, at major environmental and teacher's organizations and at undergraduate and graduate schools in oceanography and journalism. Ms. Cramer is also on the Sanctuary Advisory Council of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, where she helped set up a northern “gateway” to the sanctuary in Gloucester. She has been working to link local birders to the Stellwagen Sanctuary Seabird Stewards program, where birders go out on whale watches and count seabirds in the sanctuary. She lives at the edge of a salt marsh in Gloucester, Massachusetts and is a visiting scholar at MIT.

22 April 2015

Title: Inland/Great Lakes: Regional Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Meetings/Webinar
Presenter(s): Caitlin Gould, Tim Davis, Linda Novitski, NOAA; Stacey DeGrasse, FDA; Lesley D'Anglada, EPA; and Rachel Melnick, USDA
Date & Time: 22 April 2015
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar only; remote access at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/03/30/2015-07247/interagency-working-group-on-the-harmful-algal-bloom-and-hypoxia-research-and-control-amendments-act
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Caitlin Gould, Tim Davis, and Linda Novitski, NOAA; Stacey DeGrasse, FDA; Lesley D'Anglada, EPA; and Rachel Melnick, USDA

Sponsor(s):
The Interagency Working Group on HABHRCA, POC: Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov Date/Time: 4/22/15 11:30-12:30 EDT Remote Access and more info on this national and regional webinar series: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/03/30/2015-07247/interagency-working-group-on-the-harmful-algal-bloom-and-hypoxia-research-and-control-amendments-act To participate in the online meeting, please register no later than 5 PM EDT on the evening before each presentation by sending an email to Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov. Each meeting is limited to 500 participants and is on a first-come, first-served basis. Please submit comments and questions in advance of and following each webinar, via e-mail to IWG-HABHRCA@noaa.gov or to Caitlin Gould at NOAA, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, SSMC-4, #8234, 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910.

Abstract:
The Interagency Working Group on HABHRCA is hosting a series of regional webinars - Southeast/Gulf of Mexico/Mid-Atlantic, Inland/Great Lakes, Northwest, and Northeast on harmful algal blooms (HABs) and hypoxia. A Federal Register Notice has been published (see link above) about these presentations; additionally, information is available on times and on how to participate. These webinars will initiate conversation between federal representatives and stakeholders on topics related to HABs and hypoxia, some of the most complex and economically damaging issues affecting our ability to protect the health of our nation's coastal and freshwater ecosystems. The goal of the series is to gain region-specific information on, and to discuss what stakeholders perceive to be, the needs for handling HAB and hypoxia events, as well as an action strategy for managing future situations. Remaining meetings include: Regional Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Webinar - Northwest - April 29, 2015, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM EDT (11:00 AM - 12:00 PM PDT), and Regional Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Webinar - Northeast- April 30, 2015, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM EDT.
Title: Harnessing Stakeholder Engagement to Produce Useful and Usable Science: a Qualitative Evaluation of Great Lakes Restoration Research Grants
Presenter(s): Rachel Jacobson, Program Planning and Integration Social Science Team, rachel.jacobson@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 22 April 2015
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, Silver Spring, Maryland
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rachel Jacobson, Program Planning and Integration Social Science Team, rachel.jacobson@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series/Knauss Fellows Lecture Series Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library or Wessley.Merten@noaa.gov, Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection

Remote Access:
Please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
The Water Center at the Graham Sustainability Institute is a grant-making organization affiliated with the University of Michigan focused on freshwater restoration and protection. Following implementation of its first funding competition for research, the Water Center sought to evaluate 1) to what extent its grant-making strategies and guidelines influenced the quantity and quality of stakeholder interaction with research teams; 2) to what extent this interaction resulted in increased use of the knowledge produced by stakeholders; and 3) how its grant-making guidelines shaped the development of the research and research teams. We conducted 30 qualitative interviews with PI's, project teams, and stakeholders, and undertook detailed documentary analysis of the RFP instrument, project reports, and other materials for ten grant projects. Coding and analysis revealed that previous PI experience, culture differences, timing, and availability and appropriation of time and resources were significant factors influencing the quantity and quality of stakeholder engagement. Results showed a need for better stakeholder mapping and resource allocation guidance during early phases of projects, and pointed to benefits of allowing flexibility in grant requirements based on project type.

Bio(s):
Rachel is a Knauss fellow in NOAA's Office of Program Planning and Integration. She supports the NOAA Chief Economist's team in catalyzing, empowering, and coordinating social science across the agency. Rachel's work centers around understanding and helping people adapt to the impacts of environmental and climate change. Prior to becoming a Knauss fellow, she was a Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute researcher, White House Council on Environmental Quality intern, Corporate Social Responsibility consultant, and Americorps volunteer. She received her B.A., M.P.P, and M.S. degrees from the University of Michigan, and holds a certificate in Environmental Law and Regulation from the University of Washington. Rachel is from Southeastern Michigan, and firmly believes that the Fresh Coast is the best coast.
Title: The Little Mussel That Could: Phosphorus Recycling by Dreissenids in Lake Michigan
Presenter(s): Caroline Mosley, NOAA OAR Communications, caroline.mosley@noaa.gov
Date & Time: 22 April 2015
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library SSMC3, 2nd Floor, Silver Spring, Maryland
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Caroline Mosley, NOAA OAR Communications, caroline.mosley@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series/Knauss Fellows Lecture Series Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library or Wessley.Merten@noaa.gov, Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection

Remote Access:


Remote Access:
Please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
The effects of dreissenid mussels on plankton abundance and nutrient cycling in shallow, productive water of the Great Lakes have been well-documented, but the effects of their more recent expansion into oligotrophic, offshore regions have received much less attention. Understanding quagga mussel impact on Lake Michigan's phosphorus (P) fluxes is critical in assessing long-term implications for nutrient cycling and energy flow. In this study, P excretion and egestion rates were determined for mussels in the hypolimnion of Lake Michigan. Constant low temperatures and limited food supply contributed to a lower basal P excretion rate in profunda quagga mussels compared to the shallow phenotype. The P excretion:egestion ratio was approximately 3:2, highlighting the need to consider both of these pathways when assessing the effect of these filer feeders on nutrient dynamics. Total dissolved P (TDP) excretion rates ranges from 0.0002 to 0.0124 µmol L-1, soluble reactive P (SRP) excretion rates ranged from 0.0003 to 0.0061 µmol L-1, and particulate P (PP) egestion rates (feces + pseudofeces) ranged from 0.0007 to 0.0269 µmol L-1. The ability of profunda mussels to alter P cycling dynamics is reflected in an increase in the hypolimnetic dissolved:particulate P ratio and the disappearance of the benthic nepheloid layer. On an areal basis, mussel P recycling rates are up to 11 times greater than P settling rates as determined by sediment traps, suggesting that mussel grazing has resulted in an increased delivery rate of P to the deep benthos and a shorter P residence time in the water column.

Bio(s):
Caroline is currently a Knauss Fellow at NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Communications Office. Growing up in Wisconsin, her hobbies included frog-catching in local ponds and chasing dragonflies. After a year abroad in Germany, Caroline received a B.S. in Environmental Science and B.A. in German at Creighton University in Omaha, NE. But she couldn't deny her love of freshwater ecology, and returned to Wisconsin to obtain her M.S. in Freshwater Systems and Technology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She graduated in December 2014 after writing her thesis on the impacts of dreissenid mussels in Lake Michigan. In her free time, she enjoys running, yoga, and posting pictures of her pet hedgehog Hans on Instagram.

24 April 2015

Title: Salmon, Water Management, and Drought in California's Central Valley
Presenter(s): Eric Danner, Research Ecologist, SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division
Date & Time: 24 April 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150, 1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Eric Danner, Research Ecologist, SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is David.Moe.Nelson@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add meeting no: 744925156 . No code needed for web.

Abstract:
Water and salmon in California are tightly linked. Throughout their life, salmon migrate through hundreds of kilometers of rivers and estuaries, and they do this twice: moving downstream to the ocean as juveniles and then back upstream as adults. In the Central Valley their freshwater and estuarine habitats have been highly impacted and altered by humans; in 2015 salmon are competing for water with 38 million Californians during a severe drought. We are developing tools to better understand how water management impacts salmon population dynamics.

Bio(s):
Eric Danner is a research ecologist at the Fisheries Ecology Division of the Southwest Fisheries Science Center. Eric is a member of the Landscape Ecology Team, and his work combines remote sensing, field methods, and models to better understand how physical processes affect the spatiotemporal dynamics of salmon populations.

29 April 2015

Title: Out of sight but not out of mind: Harmful effects of derelict traps in selected U.S. coastal waters
Presenter(s): Courtney Arthur, NOAA's Marine Debris Division, Peter Murphy, NOAA's Marine Debris Division, Ariana Sutton-Grier, University of Maryland, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, Holly Bamford, acting Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Management
Date & Time: 29 April 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, 2nd Floor
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Courtney Arthur, NOAA's Marine Debris Division, Peter Murphy, NOAA's Marine Debris Division, Ariana Sutton-Grier, University of Maryland, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, Holly Bamford, acting Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Management

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library

Remote Access:


Remote Access:
Please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
There is a paucity of data in the published literature on the ecological and economic impacts of derelict fishing traps (DFTs) in coastal ecosystems. We synthesized results from seven NOAA-funded trap fisheries studies around the United States and determined that DFT-caused losses to habitat and harvestable annual catch are pervasive, persistent, and largely preventable. Based on this synthesis, we identified key gaps to fill in order to better manage and prevent DFTs. We conclude with suggestions for developing a U.S. DFT management strategy including: (1) targeting studies to estimate mortality of fishery stocks, (2) assessing the economic impacts of DFTs on fisheries, (3) collaborating with the fishing industry to develop solutions to ghost fishing, and (4) examining the regional context and challenges resulting in DFTs to find effective policy solutions to manage, reduce, and prevent gear loss.
Title: A Concierge for Marine Spatial Planning
Presenter(s): Mr. Gregg Verutes, Science Education Lead, Natural Capital Project
Date & Time: 29 April 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mr. Gregg Verutes, Science Education Lead, Natural Capital Project

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; Coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conference meeting no: 744925156 . No passcode is needed for the web.

Abstract:
As 50 million people are born each year and similar numbers seek to raise their standard of living, the Earth's marine ecosystems face expanding pressures from fisheries, aquaculture, energy production, runoff from land, shipping, climate change and much more. Marine spatial planning (MSP) has been proposed as a way for more strategic and streamlined management of our oceans and coasts. The Natural Capital Project (naturalcapitalproject.org) is developing approaches and tools for marine planning that incorporate information about the suite of benefits people derive from nature (ecosystem services). In our experience, many of the same barriers to planning come up time and time again. We've designed a “concierge” to make it easier to learn about, get inspired by and implement MSP. The idea is to meet people where they are with clear, modular advice. If someone wants to learn about marine planning and how ecosystem services can help, they are eased in with some basic information. If an MSP practitioner prefers a deep-dive, they can skip directly to useful resources like helper tools for processing spatial data and synthesizing results. With help from the MSP community, we hope to iteratively improve this concierge and amass a library of interactive guidance to support a variety of decisions that lead to better outcomes for people and nature.

Bio(s):
Gregg Verutes leads the Natural Capital Project's training program which hosts online and in-person capacity-building workshops throughout the world. His current focus is developing innovative techniques that use maps, games, and problem-based exercises to teach others about valuing nature. He also serves as a GIS specialist for the NatCap marine team working on coastal zone management and resilience in the Caribbean and United States. Mr. Verutes received his M.S. from San Diego State University and his B.S. in Policy Analysis and Management from Cornell University.
Title: "Getting Started" Steps to Build Resilience
Presenter(s): James Fox, Director for UNC Asheville's NEMAC - National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center
Date & Time: 29 April 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: This Webinar is only available "Remotely" (please see registration information in the "Description" area below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
James (Jim) Fox, Director for UNC Asheville's NEMAC (National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
National Weather Service Climate Services Seminar Series/Climate Services Branch/Analyze, Forecast, and Support Office (AFSO) Seminar POC for questions: Judy.Koepsell@noaa.gov Where: Remote access only

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4495090872448803073

Abstract:
This presentation will focus on an introduction to the US Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT) for the White House and the National Climate Assessment. The CRT was launched as a Web site in late 2014. From the CRT, “The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT) provides scientific tools, information, and expertise to help people manage their climate-related risks and opportunities, and improve their resilience to extreme events. The site is designed to serve interested citizens, communities, businesses, resource managers, planners, and policy leaders at all levels of government. Strategically, the Toolkit is designed to help people take action to build their climate resilience. People who recognize they are vulnerable to climate variability and change can work to reduce their vulnerabilities, and find win-win opportunities that simultaneously boost local economies, create new jobs, and improve the health of ecosystems. This is a climate-smart approach"investing in activities that build resilience and capacity while reducing risk.” The “Steps” allow groups to focus on vulnerability and ways to take action, not just looking at exposure to climate change. About the speaker: James (Jim) Fox is the Director for UNC Asheville's NEMAC - National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center).
Title: Northwest Regional Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Webinar
Presenter(s): Caitlin Gould, NOAA; Stacey DeGrasse, FDA; Lesley D'Anglada, EPA; and Rachel Melnick, USDA and possibly others
Date & Time: 29 April 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only-remote access info at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/03/30/2015-07247/interagency-working-group-on-the-harmful-algal-bloom-and-hypoxia-research-and-control-amendments-act
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Caitlin Gould, NOAA; Stacey DeGrasse, FDA; Lesley D'Anglada, EPA; and Rachel Melnick, USDA and possibly others

Sponsor(s):
The Interagency Working Group on HABHRCA, POC: Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov Remote Access and more info on this national and regional webinar series: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/03/30/2015-07247/interagency-working-group-on-the-harmful-algal-bloom-and-hypoxia-research-and-control-amendments-act To participate in the online meeting, please register no later than 5PM EDT on the evening before each presentation by sending an email to Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov. Each meeting is limited to 500 participants and is on a first-come, first-served basis. Please submit comments and questions in advance of and following each webinar, via e-mail to IWG-HABHRCA@noaa.gov or to Caitlin Gould at NOAA, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, SSMC-4, #8234, 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910.

Abstract:
The Interagency Working Group on HABHRCA is hosting a series of regional webinars - Southeast/Gulf of Mexico/Mid-Atlantic, Inland/Great Lakes, Northwest, and Northeast on harmful algal blooms (HABs) and hypoxia. A Federal Register Notice has been published (see link above) about these presentations; additionally, information is available on times and on how to participate. These webinars will initiate conversation between federal representatives and stakeholders on topics related to HABs and hypoxia, some of the most complex and economically damaging issues affecting our ability to protect the health of our nation's coastal and freshwater ecosystems. The goal of the series is to gain region-specific information on, and to discuss what stakeholders perceive to be, the needs for handling HAB and hypoxia events, as well as an action strategy for managing future situations.

30 April 2015

Title: Northeast Regional Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Webinar
Presenter(s): Caitlin Gould, NOAA; Stacey DeGrasse, FDA; Lesley D'Anglada, EPA; and Rachel Melnick, USDA and possibly others
Date & Time: 30 April 2015
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar only; remote access only at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/03/30/2015-07247/interagency-working-group-on-the-harmful-algal-bloom-and-hypoxia-research-and-control-amendments-act
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Caitlin Gould, NOAA; Stacey DeGrasse, FDA; Lesley D'Anglada, EPA; and Rachel Melnick, USDA and possibly others.

Sponsor(s):
The Interagency Working Group on HABHRCA, POC: Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov Remote Access and more info on this national and regional webinar series at at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/03/30/2015-07247/interagency-working-group-on-the-harmful-algal-bloom-and-hypoxia-research-and-control-amendments-act To participate in the online meeting, please register no later than 5 PM EDT on the evening before each presentation by sending an email to Caitlin.Gould@noaa.gov. Each meeting is limited to 500 participants and is on a first-come, first-served basis. Please submit comments and questions in advance of and following each webinar, via e-mail to IWG-HABHRCA@noaa.gov or to Caitlin Gould at NOAA, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, SSMC-4, #8234, 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910.

Abstract:
The Interagency Working Group on HABHRCA is hosting a series of regional webinars - Southeast/Gulf of Mexico/Mid-Atlantic, Inland/Great Lakes, Northwest, and Northeast on harmful algal blooms (HABs) and hypoxia. A Federal Register Notice has been published (see link above) about these presentations; additionally, information is available on times and on how to participate. These webinars will initiate conversation between federal representatives and stakeholders on topics related to HABs and hypoxia, some of the most complex and economically damaging issues affecting our ability to protect the health of our nation's coastal and freshwater ecosystems. The goal of the series is to gain region-specific information on, and to discuss what stakeholders perceive to be, the needs for handling HAB and hypoxia events, as well as an action strategy for managing future situations.
Title: Pink salmon: genomic islands in the stream of evolution
Presenter(s): Lisa Seeb, Ph.D., Research Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 30 April 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lisa Seeb, Ph.D., Research Professor, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam, NWFSC; point of contact is Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=309684282&UID=1838089107&RT=MiM0 Meeting No: 802 868 564 Call-in toll no. (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 802 868 564 Global call-in numbers: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/globalcallin.php?serviceType=MC&ED=309684282&tollFree=0

Abstract:
Local adaptation is important for species diversification and resilience; yet, identifying the forces that establish and maintain local adaptation is challenging. Pink salmon, a highly-abundant and widely-ranging salmonid, is especially well suited for the study of local adaptation. The species has a strict two-year life-cycle and is composed of two temporally-isolated lineages with overlapping ranges that share the same spawning environment in alternate years. We identified signatures of contemporary parallel selection as well as SNPs likely reflecting divergent genetic backgrounds between lineages using genome scan approaches and a dense genetic linkage map derived from genotyping over 8,000 SNPs. We continue to use pink salmon as a model species for understanding the origins of adaptive variation across space and time.

Bio(s):
Lisa Seeb is a Research Professor at the University of Washington where, along with her husband, Jim, she directs the Ecological Genomics Laboratory in the School Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. Her current research efforts are directed towards identifying and characterizing adaptively important genes in natural populations and incorporating genomic information into the conservation and management of Pacific salmon. Prior to joining the University in 2007, she was a senior scientist in the Gene Conservation Laboratory at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (1991-2007) conducting research on the conservation and management of fish species important to commercial and sport fisheries. Lisa has an AB degree in Zoology from the University of California, Berkeley, MA in Zoology from the University of Montana, and a PhD in Fisheries from the University of Washington.

5 May 2015

Title: Climate Change Projections from High-resolution Global Models and the Implications for Fisheries Management in the U.S. Northeast Shelf Marine Ecosystem
Presenter(s): Vincent S. Saba, Ph.D. Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service
Date & Time: 5 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, 1315 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Speaker : Vincent S. Saba, Ph.D. Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library; Point of Contact: Valerie.Termini@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Over the past 20 years, ocean surface temperature in the United States Northeast Shelf (U.S. NES) has warmed at a substantially higher rate than the global average. To date, all climate change projections for species within the U.S. NES have been based on climate models that have a coarse ocean resolution (1 x1 degree global). These coarse models do not resolve the fine-scale bathymetry (i.e. Georges Bank, Northeast Channel) of the U.S. NES, nor do they resolve the correct position of the Northwestern wall of the Gulf Stream. Here we used high-resolution global climate models from the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory to assess differences in climate change projections for the U.S. NES as a function model resolution. We found that the high-resolution climate model (0.1 x 0.1 degree global ocean) resolves water mass circulation much more accurately than the standard coarse models. Climate change projections of sea surface temperature and bottom temperature within the U.S. NES based on the high-resolution model are up to 1.5 C (surface) to 3 C (bottom) warmer than the projections based on the coarse models. Therefore, existing projections for the U.S. NES are conservative and thus impacts to fisheries may be greater than the current climate change projections.

Bio(s):
Dr. Vincent Saba is a Research Fishery Biologist with the Northeast Fisheries Science Center's Ecosystem Assessment Program. He resides at the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) in Princeton, New Jersey. Dr. Saba received a B.S. and M.S in Environmental Science from Drexel University. He earned a Ph.D. in Marine Science from the College of William and Mary - Virginia Institute of Marine Science. His research focuses on climate impacts on marine ecosystems. His research scales the marine food web ranging from phytoplankton to top predators. Much of his current research involves the use of NOAA GFDL's high-resolution global climate models for their use in regional marine ecosystems such as the U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf. For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form at http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/brownbagseminars.html a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.
Title: Climate-Driven Changes in Interactions Among Hunters, Wildlife, and Habitat
Presenter(s): Todd Brinkman, Assistant Professor of Wildlife Ecology, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 5 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online or ACCAP (930 Koyukuk Drive, Rm.407 IARC/Akasofu, UAK, Fairbanks
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Todd Brinkman, Assistant Professor of Wildlife Ecology, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinar; point of contact is contact Tina Buxbaum (907-474-7812 or tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Remote Access:
To register go to https://accap.uaf.edu/hunters_wildlife_habitat or contact Tina Buxbaum (907-474-7812 or tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu)

Abstract:
Todd will present research that explores how climate-driven changes in the environment have influenced hunter-wildlife interactions across Alaska. Based on findings, He has concluded that recent environmental changes have challenged common hunting practices primarily by disrupting access to harvest areas. He suggests that a combination of innovative research, local adaptation, and flexible policies are required to address current and future challenges relating to hunter access to wildlife resources.

6 May 2015

Title: Scrambled, over-easy, or sunny-side up: Transport of eggs and larvae of reef organisms across the Pacific Plate
Presenter(s): Matt Kendall, Ph.D., NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCMA/Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 6 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Matt Kendall, Ph.D., NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCMA/Biogeography Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event" and add conf.meeting no: 744925156. No code for webcast.

Abstract:
Populations of many reef organisms are sustained through the transport of eggs and larvae in ocean currents. Understanding the geographic patterns of this larval connectivity is an important part of fisheries management, MPA placement, ESA recovery strategies, and promoting resilient reefs. These early life stages may be particularly vulnerable to climate change through ocean warming and altered currents. Management actions designed based on connectivity patterns today may not be best for connectivity patterns in the future. We use ocean drifters and transport simulation modeling to explore today's larval transport patterns, the influence of larval life-history, and potential effects of climate change on connectivity in the Marianas and NW Pacific Ocean.

Bio(s):
Matt Kendall has been with the NOAA/NOS/NCCOS/CCMA/ Biogeography Branch since 1998. He has a BS from U. South Carolina, an MS from NC State, and a PhD from U Maryland. He has completed the NOAA IT Security awareness training, Defensive travel briefing, and other required courses on the Commerce Learning Center Website. His research covers topics including benthic mapping, fish telemetry, MPA network design, landscape ecology, and larval transport in coral reef environments.
Title: Climate.gov tools and the climate dashboard / Vulnerability Assessment
Presenter(s): LuAnn Dahlman, NOAA Climate Program Office and Lisa Suatoni, Natural Resources Defense Council
Date & Time: 6 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
LuAnn Dahlman (NOAA Climate Program Office) will be speaking about Maps and Data tabs on climate.gov and about the Climate Dashboard. Lisa Suatoni (Natural Resources Defense Council) will be speaking to us about the Vulnerability and Adaptation of US shellfisheries to ocean acidification.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OA PI Meeting Webinar Series Point of Contact: erica.h.ombres@noaa.gov

Abstract:
This webinar series focuses on different data synthesis products or efforts and will serve as a lead in to NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program PI meeting held in June 2015. These webinars will help us have an informed discussion on data synthesis products that are needed and those that are already in existence that we might be able to add ocean acidification too. These webinars will be held every Wednesday at 2pm (EDT) from now until June 3rd.

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5806202414124609794 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. This webinar series is open to all those interested. As this is a webinar series, you will receive an email once a week allowing you to register for the webinar the following week. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

7 May 2015

Title: Transitioning Research to Applications Part I: Organizational Efforts
Presenter(s): Jin Huang, NOAA CPC CTB, Annarita Mariotti, NOAA CPO, Hendrik Tolman, NOAA EMC
Date & Time: 7 May 2015
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jin Huang (NOAA CPC CTB), Annarita Mariotti (NOAA CPO), Hendrik Tolman (NOAA EMC) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e0a0c6a02b8d6506dca44bd86d6e7739a Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: TBD

12 May 2015

Title: Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Review
Presenter(s): ESRL's Physical Sciences Division leadership and research scientists
Date & Time: 12 May 2015
9:00 am - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
ESRL's Physical Sciences Division (PSD) leadership and research scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and the Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Physical Sciences Div. (PSD). Point of Contact: bridget.seegers@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
GotoWebinar is being used. For webcast, go to http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/events/2015/review/ You will find required remote connection information and a review agenda.

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Physical Sciences Division (PSD) will be reviewed May 12-14, 2015 in Boulder, CO. The review will examine the following research areas:1) Observing the Physical System; 2) Understanding the Physical System; 3) Modeling the Physical System; and 4) Research to Applications, Operations and Services. OAR and PSD leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in the above research areas. Review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the PSD Laboratory Review website.
Title: Transitioning Research to Applications Part II: Research Delivering New Capabilities
Presenter(s): Sarah Lu, University at Albany, Mike Ek, NOAA EMC, Cecelia DeLuca, NOAA ESRL
Date & Time: 12 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Lu (University at Albany), Mike Ek (NOAA EMC), Cecelia DeLuca (NOAA ESRL) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=eecc800d36b8cc2f80276966b08e70d9a Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: TBD

13 May 2015

Title: Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Review
Presenter(s): ESRL's Physical Sciences Division leadership and research scientists
Date & Time: 13 May 2015
9:00 am - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
ESRL's Physical Sciences Division (PSD) leadership and research scientists

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research " Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and the Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Physical Sciences Division (PSD). Point of Contact: bridget.seegers@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
GotoWebinar is being used. For webcast, Go to http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/events/2015/review/ You will find all required remote connection information and a review agenda.

Abstract:
The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) periodically conducts laboratory science reviews to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted within each OAR laboratory and to provide strategic advice to the laboratory. As part of this process, the Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Physical Sciences Division (PSD) will be reviewed May 12-14, 2015 in Boulder, CO. The review will examine the following research areas: 1) Observing the Physical System; 2) Understanding the Physical System; 3) Modeling the Physical System; and 4) Research to Applications, Operations and Services.OAR and PSD leadership will provide overviews of the programs, followed by sessions of presentations from scientists in the above research areas.Review agenda and supporting materials are posted on the PSD Laboratory Review website.
Title: Atlantic Sturgeon in the York River, Virginia
Presenter(s): Jason Kahn, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Protected Resources
Date & Time: 13 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 Room 13409, 1315 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD; remote access is available
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jason Kahn, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Protected Resources Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries, Office of Protected Resources Seminar POC for questions: lisa.white@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Join WebEx meeting at https://noaa-meets.webex.com/mw0401lsp13/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=noaa-meets&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc0901lsp13%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnoaa-meets%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D228926527%26UID%3D1363846867%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAALLFFaeiKOanLB1UVM0mvwJRA_mQkjYs49eMnOhP8aC5AeyNI5Hgm44NX6poX0SQXFmheNj3xwrUEG1PqDt31uY0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmf0205d7acbd555be1716d9dc4d73d259 Meeting number: 997 899 499 Meeting password: noaa Join by phone at 1-866-815-7178, participant - 2263859

Abstract:
On February 6, 2012, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed five distinct population segments of Atlantic sturgeon as threatened and endangered under the Endangered Species Act relying on the discreteness and significance of the genotypes of 12 known spawning populations. The Chesapeake Bay DPS was identified as all rivers south of the Delaware River and north of Albemarle Sound, which in 2012, consisted of only one known spawning population " the James River. After the listing of the Chesapeake Bay DPS as endangered in 2012, an additional spawning population was confirmed in the York River system in 2013. Like other Atlantic sturgeon populations south of the Delaware River, this population spawns in the fall. Mark-recapture studies conducted of single year adult spawning population abundances in 2013 and 2014 suggest spawning populations of 75 (95% confidence interval of 17-168) and 151 (CI of 89-213). These calculated abundances represent the smallest known population on the Atlantic Coast. The effective population size, the number of individuals that contributed genetically to produce the sampled adults, is only estimated at 11 individuals (CI of 6-28). This is also the smallest effective population size along the Atlantic Coast. Physically, the York River is unique among large rivers on the East Coast, as it is the only one that originates below the Appalachian Mountains and is primarily spring fed. Because of this, the river is generally cooler and Atlantic sturgeon spawning runs are initiated earlier in the summer than in the nearby James River. Genetically, the York River population is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, meaning the allelic distribution suggests a unique breeding population, but when genes from this population are lumped with individuals from other nearby populations, they fall out of equilibrium. A STRUCTURE analysis suggests this population is distinct from any other known sturgeon populations. Homing fidelity to the Chesapeake Bay DPS is calculated at 6.9% (5 of 72 samples place to the James River), however when the York River is identified as a unique DPS, homing fidelity climbs to 91.25%. Because this population is listed under the Endangered Species Act as part of the Chesapeake Bay DPS, it is important for managers to know this population is very small and genetically unique from other rivers along the coast. About the speaker: Jason Kahn completed his undergraduate degrees at Millersville University in Pennsylvania in 1999 and his Master's degree at Michigan Technological University in 2002. He has worked for NMFS since 2003 as an anadromous fisheries biologist. He started out in the Northwest and Southwest Regions working on Pacific salmonids. When he arrived in Silver Spring in 2006, he transitioned to sturgeon. He began a PhD program at West Virginia University in 2009, with a research focus on Atlantic sturgeon. This will be the last year of his PhD field research.
Title: IEA-Integrated Ecosystem Assessments and Sanctuaries Condition Reports
Presenter(s): Becky Shuford, Isaac Kaplan, and Steve Gittings, NOAA
Date & Time: 13 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Becky Shuford and Isaac Kaplan (NOAA) - IEA (Integrated Ecosystem Assessments) and Steve Gittings (NOAA) - Sanctuaries Condition Reports

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OA PI Meeting Webinar Series POC: erica.h.ombres@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8434974187545812994 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. This webinar series is open to all those interested. As this is a webinar series, you will receive an email once a week allowing you to register for the webinar the following week. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

Abstract:
This webinar series focuses on different data synthesis products or efforts and will serve as a lead in to NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program PI meeting held in June 2015. These webinars will help us have an informed discussion on data synthesis products that are needed and those that are already in existence that we might be able to add ocean acidification to. These webinars will be held every Wednesday at 2pm (EDT) from now until June 3rd.

14 May 2015

Title: Eyes on the Coasts: NOAA CoastWatch Satellite Data for U.S. East Coast Environmental Decision-Making
Presenter(s): Ron Vogel, Satellite Oceanographer and Operations manager of the CoastWatch East Coast Node, NOAA/NESDIS, Satellite, Oceanography and Climatology Division
Date & Time: 14 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ron Vogel, Satellite Oceanographer and Operations Manager of the CoastWatch East Coast Node, NOAA/NESDIS, Satellite, Oceanography and Climatology Division

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688#. Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf. no: 744925156. No passcode needed for webcast.

Abstract:
Satellite data are currently being used to address a variety of environmental and coastal management issues along the U.S. East Coast. With broad spatial coverage and daily frequency of observations, oceanographic satellite data can detect patterns and monitor changes in physical and biological oceanic processes. This presentation will cover a selection of applications in which oceanographic satellite data are used to inform coastal and marine resource decisions, including oyster restoration in Chesapeake Bay, airborne bathymetric surveying, diver visibility, monitoring of offshore algal blooms, post-storm sediment plume tracking, and ecosystem forecast modeling.

Bio(s):
Ron Vogel is a satellite oceanographer and the operations manager of the CoastWatch East Coast Node, a regional satellite data distribution service within the NESDIS CoastWatch program. Ron's experience is in satellite remote sensing of ocean and land surfaces using infrared and visible imaging. He holds a master's degree in marine science with emphasis on coastal and estuarine processes from the University of South Carolina.
Title: IUCN Green List and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs)
Presenter(s): James Hardcastle, IUCN Programme Development Manage and Sue Wells, World Commission on Marine Protected Areas
Date & Time: 14 May 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - See event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
James Hardcastle, IUCN Programme Development Manager, and Sue Wells, World Commission on Marine Protected Areas Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4452467204356488962

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series which is co-sponsored with EBM Tools Network.The series is focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. For a list of upcoming webinars see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The IUCN Green List is a new and progressive initiative that encourages and celebrates the success of protected areas, both terrestrial and marine, that reach excellent standards of management. Protected areas that are well-managed fulfill their promise of conserving biodiversity and essential ecosystem services that benefit everyone and sustain life on earth. For protected area managers or agencies, the IUCN Green List will provide direct and indirect benefits from listing including: 1) International recognition for the listed areas and their management authorities for the high quality of management; 2) Political and financial support for areas that achieve listing, or to address issues that will facilitate listing of new areas; 3) Motivation of protected area managers and their agencies to meet and maintain high standards of management; 4) Opportunities for listed areas and their agencies to receive financial and project support; 5) Recognition by the tourism industry and visitors that the area will offer a quality visitor experience; 6) Acknowledgement by communities and stakeholders that the area addresses issues of involvement and benefit sharing; and 7) Further motivation to establish routine methods for measuring management effectiveness. This webinar will discuss the origins and implementation of the IUCN Green List including standards that protected areas must meet to be listed and how marine and coastal sites are engaging in the process.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 14 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Modeling marine metapopulation connectivity: understanding oceanographic and life history interactions across multiple spatial scales
Presenter(s): Dr. Julie B Kellner, Principal Investigator, Assistant Scientist, Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
Date & Time: 14 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Julie B Kellner, Principal Investigator, Assistant Scientist, Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam, NWFSC; point of contact is Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Join Webex Meeting Number: 802 868 564 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 802 868 564 Global call-in numbers: Global call-in number Need help joining? Contact Support

Abstract:
Assessing the degree of connectivity within and among reef sites in a metapopulation is central to understanding persistence of species that inhabit patchy ecosystems and is a fundamental requirement for the effective design of marine protected areas. Larval dispersal is determined by numerous oceanographic and biological processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, the probability of successful dispersal, both locally and regionally, may not be simply a function of distance from natal site. This relationship is examined by analyzing the degree of connectivity of the Orange clownfish Amphiprion percula at two spatial scales (around-island and bay-wide) in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea. Comparing the observed natal-to-settlement events to all possible anemone-to-anemone connections reveals that there is bias towards shorter dispersal distances at the local around-island (up to 1 km) scale in three different years despite potentially variable oceanographic conditions. Bay-wide (up to 100 km) connectivity is also a regular occurrence, with exchange of larvae across some of the more distant anemones. These observations of larval dispersal across coral reef habitats are compared to oceanographic transport estimates from a biophysical model that examines the interplay of ocean circulation and life history in a seemingly well-mixed coastal system using a coupled hydrodynamic and individual-based Lagrangian tracking model. Temporal and spatial variability of oceanographic transport can generate directional and episodic patterns of connectivity even in systems that appear oceanographically well mixed by eddies. Reef sites situated along the coastline may receive fewer potential settlers than more centrally located island sites. Sites near the edges of the bay where much bay outflow eventually traverses may also capture settlers from numerous regional sources. This general pattern can fluctuate considerably within the timescale of dispersal. Along with oceanographic transport processes, larval survival and settlement competency are also critical for the connectivity of organisms with a bipartite life cycle. Other life history characteristics such as pelagic larval duration, minimum competency age and larval settlement behavior also affect successful settlement. These interactions between ocean circulation and life history characteristics play a critical role in marine metapopulation dynamics.

15 May 2015

Title: NOAA Employee Briefing: California Drought Service Assessment
Presenter(s): VADM Michael Devany, Deputy Under Secretary for Operationsm, NOAA HQ and Kevin Werner, Lead Author, NOAA West Coast Regional Climate Services Director, NESDIS
Date & Time: 15 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
VADM Michael Devany, Deputy Under Secretary for Operations (NOAA HQ) and Kevin Werner, Lead Author, NOAA West Coast Regional Climate Services Director (NESDIS), and other report authors (see list below)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library

Remote Access:


Remote Access:
Please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
This week, NOAA released its California Drought Service Assessment--an internal, agency-wide performance review of NOAA's products, services and messages related to the ongoing drought crisis in California. Through interviews with more than 100 stakeholders and NOAA employees in the state, this report evaluates the timeliness and effectiveness of NOAA data, forecasts, and communications to communities, businesses and municipal governments--particularly in the agriculture, water resources and fisheries sectors. Recommendations outlined include improvements that can be implemented over the near term (six months) as well as longer range projects and research questions for scientific deliberation. Report URL: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/assessments/index.shtml [This is the first NOAA service assessment for a drought; all NOAA line offices are included in the report] Full Author List: Kevin Werner, Team Lead, NESDIS (West Coast Regional Climate Services Director) Chad McNutt, Co-lead, OAR (National Integrated Drought Information System Program) Roger Pierce, Co-lead, NWS (San Diego Weather Forecast Office) John Ewald, NOAA HQ (Communications & External Affairs) Karin Gleason, NESDIS (National Center for Environmental Information) Jawed Hameedi, NOS (National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science) Chris Smallcomb, NWS (Reno, NV Weather Forecast Office) Chris Stachelski, NWS (Las Vegas, NV Weather Forecast Office) Ryan Wulff, NMFS (West Coast Regional Office) Mike Anderson, California State Climatologist [CA Dept of Water Resources]

18 May 2015

Title: Climate and Land Services from the New Generation of NOAA Operational Polar Orbiting Satellites
Presenter(s): Felix Kogan, Physical Scientist, NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research
Date & Time: 18 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 8th Floor Conference Room 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham, MD 20706 and Via Webinar (See below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Felix Kogan, Physical Scientist, NOAA/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research

Sponsor(s):
JPSS/PGRR Seminar; Point of contact is Dr. Mitch.Goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Audio: 877-401-9225 passcode: 53339716 For web, go to https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m9380440e5005912761c85a92443feb4c If requested, enter your name and email address. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: Jpss2015! Click "Join".

Abstract:
In the recent two decades, the role of satellite observations for climate and land services increased considerably, especially with the introduction in 2011 of the new generation of NOAA operational satellites, called Suomi NPOSS Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP), which will continue as the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) for the next two decades. The Visible-Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), is accommodating the best technical and scientific features of its predecessors and has many new important features. S-NPP and JPSS, in addition to data collection, will address the impacts of climate and weather on industries, water, energy, population health, and other resources and activities. This presentation will discuss how these operational satellites improve early drought detection, monitor its features (intensity, duration, area etc) and predict agricultural losses; how fast Earth natural resources deteriorate; if the current warm climate intensifies droughts and increases its area and duration. These climate services have already become available to global community at http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/smcd/emb/vci/VH/index.php. We will also focus on space data continuity and development of several decades of data records.

19 May 2015

Title: Mapping and Visualizing Lake Level Changes for US Great Lakes
Presenter(s): Doug Marcy, Coastal Hazards Specialist and and Brandon Krumwiede, Great Lakes Geospatial Coordinator, both at NOAA's Office for Coastal Management,Science and Geospatial Division
Date & Time: 19 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Doug Marcy, Coastal Hazards Specialist and Brandon Krumwiede, Great Lakes Geospatial Coordinator, both at NOAA's Office for Coastal Management,Science and Geospatial Division Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Ohio State University Climate Change Seminar, Sponsored by NOAA thru Minnesota Sea Grant. Contact: Christina Dierkes (dierkes.10@osu.edu)

Remote Access:
To register, go to http://changingclimate.osu.edu/webinars/.

Abstract:
Planners and decision makers need an easy and clear way to show potential impacts of lake level changes in the Great Lakes. The focus of NOAA's Lake Level Viewer is to provide communities with lake level scenarios and assist with planning decisions, such as updating zoning restrictions, planning infrastructure, encouraging sustainability & restoring or conserving habitat.

Bio(s):
Doug Marcy has been with NOAA for 13 years working on flood, sea-level, and lake-level mapping projects, storm surge assessments, and coastal hazards assessment projects contributing to more disaster-resilient communities. Brandon Krumwiede has been working with NOAA for three years working on GIS and remote sensing projects focused on hydrology and the coastal environment.
Title: An Improved Multi-Scale Modeling Framework for WRF over Complex Terrain
Presenter(s): s):
David J. Wiersema, University of California, Berkeley
Date & Time: 19 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David J. Wiersema, University of California, Berkeley

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library

Remote Access:


Remote Access:
Please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
Atmospheric modelers continue to push towards higher resolution simulations of the planetary boundary layer. As horizontal resolution is refined, the resolved terrain slopes increase. Most atmospheric models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, use a terrain-following vertical coordinate that results in grid skewness over steep slopes, causing significant numerical errors and model failure. One solution to this problem is the use of an immersed boundary method. Our implementation of an immersed boundary method in WRF, known as WRF-IBM, was developed for use at the micro-scale, with horizontal grid resolutions between 1 and 100 meters. WRF-IBM has been shown to accurately simulate flow around complex topography, such as urban environments or mountainous terrain. The challenge now lies in connecting the micro-scale WRF-IBM simulations with meso-scale WRF simulations. This presentation focuses on the ongoing development of a modeling framework to enable multi-scale simulations using WRF and WRF-IBM. Results from 1-meter resolution WRF-IBM simulation over a neighborhood in San Francisco are shown to demonstrate the model's capabilities at the micro-scale. Results are also presented from our newly developed vertical grid nesting framework, which is a key component to pass information from a coarse-resolution WRF parent domain to a fine-resolution WRF-IBM child domain.

Bio(s):
David has Bachelors of Science from University of Michigan in civil and environmental engineering in 2010, A Masters degree in environmental engineering from UC Berkeley, and is currently working on his PhD at UC Berkely. David is collaborating with Katherine Lundquist and Jeff Mirocha, staff scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and works across the hall from the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC). (

Presente
Title: Eelgrass Meadows return to Frenchy's Cove, Anacapa Island: Recovery ten years after successful community-based restoration
Presenter(s): Jessie Altstatt, LiMPETS Program Coordinator, NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 19 May 2015
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA, SSMC3 Rm 5836, 1315 East West Hwy, SIlver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jessie Altstatt, LiMPETS Program Coordinator, NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s):
NOAA FIsheries; point of contact is Melanie.Gange@noaa.gov Note updated link:

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2176913542833154561 Webinar ID: 116-641-131

Abstract:
A large eelgrass (Zostera pacifica) meadow was present at Frenchy's Cove, Anacapa Island prior to the late 1980s. Extensive grazing by white sea urchins (Lytechinus anamesus) eliminated the meadow by 1991, when a 60 m transect (10 m depth) was established; no natural recovery was observed from 1991-2002. In 2002, under a NOAA Community-based Restoration Program Grant, eelgrass shoots were transplanted to Frenchy's Cove from two large meadows at Santa Cruz Island. Meadow dimensions, shoot density and reproductive status, along with density and species abundance of associated benthic invertebrates and fishes were surveyed annually along each transect. Densities of white urchins remained low, thereby facilitating expansion of the meadow via vegetative growth and seedling recruitment. Individual patches eventually coalesced into a meadow of 0.87 ha in 2009. Shoot density reached a mean of 108/m2 in 2009, and ranged from 23 to 90/m2 in 2012, comparable to natural meadows at Santa Cruz Island. Increased diversity and abundance of invertebrates and fishes were evident, along with a shift in fish guilds associated with the new meadow. As a result of the initial 2002 eelgrass transplantation, eelgrass meadows have returned to northern Anacapa Island, and by 2012, expanded along nearly 3 km of near-shore sandy habitat. A diverse biotic assemblage is becoming re-established at Frenchy's Cove and adjacent shallow sandy substrates along the north side of Middle Anacapa Island.

20 May 2015

Title: Visualize Your Data and Results
Presenter(s): James Hartman, Technical Director, Quantitative Methods Division, Office of the Inspector General, Department of Defense
Date & Time: 20 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
James Hartman, Technical Director, Quantitative Methods Division, Office of the Inspector General, Department of Defense

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, NOAA Central Library

Remote Access:
Please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.phpsigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For AUDIO in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. Do not use the computer for audio. You may need to download a piece of software if you have not used MyMeetings before, so give yourself plenty of time to log in.

Abstract:
"A picture is worth a thousand words" as the saying goes. Do your charts and graphs present your information as effectively as a picture? Is the information content readily understandable? Learn the fundamentals of effectively visualizing data and results to make more compelling visualizations. Immediately following the presentation there will be a one hour follow-on session to discuss your specific challenges and provide additional examples. Participants are invited to submit examples of their data and results (in advance) for discussions on improving presentation. Contact Monica.Montague or John.Bortniak for information on this follow-up session.
Title: Start of a 5-part Egyptian Red Sea Seminar Series - Part 1: Marine Conservation in the Egyptian Red Sea: Efforts and Lessons Learned
Presenter(s): Ayman Mabrouik, Ph.D., 2015 Sea Grant Fellow from Michigan State University, and Former Assistant Director for Nature Conservation at the Egyptian Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs
Date & Time: 20 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4, Rm 8150, 1305 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ayman Mabrouk, Ph.D., 2015 Sea Grant Fellow from Michigan State University, and Former Assistant Director for Nature Conservation at the Egyptian Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
The start of a five-part seminar series, Marine Conservation and Management in the Red Sea. After a brief introduction to this series, Dr. Mabrouk will present Part 1: Marine Conservation in the Egyptian Red Sea: Efforts and Lessons Learned.

Bio(s):
Ayman Mabrouk was born in Port Said, Egypt and graduated from the Suez Canal University in Ismailia Egypt in 1993 as a Marine Biologist. He worked for the national parks of Egypt from 1995 - 2009, as an environmental researcher, as a Manager of Nabq Protected Area, and as a Manager of the South Sinai Protectorates Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, Egypt. From 2009 to 2010 he was the Assistant Director for the Nature Conservation Sector in Cairo and mentor for the managers of marine protected areas of Egypt. He was responsible for developing and implementing the strategic management plan for conserving the Egyptian Red Sea, and he assessed the performance of the MPAs there (17,360 mile²) in terms of conserving marine resources. In 2014, Ayman got his Ph.D. in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University; his thesis was on “The role of marine protected areas in maintaining sustainable fisheries in the Egyptian Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea”. Currently he is a Sea Grant Knauss fellow at the NOAA NCCOS Biogeography Branch.
Title: Fisheries Ecosystem Report Card and Arctic Report Card
Presenter(s): Stephani Zador and Jim Overland, NOAA
Date & Time: 20 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stephani Zador (NOAA) - Fisheries Ecosystem Report Card and Jim Overland (NOAA) - Arctic Report Card

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OA PI Meeting Webinar Series POC: erica.h.ombres@noaa.gov

Abstract:
This webinar series focuses on different data synthesis products or efforts and will serve as a lead in to NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program PI meeting held in June 2015. These webinars will help us have an informed discussion on data synthesis products that are needed and those that are already in existence that we might be able to add ocean acidification to. These webinars will be held every Wednesday at 2pm (EDT) from now until June 3rd.

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2687036360300323074 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. This webinar series is open to all those interested. As this is a webinar series, you will receive an email once a week allowing you to register for the webinar the following week. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

21 May 2015

Title: The 2013-2014 Survey of the Washington Monument
Presenter(s): Dru Smith, Chief Geodesist, NOAA National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 21 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, secnd floor, East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dru Smith, PhD, Chief Geodesist, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library; Point of Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Access is thru MyMeetings, which uses phone for audio and internet for visuals. Please fill out the registration form http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. If this is the first time you have used MyMeetings, leave time to download a small piece of software.

Abstract:
After the 5.8 - magnitude earthquake of Virginia on August 23, 2011, scaffolding was built around the Washington Monument (WM) to facilitate repairs made to the building in 2013 and 2014. This provided a rare opportunity for NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) to perform a geodetic survey incorporating direct occupation of the WM peak with multiple instruments. The goal of this survey was to provide a baseline position of the peak so accurate that future surveys would be able to detect sinking, shrinking or tilting of the monument.This was only the third time in history (1934 and 1999 being the others) that NGS was able to use geodetic instruments at the peak. However it was the first time that a complete three-dimensional position, accurate to a millimeter, was achieved. As an interesting by-product of the survey, an architectural height of the monument, using modern international standards, was determined. This new height is in disagreement with the historic height by almost 10 inches, almost all of which is due to the location at the base of the monument from which the height was measured. However, by adopting the standards used in 1884, NGS was able to validate the historic height to within 3/4 of an inch. This talk will outline the history of surveys at the WM as well as the highlights of the most recent survey.

Bio(s):
Dr. Dru Smith has been the Chief Geodesist of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey since 2005. He first entered NGS in 1995 after receiving his Ph.D. in geodetic science from The Ohio State University. His original job with NGS was in geoid modeling. He has also been active in developing U.S. GPS policy and modeling the ionosphere using the CORS network. In 2008 he led the development of the GRAV-D plan, and in 2012 led the development of the NGS Ten Year Plan (2013-2023). In 2011 he was the principal investigator for the Geoid Slope Validation Survey of 2011, which proved that airborne data from GRAV-D yielded a 1 cm accurate geoid model. For his leadership of that study he was awarded the Department of Commerce's Gold Medal, their highest award. He is a member of the Institute of Navigation, the American Geophysical Union, the International Association of Geodesy and is a Fellow of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping (now the National Society of Professional Surveyors). He holds special appointments as a member of the Graduate Faculty of both Texas A&M University and the University of Rhode Island. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Conrad Blucher Institute for Surveying and Science and on the Advisory Board of the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering at The Ohio State University and has previously served on the Board of Directors for the American Association for Geodetic Surveying.
Title: Follow the fish: what fishery-independent time series are telling us about the California Current Ecosystem off California
Presenter(s): Tony Koslow, Ph.D. Research Oceanographer and Former Director CalCOFI Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California
Date & Time: 21 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tony Koslow, Ph.D. Research Oceanographer and Former Director CalCOFI Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam, NWFSC; point of contact is Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=309684282&UID=1838089107&RT=MiM0 Meeting Number: 802 868 564 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 802 868 564

Abstract:
Analysis of the CalCOFI ichthyoplankton time series reveals dramatic change in fish communities of the California Current (CC), including a 63% decline across a suite of 24 mesopelagic taxa responding to declining midwater oxygen concentrations and an ~70% decline in overall larval fish abundance since ca. 1970 in response to warming SSTs, declining transport of the CC and reduced zooplankton displacement volumes. These results are consistent with declines observed from power-plant cooling water intakes for fishes in the southern CC. However, these dramatic changes are not reflected in the commercial landings data from the region, highlighting the importance of fishery-independent time series. Acoustic surveys associated with CalCOFI indicate that mesopelagic fish biomass is almost an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on small-trawl sampling. Exploratory time series analyses indicate that advection and water-mass relationships rather than competitive and predator-prey interactions are the primary drivers of fish communities in the southern CC. These results have considerable implications for ecosystem models of the CC. Re-analysis of the CalCOFI data set indicates that even a much-reduced sampling program would enable these changes to be observed. These results have considerable implications for the development of zooplankton/ichthyoplankton observation programs based on single transects.

Bio(s):
Dr Tony Koslow received his PhD in Biological Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1980. Following a stint as Fisheries Oceanographer at Dalhousie University (Halifax, Canada), Koslow joined CSIRO in 1989 to work on the nascent orange roughy fishery and deepwater ecology. He transferred from Hobart to Perth in 2002 and then returned to Scripps in 2007 as Director of the Scripps CalCOFI program. His research at Scripps has focused on climate interactions with marine fish populations and communities in the California Current.

22 May 2015

Title: National Weather Service Alaska Climate Forecast Briefings - May 2015
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, Environmental and Scientific Services Division, National Weather Service Alaska Region
Date & Time: 22 May 2015
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: ACCAP, 930 Koyukuk Drive, Room 407, Akasofu Building, UAF Campus, Fairbanks, AK
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, Environmental and Scientific Services Division, NWS, Alaska Region Online Access: http://accap.adobeconnect.com/may_2015/event/event_info.html POC: Tina Buxbaum, 907-474-7812, tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Abstract:
Do you lay awake at nights wondering what the upcoming season will be like? Want to place bets with friends and family on next month's weather? If so, good news: The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. Rick Thoman (Climate Science and Services Manager, Environmental and Scientific Services Division, NWS, Alaska Region) will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review forecast tools and finish up with the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for the upcoming season. Rick will also present a "Feature-of-the-Month" special addition in which each month he will highlight a topic relevant to the particular month. May's feature will be the unusually warm sea surface temperatures (SST's) we have all been experiencing. More information and past briefings are available here: https://accap.uaf.edu/NWS_Briefings Due to new government regulations the briefing is moved to IARC/Akasofu 407 (previously in the NWS Conference room) on the UAF Campus or online.

26 May 2015

Title: Marine National Monuments and NOAA: Come find out what makes a Monument different than a Sanctuary, and learn about NOAA's Marine National Monument Program
Presenter(s): Samantha Brooke, Program Manager for NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Regional Office in Honolulu, Hawaii
Date & Time: 26 May 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC3, @nd floor, 1315 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Samantha Brooke, Program Manager for NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Regional Office in Honolulu, Hawaii

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series, point of contact is Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov

Remote Access:


Remote Access:
Access is thru MyMeetings, which uses phone for audio and internet for visuals. Please fill out the registration form http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=742656968&=brownbag&t=c a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. If this is the first time you have used MyMeetings, leave time to download a small piece of software.

Abstract:
There are a total of four marine national monuments in the United States, all located in the Pacific Ocean: Papahānaumokuākea (designated in 2006), Marianas Trench (designated in 2009), Rose Atoll (designated in 2009), and the Pacific Remote Islands (designated in 2009 and expanded in 2014). NOAA co-manages each of these extraordinary places, which are home to near-pristine coral reefs, large apex predator populations, rare and endangered species, and unique geological features. The Monuments also are intimately connected with the cultures and communities of Pacific peoples. As a co-manager, NOAA is charged with implementing the Presidential Proclamations through the development of management plans and research programs to preserve and protect them. An overview of the Monuments Program will be provided, along with a short introduction to each Monument and a summary of exciting developments.

Bio(s):
Samantha G. Brooke is the Program Manager for NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Regional Office in Honolulu, Hawaii. She has spent nearly a decade working for NOAA Fisheries programs, including the Northwest Regional Office, Protected Resources Division in Seattle, Washington and the Office of Science and Technologies National Observer Program in Silver Spring, Maryland.
Title: Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS: Technical Webinar by Esri
Presenter(s): Brett Rose, Solutions Engineer, Esri Federal Sciences
Date & Time: 26 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote access only - see login info below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brett Rose, Solutions Engineer, Esri Federal Sciences and

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's GIS Committee Point of Contacts: Adam.Bode@noaa.gov and Randy.Warren@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
http://esri.adobeconnect.com/noaa_webinar/ Audio: Phone 866-705-2554, Passcode 224636

Abstract:
Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS provides a foundation for building web applications in ArcGIS. Build intuitive, focused apps that run anywhere, on any device, without writing a single line of code. Build intuitive, focused apps that run anywhere, on any device, without writing a single line of code. Web AppBuilder allows you to: - Create HTML/JavaScript apps that run on desktops, tablets, and smartphones - Build the apps you need using ready-to-use widgets - Customize the look of your apps with configurable themes - Host your apps online or run them on your own server - Create custom app templates

Bio(s):
Brett Rose is the Lead Engineer for the Federal Science team. His primary interests have been enabling better decision making through the use of spatial data science. Brett has been as Esri for nine years and holds Ph.D. in Civil Engineering.

27 May 2015

Title: Bioeconomic model for Alaskan crab and The use of the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) for ocean acidification studies
Presenter(s): Mike Dalton and Rik Wanninkhof, NOAA
Date & Time: 27 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mike Dalton (NOAA) " Bioeconomic model for Alaskan crab and Rik Wanninkhof (NOAA) " The use of the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) for ocean acidification studies

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OA PI Meeting Webinar Series POC: erica.h.ombres@noaa.gov

Abstract:
This webinar series focuses on different data synthesis products or efforts and will serve as a lead in to NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program PI meeting held in June 2015. These webinars will help us have an informed discussion on data synthesis products that are needed and those that are already in existence that we might be able to add ocean acidification to. These webinars will be held every Wednesday at 2pm (EDT) from now until June 3rd.

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/477108148424071426 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. This webinar series is open to all those interested. As this is a webinar series, you will receive an email once a week allowing you to register for the webinar the following week. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.
Title: Using pteropods as a case study in water quality assessment
Presenter(s): Nina Bednarsek, Policy Specialist, Washington Ocean Acidification Center
Date & Time: 27 May 2015
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual attendance only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2597301917713997826
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Nina Bednarsek, Policy Specialist, Washington Ocean Acidification Center Space is limited.Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2597301917713997826

Sponsor(s):
California Current Acidification Network Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Pteropods are pelagic sea snails with aragonite shells. Numerous laboratory studies have shown that ocean acidification (OA) affects their vital biological functions in ways that can be quantified. Consequently, pteropods are a good candidate for use in water quality assessments pertaining to OA, for example those required under the U.S. Clean Water Act. The principal challenge in using pteropods for this purpose lies in connecting laboratory studies that show effects on individuals with population effects occurring in the natural environment. Nonetheless, several lines of evidence suggest that pteropods in natural settings are affected by exposure to OA, and that these effects encompass multiple levels of biological organization, ranging from physiological to individual, population, and community levels. These responses correspond to specific aragonite saturation states and are both quantifiable and repeatable, making pteropods a potential bioindicator of aragonite saturation state in the natural environment. Moreover, pteropods contribute up to 50-60% of the diet of fish species such as salmon, indicating their importance to the health of the broader biological community and adding to their potential use as an indicator in regulatory water quality assessment.

Bio(s):
Nina Bednarsek, Policy Specialist, Washington Ocean Acidification Center

28 May 2015

Title: The Tale of Two Bays: A comparison of the American horseshoe crab population in Wellfleet Bay, MA and Great Bay Estuary, NH and the lessons to be learned
Presenter(s): Helen Cheng NOAA OAR National Sea Grant Office
Date & Time: 28 May 2015
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Library SSMC3 Second Floor
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Helen Cheng NOAA OAR National Sea Grant Office Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR NSG Seminar POC for questions: wessley.merten@noaa.gov (301-427-8379)

Remote Access:
For remote access via webinar for each of these seminars, please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. You must use the PHONE to call in for audio. BE SURE to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Due to over-harvesting as bait, American horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) populations along the U.S. Atlantic Coast have been declining, particularly in New England. Additionally, population trends have not reserved despite state-by-state quotas and regulations. Current management and monitoring include closing the horseshoe crab harvest during the weeks of new and full moons of their spawning season and conducting shoreline surveys; these methods were originally based on horseshoe crab survey data from Delaware Bay populations indicating that peak spawning activity occurred during these times. Historically, Wellfleet Bay, Massachusetts has been a location where harvesting horseshoe crabs for bait is practiced, and despite current strict regulations and yearly monitoring, populations at this location continue to decline. While some states conduct monitoring and surveys annually, New Hampshire's Great Bay Estuary, supporting a modest population of horseshoe crabs, do not have an organized monitoring program, thus it is unclear when and where spawning occurs in this location. Recent studies investigating horseshoe crab spawning behavior, and new research and survey data from Wellfleet Bay, MA and Great Bay Estuary, NH indicate that peak spawning activity did not always occur during times of the new and full moons; instead, it is suggested that environmental factors may strongly influence horseshoe crab spawning activity. Generalization of scientific information could lead to ineffective decision-making in the management of a species, especially a species that is vulnerable during spawning and mating. Rather, behavior of local populations need to be investigated that then may contribute to the overall conservation of horseshoe crabs.
Title: The bloom that wasn't: Perfect demonstration of how nature does not follow a graduate student's timeline
Presenter(s): Emith Smith, NOAA's OAR National Sea Grant Office
Date & Time: 28 May 2015
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Library SSMC3 Second Floor
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Emily Smith NOAA Climate Observation Division, Climate Program Office Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR NSG Seminar POC for questions: wessley.merten@noaa.gov (301-427-8379)

Remote Access:
For remote access via webinar for each of these seminars, please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. You must use the PHONE to call in for audio. BE SURE to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Estuaries are biologically productive and important habitats for several fisheries. However, human intervention has separated many estuaries from their needed freshwater source and the common solution is to use diversions to regulate the flow. This episodic increase in nutrients into estuaries has sometimes led to the formation of freshwater cyanobacteria HABs (CyanoHABs). The goal of this research was to look at a field research study of phytoplankton bloom dynamics; management implications for cyanobacteria entering estuaries; and an outreach effort in relation to residents' knowledge about cyanobacteria and algae. The first study compared the phytoplankton bloom dynamics, specifically CyanoHABs, in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana (LA) during a diversion opening year and a non-opening year. While variations in freshwater flow were found to be important to determine which phytoplankton group dominates the system, species diversity within a group was likely regulated by the water source. During the large flow year (21.9 km3) in 2011, chlorophytes and diatoms were the dominant groups in the spring. In 2012, with a much lower flow of 0.3 km3, chlorophytes and diatoms were again dominant in the spring, but both years' cyanobacteria numbers significantly increased in the late summer. The second study surveyed fishermen about their knowledge of algae and HABs. This baseline data was used to create an educational brochure which was distributed to the marinas around Lake Pontchartrain and Lac Des Allemandes. There was also a follow-up survey to determine the effectiveness of the educational brochure. Many of the people surveyed had a basic understanding of algae, but 60% were not familiar with the term “harmful algal blooms.”
Title: Postponed: Web Metrics for Managers: Reading Behind the Numbers
Presenter(s): Lawrence Charters, National Ocean Service representative to the NOAA Web Committee, and NOS Internet Projects Manager
Date & Time: 28 May 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Conference Center - 1W611
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lawrence Charters, National Ocean Service representative to the NOAA Web Committee, and NOS Internet Projects Manager

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NOS Communications and Education Division and NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting use phone & internet. For audio dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667, enter code 7028688# . For webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf. no: 744925156 . No code needed for web login.

Abstract:
With the advent of websites and social media, government programs, for the first time, have the ability to interact with the public on a massive scale. But communicating the scope and breadth of that interaction is both art and science. Managers need to know how to ask the right questions, and communications and technical staff need to offer answers that are both illustrative and thoroughly marinated in the context of the mission. In this presentation, you will learn the basics behind some metrics used to explore the National Ocean Service website and social media, how to calculate these metrics for your own office website and social media accounts, and then how to weave these into a story for your office that you can use to strengthen your online communications. About the speakers: Lawrence Charters is the National Ocean Service representative to the NOAA Web Committee, and serves as the NOS Internet Projects Manager. He is a huge fan of numbers that paint pretty pictures.
Title: Genetic insights into the history of North Pacific Resident killer whales
Presenter(s): Michael Zanis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, College of Science and Engineering Seattle University
Date & Time: 28 May 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NWFSC 2725 Montlake Blvd. E. Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Michael Zanis, Ph.D. Assistant Professor College of Science and Engineering Seattle University POC: Diane.Tierney@noaa.gov 206-860-3380 Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=309684282&UID=1838089107&RT=MiM0 Meeting Number: 802 868 564 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 802 868 564 Global call-in numbers: Global call-in number
Title: Simple ocean acidification demos you can do (almost) anywhere with (almost) no budget
Presenter(s): Meg Chadsey, Ocean Acidification Specialist, Washington State Sea Grant
Date & Time: 28 May 2015
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online access only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Meg Chadsey, Ocean Acidification Specialist, Washington State Sea Grant

Sponsor(s):
Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources for Communicators and Educators Seminar Series. This series is jointly sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program.

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1599739207044647170

Abstract:
When speaking to general audiences about ocean acidification (OA), demonstrations, activities and metaphors can really help you get your take-home points across. In this webinar, Meg Chadsey, Washington Sea Grant's Ocean Acidification Specialist and liaison to NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, will lead us through her interactive ‘OA 101' presentation, pausing throughout to explain how the activities she uses illustrate key points about the chemistry, oceanography and biological impacts of ocean acidification. The best thing about Meg's activities is that they don't require a lab bench or fancy equipment, and you can source almost all of the materials from your own kitchen. After this webinar, you'll be ready to take your own OA show on the road!

Bio(s):
As Washington Sea Grant's Ocean Acidification Specialist and liaison to NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Meg supports scientists, stakeholders and the public in their efforts to understand, communicate, and address the problem. In the past year, she oversaw the production of two widely-disseminated OA fact sheets '20 Facts About Ocean Acidification' and ‘Ocean Acidification in the Pacific Northwest', contributed to a highly-ranked phytoremediation proposal submitted to the Paul Allen Family Foundation's ‘Ocean Challenge', and has trained educators in effective ways to teach about ocean acidification to a variety of grade bands. In 2012, she helped coordinate the Washington Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification, and edited the Panel's Science Summary. She has a bachelor's degree from Cornell University and a doctorate in microbiology from the University of Washington

29 May 2015

Title: Using GOES-R Probability of IFR Visibility and Ceiling for Decision Support at the FAA- Air Traffic Control System Command Center (ATCSCC)
Presenter(s): Michael Eckert, NWS/AWC/AOB
Date & Time: 29 May 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Remote access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Michael Eckert (NWS/AWC/AOB)

Sponsor(s):
GOES-R Seminar Series Point of contact janel.thomas@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Conference Line: 844-467-6272 Passcode: 106985# GoToWebinar Registration: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6687313649376675074 Webinar ID: 114-664-035

Abstract:
Low ceilings and visibility are two of many weather related aviation hazards that are more common during the Fall, Winter and Spring months. Surface observations (METARS) and Satellite Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD) (11µm - 3µm wavelengths) have been the main tools used in the past to anticipate the onset/dissipation of IFR conditions. The GOES-R Algorithm Working Group (AWG) developed a multi-tool approach using METARs, NWP, SSTs and other datasets to determine the probability of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) conditions. Operational use of the GOES-R Probabilities of IFR conditions has led to several well forecast high impact events, which has saved the Aviation Industry and Flying Public time and money. A review of these cases will be presented
Title: International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE): Highlights of 23rd Session
Presenter(s): Cyndy Chandler, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 29 May 2015
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Cyndy Chandler, Information Systems Specialist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry POC: Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov Webex: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c Audio / conference call: Toll free dial 877-725-4068; 8634769 followed by a "#". Please mute your phone during the presentation or toggle *6. Phone access limited to the first 50 callers.

Abstract:
The programme "International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange" (IODE) of the "Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission" (IOC) of UNESCO was established in 1961. Its purpose is to enhance marine research, exploitation and development, by facilitating the exchange of oceanographic data and information between participating Member States, and by meeting the needs of users for data and information products. The IODE system forms a worldwide service oriented network consisting of DNAs (Designated National Agencies), NODCs (National Oceanographic Data Centres), RNODCs (Responsible National Oceanographic Data Centres) and WDCs (World Data Centres " Oceanography). The 23rd Session of the IOC Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE-XXIII) was held in Bruges, Belgium between 16-20 March 2015. The Session was preceded by the Celebration Session and Scientific Conference on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the opening of the IOC Project Office for IODE in Oostende, Belgium. As the outgoing Co-Chair (Ms Sissy Iona and Mr Ariel Troisi) had completed two terms in Office, the IODE Committee elected two new Co-Chairs: Ms Cynthia Chandler (USA) and Prof Yutaka Michida (Japan).

Bio(s):
http://www.iode.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=438:iode-xxiii-candidatures-for-iode-co-chairs&catid=71:iode-xxiii Seminar presentation (NOAA Access only): https://drive.google.com/a/noaa.gov/folderview?id=0BxRB-4YPi2CUfklkLXBTdVZESm42V05OcnQ2dEdmY3BlLXdsSWpBVnRISjV2SEFvdVBEYmc&usp=sharing

1 June 2015

Title: Future of our coasts: Potential for natural and hybrid infrastructure to enhance ecosystem and community resilience
Presenter(s): Ariana E. Sutton-Grier, Kateryna Wowk, Holly Bamford, NOAA's National Ocean Service
Date & Time: 1 June 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC4/Rm 1W611, 1305 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ariana Sutton-Grier, Ecosystem Science Advisor, NOAA's National Ocean Service; Katya Wowk, Senior Social Scientist to NOAA's Chief Economist, NOAA's Office of Program, Planning and Integration; and Holly Bamford, Acting Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Management at NOAA.

Remote Access:
For audio dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For webcast go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event" and add conf no: 744925156. No code for webcast.

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
There is substantial evidence that natural infrastructure (i.e., healthy ecosystems) and combinations of natural and built infrastructure (“hybrid” approaches) enhance coastal resilience by providing important storm and coastal flooding protection, while also providing other benefits. Here we examine case studies where hybrid approaches are being implemented to improve coastal resilience as well as some of the policy challenges that can make implementation of these approaches more difficult. We highlight top priorities for research, investment in, and application of natural and hybrid approaches including the cost of natural and hybrid infrastructure projects, the value of the storm and erosion protection benefits provided, and the full suite of co-benefits provided by healthy coastal ecosystems.

Bio(s):
Dr. Holly Bamford is Acting Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Management at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. She works closely with Congress, other agency leaders, partner organizations, and local communities to develop policies and take conservation and community resiliency actions to ensure coastal and ocean stewardship and services. Dr. Ariana Sutton-Grier is an ecosystem ecologist with expertise in how nutrients and carbon cycle in ecosystems and how these cycles impact or are impacted by ecosystem restoration, water quality, biodiversity, and climate change. Dr. Katya Wowk is an expert in using multidisciplinary approaches to sustainably manage human impacts on the marine environment, with a focus on climate change and the ocean; resilience to coastal hazards and disasters; and marine resource management.

3 June 2015

Title: Shellfish Aquaculture: A Strategy for Eutrophication Mitigation in the Patuxent River
Presenter(s): Claire Quinn, Intern with Dr. Suzanne Bricker, NOAA/NCCOS National Estuarine Eutrophication Assessment
Date & Time: 3 June 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Shellfish Aquaculture: A Strategy for Eutrophication Mitigation in the Patuxent River

Presenter(s):
Claire Quinn, Intern with Dr. Suzanne Bricker, NOAA/NCCOS National Estuarine Eutrophication Assessment

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
For audio dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For webcast go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event" and add conf no: 744925156. No code for webcast.

Abstract:
The Patuxent River in the Chesapeake Bay is suffering from issues related to eutrophication. This project examined the feasibility of using shellfish aquaculture as a strategy for nitrogen removal. Results demonstrate the use of shellfish aquaculture could be a feasible strategy to removing nitrogen, especially when combined with preexisting land-based point source measures and non-point best management practices (BMP's).

Bio(s):
Claire Quinn is an intern with Dr. Suzanne Bricker of NOAA's NCCOS Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment. A native of the Baltimore area, Claire will graduate from the University of Maryland in May with a B.A. in Biological Sciences: Ecology and Evolution. She hopes to pursue a career in environmental education.
Title: Global aragonite saturation climatology and Seasonal forecasts and indicators of corrosivity
Presenter(s): Richard Feely and Sam Siedlecki, NOAA
Date & Time: 3 June 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dick Feely " Global aragonite saturation climatology and Sam Siedlecki - Seasonal forecasts and indicators of corrosivity

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OA PI Meeting Webinar Series POC: erica.h.ombres@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Dr. Richard Feely will be speaking about Global aragonite saturation climatology and Dr. Samantha Siedlecki will discuss Predicting Hypoxia and Ocean Acidification in the coastal waters of the CCS: What do we know and what can we expect? Sams abstract: High resolution hindcast models capable of simulating hypoxia and OA events exist and provide the foundation for forecasting efforts. One such forecast system (J-SCOPE) focuses on seasonal timescales for the ocean ecosystem on the WA and OR shelves. J-SCOPE is a product of the combination of a regional oxygen model and large-scale predictions from NOAA's Climate Forecast System (CFS). Results suggest J-SCOPE forecasts have skill on timescales of a few months. Despite these developments, the limits of the predictability of biogeochemical quantities are still the subject of debate. Through comparisons of model hindcasts and re-forecasts for 2009 and 2013 with local observations, predictive capabilities will be examined for SST, oxygen, and pH. Challenges in forecasting on seasonal and other timescales in the coastal environment will also be discussed. This webinar series focuses on different data synthesis products or efforts and will serve as a lead in to NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program PI meeting held in June 2015. These webinars will help us have an informed discussion on data synthesis products that are needed and those that are already in existence that we might be able to add ocean acidification to. These webinars will be held every Wednesday at 2pm (EDT) from now until June 3rd.

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2326927610506064898 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. This webinar series is open to all those interested. As this is a webinar series, you will receive an email once a week allowing you to register for the webinar the following week. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

4 June 2015

Title: The "Black Swan" Case: Spain's Battle To Reclaim the Treasure of the Frigate Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes
Presenter(s): James A. Goold, Covington and Burling LLP and Dr. James P. Delgado, NOAA
Date & Time: 4 June 2015
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: Commerce Research Library – Room 1894 (or online via Webex - see below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
Around the Dept. of Commerce Bureaus/Law of the Sea

Presenter(s):
James A. Goold, Covington and Burling LLP, lead counsel on admiralty matters at Covington and Burling LLP's Washington Office, and was lead attorney in the "Black Swan" case for Spain and Dr. James P. Delgado, Director of NOAA's Maritime Heritage Program in the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Dr. Delgado was the pro bono archaeologist for the "Black Swan" case while previously serving as the President of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology, a non-profit NGO.

Remote Access:
Register online. When registering, you will have the option to attend the Event in person or via Webex. Webex details will be sent to you the day before the event. http://doc.libcal.com/event/2088465. Point of contact: research@doc.gov

Abstract:
You are invited to join James A. Goold, lead attorney and James P. Delgado, maritime archaeologist, as they describe their work on the famous landmark legal case concerning more than half a million silver coins recovered from a deep water site off the coast of Portugal by a commercial salvage firm, Odyssey Marine Exploration. Odyssey characterized the find as recovering a large amount of silver that had been dumped at sea, while Spanish authorities suspected the coins came from the Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes, a Spanish naval frigate lost in combat with British naval forces during the Napoleonic Wars. In a protracted international legal battle, Spain's position prevailed, as Odyssey had indeed encountered more than coins, and that "smoking gun" evidence of the lost ship and its crew were present on the sea floor and in what had been recovered. The case revolved not only around the issue of the identity of the mystery shipwreck, but also the legal status of warships, questions of public and private treasure carried aboard the ship, and intervention in the case by the government of Peru, asserting the silver had come from colonial Spanish territory that is now Peru, and descendants of Spanish merchant families who had shipped coins on the lost vessel.
Title: Web Metrics for Managers: Reading Behind the Numbers
Presenter(s): Lawrence Charters, National Ocean Service representative to the NOAA Web Committee, and NOS Internet Projects Manager
Date & Time: 4 June 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA, SSMC4, Room 1W611, 1305 East West Hwy, Silver Sptring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lawrence Charters, National Ocean Service representative to the NOAA Web Committee, and NOS Internet Projects Manager

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's NOS Communications and Education Division and NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting use phone & internet. For audio dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667, enter code 7028688# . For webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf. no: 744925156 . No code needed for web login.

Abstract:
With the advent of websites and social media, government programs, for the first time, have the ability to interact with the public on a massive scale. But communicating the scope and breadth of that interaction is both art and science. Managers need to know how to ask the right questions, and communications and technical staff need to offer answers that are both illustrative and thoroughly marinated in the context of the mission. In this presentation, you will learn the basics behind some metrics used to explore the National Ocean Service website and social media, how to calculate these metrics for your own office website and social media accounts, and then how to weave these into a story for your office that you can use to strengthen your online communications. About the speaker: Lawrence Charters is the National Ocean Service representative to the NOAA Web Committee, and serves as the NOS Internet Projects Manager. He is a huge fan of numbers that paint pretty pictures.
Title: Managing for Resilience in California's Inland Fishes
Presenter(s): Stephanie Carlson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of California, Berkeley
Date & Time: 4 June 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stephanie Carlson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Dep't of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam; POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=309684282&UID=1838089107&RT=MiM0 Meeting Number: 802 868 564 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 802 868 564

Abstract:
Since joining the faculty in UC Berkeley's Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management in July 2008, I have been working to develop an active research program centered on the ecology and conservation of California's inland fishes. This has involved initiating several new field research projects in the Central Valley and coastal watersheds. A common theme emerging from this body of research is the importance of maintaining a diversity of aquatic habitats, even seasonally-available ones, as a strategy for conserving native fishes in Mediterranean-climate California.

Bio(s):
As an undergraduate at UC-Davis, I was inspired by Peter Moyle to study fish ecology. This led to a MS studying the ecology of stream-dwelling brook and brown trout with Ben Letcher at UMass Amherst. Following this experience, I joined Tom Quinn's lab at UW where I studied the evolutionary ecology of Pacific salmon with a focus on the evolutionary effects of bear predation on sockeye salmon. After a short postdoctoral position at UC-Santa Cruz with Marc Mangel, I started my current position at UC-Berkeley. My primary research interest has been and continues to be in understanding the dynamics of freshwater fish populations, particularly the factors that shape these populations and influence their persistence. While I typically study fish, I am interested in questions that transcend taxonomic divides. For example, my current research program seeks to understand the ecological context for variation in population dynamics and selection acting on natural populations.

8 June 2015

Title: Software Infrastructure for Future Numerical Weather Prediction
Presenter(s): Yannick Tremolet, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting
Date & Time: 8 June 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Center, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Yannick Tremolet, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF)

Sponsor(s):
Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) Point of Contact: erin.jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Video: 1. Go to JCSDA Seminar (https://star-nesdis-noaa.webex.com/) 2. Enter the event number: 993 192 535 3. Password is JCSDA 4. Click "Join Now". 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Passcode: 9457557 International: 1-517-345-5260 Slides available prior to, and audio recording after, the presentation at http://www.jcsda.noaa.gov/JCSDASeminars.php Abstracts:Over the years, operational data assimilation and forecasting systems are becoming more and more complex. Complexity arises from advances in data assimilation methodology, such as weak-constraint 4D-Var, ensemble data assimilation methods, and hybrids between those. Another source of added complexity is the development of more and more complex Earth system representations in the operational NWP systems, including land surface, waves, sea-ice, ocean and atmospheric composition. The supercomputers we use to run these forecasting systems are also becoming more and more difficult to use efficiently with many more cores than in the past and possibly heterogeneous architectures. Finally, in many cases, the systems are shared by several institutions, with more and more scientists and developers working in parallel, often adding to the complexity of maintaining the codes. To address this increasing complexity, a new software infrastructure, the object-oriented prediction system (OOPS) has been developed. It is developed and validated with simplified models, and several conventional and experimental data assimilation algorithms have been implemented. The components of the operational IFS are progressively being moved into the new structure. The design choices for the new software infrastructure will be presented.

9 June 2015

Title: Drought Understanding, Monitoring, and Prediction
Presenter(s): Martin Hoerling, NOAA ESRL, Amir AghaKouchak, University of California, Irvine, Tom Delworth, NOAA GFDL, John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas A&M University
Date & Time: 9 June 2015
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Martin Hoerling (NOAA ESRL), Amir AghaKouchak (University of California, Irvine), Tom Delworth (NOAA GFDL), John Nielsen-Gammon (Texas A&M University) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=298645200 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Marty Hoerling - Major boreal spring rainy seasons across the globe have failed in the recent decade. Droughts have increased over the Greater Horn of Africa, Southwest Asia, Southeast China, the Murray Darling Basin, the US Great Plains and the American Southwest. This study seeks to understand this global pattern of observed trends in March-May precipitation. Using a hierarchy of model simulations, both with historical forcings of the atmosphere since 1979 and idealizations of recent ocean conditions, it probes the factors responsible for the observed drying trends. We wish to learn whether the various drought trends are correlated with each other, and if so, to understand the physical factors operating. Has the global pattern of drying unfolded because there exist common sensitivities of each region's rainfall to a forcing? If some forcing has been responsible for the springtime drought trends across numerous continents, what are its origins? Better understanding this emergent situation is central to an improved awareness of whether and when these drought trends are likely to either accelerate or to reverse. Tom Delworth - Portions of western North America have experienced prolonged drought over the last decade. This drought has occurred at the same time as the global warming hiatus " a decadal period with little increase in global mean surface temperature. We use climate models and observational analyses to clarify the dual role of recent tropical Pacific changes in driving both the global warming hiatus and North American drought. When we insert observed tropical Pacific wind stress anomalies into coupled models, the simulations produce persistent negative sea surface temperature anomalies in the eastern tropical Pacific, a hiatus in global warming, and drought over North America driven by SST-induced atmospheric circulation anomalies. In our simulations the tropical wind anomalies account for 92% of the simulated North American drought during the recent decade, with 8% from anthropogenic radiative forcing changes. This suggests that anthropogenic radiative forcing is not the dominant driver of the current drought, unless the wind changes themselves are driven by anthropogenic radiative forcing. The anomalous tropical winds could also originate from coupled interactions in the tropical Pacific or from forcing outside the tropical Pacific. The model experiments suggest that if the tropical winds were to return to climatological conditions, then the recent tendency toward North American drought would diminish. Alternatively, if the tropical winds were to persist, then the impact on North American drought would continue; however, the impact of the enhanced Pacific easterlies on global temperature diminishes after a decade or two due to a surface reemergence of warmer water that was initially subducted into the ocean interior. John Nielsen-Gammon - This talk will present an overview of the 2010-2015 drought in Texas, as seen from version 1 of our high-resolution drought monitoring products. Such products, based on historical probabilities, are presently much more useful for identifying drought onset than drought termination. The recent shrinkage of drought area within Texas is directly related to improvements in reservoir levels, even though in many parts of the state the reservoirs are rarely full. Ongoing and future planned work involving the high-resolution drought monitoring products will be noted. Amir AghaKouchak - This presentation outlines a framework for improving seasonal precipitation prediction by combining the national multi-model ensemble (NMME) prediction with a baseline statistical prediction. The statistical model is based on an analog year concept and based on wet-season precipitation and three major indicators of climate variability over the southern US, namely Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI). The two different prediction methods are combined together using the concept of Expert Advice (EA) algorithm which has been successfully applied to the financial sector. The goal of this methodology is to derive an “ensemble response” that at every time step is equal or better (less error) than the best model relative to historical observations. The preliminary results show substantial improvements in seasonal precipitation predictability in the western United States.

10 June 2015

Title: Climate Change: Embedding Social Sciences into Climate Policy
Presenter(s): David Victor, Professor and Director, UC San Diego Laboratory on International Law and Regulation
Date & Time: 10 June 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA,1305 East West Hwy, Rm 8150, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David Victor, Ph.D., Professor and Director, UC San Diego Laboratory on International Law and Regulation, and Chairman of the Global Agenda Council on Governance for Sustainability at the World Economic Forum.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed.

Abstract:
Looking back over 25 years of work, it is increasingly clear that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) process should extend its scope to include insights from social and behavioral sciences.

Bio(s):
David Victor is an internationally recognized leader in research on energy and climate change policy as well as energy markets. His research focuses on regulated industries and how regulation affects the operation of major energy markets. Victor is a leading contributor to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a United Nations-sanctioned international body with 195 country members.
Title: Western Alaska Current Coastal Change Research
Presenter(s): Casey Brown, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 10 June 2015
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Online only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Casey Brown, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP

Remote Access:
http://uaf.us4.list-manage2.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=085039db9e&e=9097598e1a

Abstract:
Research on coastal change in Western Alaska has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future research. The work discussed here identified existing coastal change research in Western Alaska and synthesize each project's focus, approach, and findings. The resulting report documents the project landscape for communities facing change, decision-makers navigating change, researchers pursuing projects, as well as funding agencies trying to prioritize where to allocate resources. The goal of this effort is to help the Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative (WALCC) meet its mission of coordinating, developing, and disseminating applied science to inform conservation in the context of climate change. We created a Mapbox website showing the distribution of projects across the Western Alaska landscape. We used online information, existing databases, and discussions with project PI's to obtain the geographic location for each project including the latitude and longitude and the name of the geographic location (e.g. village name). If this information was unavailable, we tried to place projects in a general region (e.g. Bering Strait). Spatial points represent the locations of coastal change projects. Unique color markers were used to identify topic areas (human systems, biological systems, landscape/geophysical systems, and oceanographic systems).Unique colors represent human (purple), biological (green), landscape-geographic (orange), and oceanographic (blue) system projects.

11 June 2015

Title: Lessons Learned: Sustainable Coastal and Ocean Tourism
Presenter(s): Martha Honey, Executive Director, Center for Responsible Travel - CREST
Date & Time: 11 June 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Martha Honey, Executive Director of the Center for Responsible Travel, will present on lessons learned about Sustainable Coastal and Ocean Tourism. Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6674164588959491842

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center's monthly webinar series which is co-sponsored with EBM Tools Network. The series is focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. For a list of upcoming webinars see: http://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/resources/webinars/ Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Coastal resort and cruise tourism are the fastest growing sectors of the tourism industry, and uncontrolled, large scale tourism development is causing an array of environmental damage to beaches, coastal waters, and some MPAs. In addition, coastal & marine tourism is both a contributor to and victim of climate change. This presentation examines some of these problems, as well as efforts by industry innovators to construct and operate coastal and marine tourism in ways that minimize environmental impacts and mitigate and adapt to climate change.
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 June 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Emerging trends, trials and triumphs in the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment
Presenter(s): Chris Harvey, Ph.D., Fishery Biologist, Conservation Biology Division, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA
Date & Time: 11 June 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Chris Harvey, Ph.D., Fishery Biologist, Conservation Biology Division NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Sponsor(s):
Monster Seminar Jam; POC: diane.tierney@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?ED=309684282&UID=1838089107&RT=MiM0 Meeting Number: 802 868 564 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 802 868 564

Abstract:
This talk presents an update on recent activities of the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (CCIEA). The IEA approach was adopted by NOAA in 2006 to develop frameworks for synthesizing and analyzing information in support of ecosystem-based management of the nation's large marine ecosystems. The CCIEA, begun in 2010, is a collaboration largely between the Northwest and Southwest Fisheries Science Centers to support management of the California Current Ecosystem and its resources. The CCIEA team has dedicated tremendous effort to developing conceptual models and ecosystem indicators, conducting risk assessments, and exploring the effectiveness of management strategy alternatives; focal research topics have spanned from large-scale physical oceanography to food webs to human systems. The CCIEA is entering its fourth “phase”; the first three were dedicated to developing research tools, establishing relationships with key stakeholders, and increasing the scope and coverage of ecosystem components and habitats, but this new phase will be focused to a much greater extent on true integration of disciplines and products in support of three primary customers: the Pacific Fishery Management Council, the National Marine Sanctuaries along the West Coast, and the Western Regional Office. This focus on integration comes at a time when IEA budgets are stagnant and the CCIEA budget is sliding, and also at a time when the ecosystem itself is undergoing tremendous change related to environmental variability, past and present management activities, and larger-scale drivers. In this challenging research climate, I argue that the IEA will be far more successful in producing valuable, integrative products if the science centers embrace something of an attitude shift, where far more programs are engaged and the IEA is not looked at as a special project or source of funds, but rather a research pillar that connects projects and ultimately leads to better products that are more readily communicated to key management and stakeholder groups.

Bio(s):
Dr. Chris Harvey is a food web ecologist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, where he has worked since 2001. He is head of the Integrative Marine Ecology team in the Conservation Biology Division, and has been a co-Science Lead of the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment since 2014. Chris received a B.S. in Biology from Wake Forest University, an M.S. in Fisheries from the University of Washington, and a Ph.D. in Limnology and Marine Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

15 June 2015

Title: Development and Application of China Meteorological Administration's (CMA's) Global/Regional Assimilation and Prediction System (GRAPES) Model Systems
Presenter(s): Jiandong Gong, Deputy Director of NWP Center of CMA
Date & Time: 15 June 2015
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar POC: Yuejian Zhu ( yuejian.zhu@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Go to meeting - https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/261794661 You can also dial in using your phone. U.S. +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 261-794-661

Abstract:
The presentation will have an overview of CMA (China Meteorological Administration) developed GRAPES (Global/Regional Assimilation PrEdiction System) model and its application. It will mainly focus on research and development efforts undertaken by CMA in past years. The future development plan will be discussed as well. The GRAPES is CMA developed unified model system that started since 1999. The GRAPES utilizes a common dynamic core with different configurations of physics for different applications. It includes four main components: variational data assimilation system, unified dynamic core, physical parameterization schemes, and parallel computing. After nearly 15-year development, GRAPES model systems are the main components of CMA daily operational NWP system those include GRAPES Mesoscale system (Meso), GRAPES Rapid Analysis and Forecast System (RAFS), GRAPES TYphoon Model (TYM), GRAPES Regional Ensemble Prediction System (REPS), and GRAPES_3DVAR. GRAPES Global Forecast System (GFS) is on quasi-operational running. Currently, our research efforts are focusing on 1). Higher resolution (0.25 degree 60 vertical model levels) GFS model; 2). Global four dimensional variational data assimilation system (4DVAR); 3). Global singular vector ensemble prediction system (SV); 4). Global yin-yang grid GFS model (GRAPES YY), and 5) Hybrid data assimilation development. In the near future, CMA NWP operational system will be upgraded by all GRAPES based system.

16 June 2015

Title: Assessing Green Infrastructure Costs & Benefits in Toledo, Ohio and Duluth, MN
Presenter(s): Jill Jentes Banicki, Ohio Sea Grant, Lori Cary-Kothera, Science and Geospatial Operation Manager, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management, and Tashya Allen, Hazard Specialist, NOAA's Office of Coastal Management
Date & Time: 16 June 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Online webinar only - remote access login in below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jill Jentes Banicki, Ohio Sea Grant, Lori Cary-Kothera, Science and Geospatial Operation Manager, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management, and Tashya Allen, Hazard Specialist, NOAA's Office of Coastal Management

Sponsor(s):
OSU Climate Change Webinar, Sponsored by a NOAA Coastal Storms Program Grant through Minnesota Sea Grant. Contact is Christina Dierkes (dierkes.10@osu.edu).

Remote Access:
The webinar is free. To register go to http://changingclimate.osu.edu/webinars/ Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.

Abstract:
The negative economic effects of flooding from extreme precipitation events - including preparation costs and the expenses related to damages, clean up, and business disruptions - are being experienced throughout the Great Lakes region. This webinar will provide information about: - two pilot projects that explored the economic benefits of green infrastructure to reduce flooding - results from the study and next steps the cities are taking - resources to help your communities explore these topics. Visit changingclimate.osu.edu to view previous webinars and other climate resources.
Title: The Tropical Pacific Observing System 2020 Project in NOAA
Presenter(s): William S. Kessler NOAA / Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Date & Time: 16 June 2015
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar; POC: Avichal Mehra avichal.mehra@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/599995453 Dial In: 866-685-5896 8108134#

Abstract:
Spurred by the crisis of TAO in 2012-14, NOAA and partners are rethinking the Tropical Pacific Observing System through an international project, TPOS 2020, that will take advantage of new technology and reflect current scientific issues. ENSO remains a key driver for the TPOS, but subseasonal phenomena are also important. We will live with a redesign for decades, so are framing requirements carefully. Our first customers are the operational centers, and we consider the role of in situ sampling in the entire system: Observations => Analyses => Forecasts. Recognizing that current generation assimilation/forecast systems do not make effective-enough use of observations, we will target sampling where these systems need guidance for initialization, validation, and model improvement. Shaping these targets is a principal reason for this discussion, and a set of questions below gives some of the issues where EMC/CPC could help us set direction. A brief talk will describe the organization and process of the TPOS 2020 project, followed by discussion of the issues raised below. 1) We've heard from CPC and other centers that TAO buoy humidity sampling and ability to estimate evaporation and latent heat fluxes from the buoys is valuable, especially for subseasonal forecasts and analyses. How is this information used? How does it complement satellite moisture soundings? 2) What other surface met sampling would be useful? (e.g. BP, SW/LW radiation, precip). 3) Another set of questions concerns the geographical shape of the sampling. Is the present TAO grid appropriate? Any changes to suggest? (examples might be to contract TAO to denser spacing near the equator, or on the other hand to extend a few lines across the ITCZ or SPCZ). Would a few highly-instrumented sites (e.g. for direct surface flux measurements) be useful? Where should those be? How would they be used? (for realtime assimilation or delayed-mode validation?) 4) What about the near-surface ocean? We now have the capability to make profiles of T,S,velocity at much higher resolution than present TAO for the upper 50m, thus to resolve the diurnal warm layer, its formation and nighttime dissipation. Is this a valuable target? 5) TAO now makes delayed-mode velocity profiles at 4 sites along the equator. CPC said those were important as independent validation. Agree? If we measured velocity at more sites, would that be useful? For example, we are considering adding velocity sampling for two additional targets: the ocean mixed layer everywhere (could be realtime), and delayed-mode full-depth profiles at near-equatorial sites which would describe the meridional structure of the EUC and velocity gradients. 6) How do you see the combination of TAO and Argo being used? One strawman idea would refocus TAO: (a) towards the near-surface (where Argo is less useful because its sampling is so slow), and (b) away from the thermocline and subthermocline (where Argo gives salinity and better vertical resolution)? Would a rearrangement like this make sense for your work? 7) Since whatever system we design will be in place for decades, we need to think ahead to what future models/forecasts will need. Looking back from 2030, what will we wish we had started measuring in 2016? What observations would guide model improvement?

17 June 2015

Title: National Coastal Mapping Summit
Presenter(s): Ashley Chappell and Sasha Pryborowski, NOAA
Date & Time: 17 June 2015
11:30 am - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Corvalis State University Conference Center. Remote access also available - see below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ashley.Chappell@noaa.gov and Sasha.Pryborowski@noaa.gov Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Interagency Working Group on Ocean and Coastal Mapping Points of Contact: Ashley.Chappell@noaa.gov and Sasha.Pryborowski@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Webex and a conference call line will be available. To RSVP for the Summit please contact Sasha.Pryborowski@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The goal of this Summit is to increase opportunities for collaboration on ocean and coastal mapping, and to reduce redundancies and overlap. Coordination is fundamental to the work of the IWG-OCM, which is tasked with more effectively leveraging existing, limited coastal and ocean mapping resources for the widest possible use. Discussion topics include long-term mapping data requirements and near-term acquisition plans across the participating organizations and participating entities. We are seeking broad participation from IWG-OCM agencies, other federal agencies, and any states, regional/local authorities, academia, the private sector, non-governmental groups, etc. interested in sharing data needs and partnering on coastal mapping data acquisitions. Types of data to be discussed could include lidar, bathymetry, backscatter, imagery, etc. These requirements and plans will be displayed at the U.S. Federal Mapping Coordination site ahead of the Summit to aid collaboration. If interested in contributing plans to the site ahead of the meeting please contact Ashley.Chappell@noaa.gov for more information on exactly what is needed in order to share your areas.
Title: Integrated Coastal Zone Management between Theory and Application: Nabq and Dahab Case Studies, Gulf of Aqaba-Red Sea
Presenter(s): Ayman Mabrouik, Ph.D., 2015 Sea Grant Fellow from Michigan State University, and Former Assistant Director for Nature Conservation at the Egyptian Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs
Date & Time: 17 June 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4, Rm 8150, 1305 east West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Part Two of a Five-Part Series on Marine Conservation and Management Red Sea: Integrated Coastal Zone Management between Theory and Application: Nabq and Dahab Case Studies, Gulf of Aqaba-Red Sea

Presenter(s):
Ayman Mabrouk, Ph.D., 2015 Sea Grant Fellow from Michigan State University, and Former Assistant Director for Nature Conservation at the Egyptian Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Bio(s):
Ayman Mabrouk was born in Port Said, Egypt and graduated from the Suez Canal University in Ismailia Egypt in 1993 as a Marine Biologist. From 1995-2009, Ayman worked for the National Parks of Egypt, first as an environmental researcher and Manager of Nabq Protected Area, and then as a Manager of the South Sinai Protectorates, Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, Egypt. From 2009-2010 he was Assistant Director for the Nature Conservation Sector in Cairo, and mentor for the managers of marine protected areas of Egypt. Ayman was responsible for developing and implementing the strategic management plan for conserving the Egyptian Red Sea, and he assessed the performance of the MPAs there (178,360 mile²) in terms of conserving marine resources. In 2014 Ayman earned his Ph.D. in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University; his thesis was on “The role of marine protected areas in maintaining sustainable fisheries in the Egyptian Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea”. Currently Ayman is a Sea Grant Knauss fellow at the NOAA NCCOS Biogeography Branch.

Abstract:
Part 2: TBD

18 June 2015

Title: Tour du Potomac: A chapter of my dissertation that evaluated the potential resiliency of Vallisneria americana using individual-based networks of genetic relatedness
Presenter(s): Brittany Marsden OAR Formulation and Congressional Analysis
Date & Time: 18 June 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brittany Marsden NOAA OAR Formulation and Congressional Analysis Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR NSG Seminar POC for questions: caroline.mosley@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
For remote access via webinar for each of these seminars, please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. You must use the PHONE to call in for audio. BE SURE to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Large-scale losses due to nutrient and sediment loading, competition with non-native species, and limited habitat connectivity create concern for the long-term persistence of submersed aquatic vegetation and the essential ecosystem services they provide. Extensive, connected habitats are more resilient due to higher probabilities of supporting large, genetically diverse populations that can tolerate, acclimate, or adapt to environmental changes. The aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria americana (wild celery) is broadly distributed across North America's Atlantic coast, but has undergone dramatic declines in abundance and is the target of many restoration initiatives. Moreover, because the species reproduces both sexually and clonally, even occupied habitat may not support extensive levels of genetic diversity. To appropriately manage for resilience in the face of climate change, additional knowledge on the capacity of remaining populations to either adapt through natural selection or acclimate to emerging environmental conditions is urgently needed. I genotyped 828 samples collected from 33 sites located along the species' entire distribution in the Potomac River, MD using 10 microsatellite markers. I identified 413 clones and genotypic diversity within sites varied greatly, ranging from 0.0-1.0. The largest clone was found in 22 of the non-tidal sites and spanned 239 river km. Genetic relatedness among all clones was used in individual-based network analysis to quantify connectivity and identify potential breaks in geneflow. Breaks across tidal vs. non-tidal waters were observed and might be associated with changes in dispersal regime or differences in selective environmental forces. For my dissertation (data not presented today), this analysis was repeated across two additional rivers spanning a broad latitudinal gradient and V. americana collected from each river was used in common garden growth chamber experiments to evaluate evidence of local adaptation or acclimation. Overall, I found limited evidence of local adaptation and high potential for acclimation to different environmental conditions when temperatures did not exceed thermal tolerances, suggesting that V. americana has some potential for resilience in the face of change. However, some sites and regions lack the genetic diversity needed for long term evolutionary potential and regional differences in the distribution of genetic diversity mean that data from one river cannot be used to inform restoration and management decisions in other rivers.

23 June 2015

Title: Changing extreme streamflow patterns in boreal forest watersheds of Alaska
Presenter(s): Katrina E. Bennett, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Date & Time: 23 June 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Katrina E. Bennett, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Sponsor(s):
ACCAP Climate Webinar POC: Tina Buxbaum, 907-474-7812, tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu

Abstract:
The Interior discontinuous permafrost zone of the boreal subarctic represents one of the largest ecosystems on earth and is vastly understudied with respect to changing hydrologic extreme events. The first part of this presentation will focus on recent research results for snowmelt and glacially dominated Interior Alaska river basins for the past 50/60 years (1954/64-2013). The second part of this presentation will present projections of future extreme streamflow changes in a snowmelt dominated basin of the Tanana River, a sub-watershed to the Yukon River system, using six global climate models, two emission scenarios, two hydrologic models and two different time periods. Projections for temperature, precipitation and streamflow will be discussed, with a focus on changing peak flows events, and return intervals.

Remote Access:
https://accap.uaf.edu/?q=webinars

29 June 2015

Title: Why the OCONUS is ready for the new generation of environmental satellite
Presenter(s): Jordan Gerth, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Date & Time: 29 June 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 8th Floor Conference Room 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham, MD 20706 and Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jordan Gerth, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

Sponsor(s):
Joint JPSS/GOES-R Science Seminar Point of contact: Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
877-401-9225 pc: 53339716

Remote Access:
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.phpMTID=m7b62e2156e55624789696d21117a6f2c If needed, enter your name & email address. If a password is required, enter password: Jpss2015! Click "Join".

Abstract:
With Himawari-8 transitioning to the operational Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) geostationary satellite by the end of this year, activities are underway to prepare meteorologists at field offices in the National Weather Service Pacific Region (NWSPR) for the improved spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of the imager, ahead of the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R). But this is not the only activity that has been underway to increase the use of NOAA's satellite constellation to their operations in the Pacific Basin. NWSPR, with support from the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program, has invested in new L/X-band antennas in Hawaii and Guam to complement the existing antenna that was installed on the Honolulu Community College (HCC) in 2012. Imagery and products from the antenna are already making an impact to operations at the forecast office and Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) in Honolulu. More products will be made available to support tropical cyclone forecast operations in the near future. The "big data" era in weather satellites is upon us. How can forecasters parse all of the additional data to find critical pieces of information without exhausting their time? And can our technical systems, such as the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS), handle the two orders of magnitude increase in data? This presentation will provide an update of the training activities that are planned for NWSPR, how new and experimental products are integrated into operations, and other thoughts on satellite proving ground activities from the perspective of a part-liaison, part-developer, and part-scientist that serves NWSPR

30 June 2015

Title: The NECAN story - Linking Ocean and Coastal Acidification science to managers, policymakers, and coastal communities in the northeast United States and Canadian Maritimes
Presenter(s): Dr. Ru Morrision, Director, Northeast Regional Association for Coastal and Ocean Observing
Date & Time: 30 June 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual Attendance Only - click for details & registration link
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ru Morrison, Northeast Regional Association of Coastal and Ocean Observing Systems

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/371290050959625474

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Public awareness and concern about Ocean Acidification (OA) is growing at the same time as the science is still maturing. In addition to the trend in global OA, near-coastal areas experience Coastal Acidification that is highly dependent on factors such as freshwater and nutrient delivery which are beyond the general increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide, but may be influenced by other human use and climate trends. Addressing these interacting stresses, their influences on Ocean and Coastal Acidification (OCA), and impacts to coastal resources is complex and challenging, both due to the relative paucity of OCA studies and communication gaps between scientists and stakeholders. The Northeast Coastal Acidification Network (NECAN) is a cross border collaboration of scientists, agency representatives, industry and non-governmental organizations that seeks to provide relevant information about OCA to stakeholders in the Canadian Maritimes, Gulf of Maine and Long Island Sound. Efforts to date include a webinar series, state-of-the-science meeting and publications, web-based translation materials and face-to-face interactive stakeholder engagement workshops. The ultimate goal is to develop a regional implementation plan that will outline the information needed by stakeholders, including managers, policymakers, and industry, as well as the required observations, research, and communication mechanisms. This presentation will review these approaches, where we are to date, and the work that remains.

9 July 2015

Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 9 July 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Bioluminescence and Vision on the Deep-Sea Floor 2015
Presenter(s): Susan Haynes, Education Program Manager, NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and Dr. Tamara Frank, Expedition Chief Scientist, Nova Southeastern University, Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography
Date & Time: 9 July 2015
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only; see login info brlow
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Susan Haynes, Education Program Manager, NOAA Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) and Dr. Tamara Frank, Expedition Chief Scientist, Nova Southeastern University, Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER); webinar coordinator is Susan.Haynes@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3417317690860206593

Abstract:
This one-hour webinar for educators will introduce an ocean exploration mission taking place July 14-27 to explore the intriguing topic of bioluminescence in the depths of the Gulf of Mexico and associated education materials to bring this exciting, cutting edge science into the classroom.

Bio(s):
Susan Haynes is the Education Program Manager for NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and manages educator professional development programming. Dr. Tamara Frank is an associate professor at Nova Southeastern University in Davie/Fort Lauderdale, Florida and is the chief scientist for this NOAA OER expedition. Dr. Frank's research targets the biodiversity, distribution and visual ecology of pelagic animals (or animals in the water column), and how light controls their depth distributions. Recently, she has started studying the eyes of benthic animals (those that live on the sea floor) and how they may be adapted for seeing bioluminescence.

13 July 2015

Title: The Grell-Freitas scale- and aerosol aware stochastic convective parameterization: development as well as global and regional applications
Presenter(s): Georg Grell, NOAA ESRL
Date & Time: 13 July 2015
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Georg Grell, NOAA ESRL POC: Glenn White glenn.white@noaa.gov

Title:
The Grell-Freitas scale- and aerosol aware stochastic convective parameterization: development as well as global and regional applications Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/194295525 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (571) 317-3112 Access Code: 194-295-525

14 July 2015

Title: Leveraging the IOOS Regional Associations to Achieve Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) Goals - The SECOORA and OAP Partnership in the South Atlantic, including discussion of SOCAN
Presenter(s): Debra Hernandez, Director,Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association & Libby Jewett, Director, NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
Date & Time: 14 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: virtual attendance only; register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/398354529788484098
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Debra Hernandez, Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association & Libby Jewett, NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/398354529788484098

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program is working in close collaboration with the Southeast Coastal and Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) to maximize understanding of how changing ocean chemistry, especially OA, could impact marine resources in the Southeast region. In this webinar, NOAA's general approach to expanding OA understanding will be presented with special focus on what OAP does independently and together with IOOS, both in the Southeast and in other regions around the US. In addition, we will hear about SECOORA's operations and infrastructure, which can be leveraged to support OAP mission objectives. One of the joint projects between OAP and SECOORA has been the co-creation of the Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network (SOCAN) which brings together scientists, managers and stakeholders in an effort to understand the state-of-the-science regarding marine resources and ocean acidification in the southeast, and to determine gaps in both our knowledge and observing/monitoring. We will elaborate on the SOCAN process in an effort to open the discussion to the broader community on effective ways to engage additional stakeholders as we move forward.

15 July 2015

Title: Working with Community Can Make Difference in Marine Conservation, Gulf of Aqaba-Red Sea, Egypt
Presenter(s): Ayman Mabrouk, Ph.D., 2015 Sea Grant Fellow from Michigan State University, and Former Assistant Director for Nature Conservation at the Egyptian Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs
Date & Time: 15 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA, SSMC4, Rm 8150, 1305 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Part 3 of a Five-Part Series on Marine Conservation and Management Red Sea: Working with Community Can Make Difference in Marine Conservation, Gulf of Aqaba-Red Sea, Egypt

Presenter(s):
Ayman Mabrouk, Ph.D., 2015 Sea Grant Fellow from Michigan State University, and Former Assistant Director for Nature Conservation at the Egyptian Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Bio(s):
Ayman Mabrouk was born in Port Said, Egypt and graduated from the Suez Canal University in Ismailia Egypt in 1993 as a Marine Biologist. From 1995-2009, Ayman worked for the National Parks of Egypt, first as an environmental researcher and Manager of Nabq Protected Area, and then as a Manager of the South Sinai Protectorates, Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, Egypt. From 2009-2010 he was Assistant Director for the Nature Conservation Sector in Cairo, and mentor for the managers of marine protected areas of Egypt. Ayman was responsible for developing and implementing the strategic management plan for conserving the Egyptian Red Sea, and he assessed the performance of the MPAs there (178,360 mile²) in terms of conserving marine resources. In 2014 Ayman earned his Ph.D. in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University; his thesis was on “The role of marine protected areas in maintaining sustainable fisheries in the Egyptian Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea”. Currently Ayman is a Sea Grant Knauss fellow at the NOAA NCCOS Biogeography Branch.

Abstract:
Part 3: TBD

16 July 2015

Title: Overview of NOAA's Nautical Chart Adequacy Workshop
Presenter(s): Dr. Rochelle Wigley and Dr. Shachak Pe'eri, University of New Hampshire Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping
Date & Time: 16 July 2015
10:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, Conference Room 4552
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Rochelle Wigley and Dr. Shachak Pe'eri, University of New Hampshire Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping

Sponsor(s):
NOAA / NESDIS / Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) Contacts: Karen Marks " 301-683-3327 or Nolvia Herrera " 301-683-3308 karen.marks@noaa.gov or nolvia.herrera@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The International Hydrographic Office C-55 publication addresses the need to improve the collection, quality and availability of hydrographic data world-wide, while also monitoring and rectifying possible deficiencies and shortcomings that are presented on the chart. This task of evaluating the adequacy of nautical chart products poses a challenge to many national hydrographic offices. This stems from the dearth of readily available spatial information: namely, the lack of reliable and accessible vessel traffic data, and little means to assess the changing nature of both near-shore bathymetry and shoreline in a simple and reliable manner. A workshop was designed and developed internally at NOAA headquarters by Dr. Shachak Pe'eri and LTJG Anthony Klemm for International Hydrographic offices to use publically-available information. The goals of this workshop are: 1. Develop a chart adequacy assessment procedure using automatic-identification system (AIS) data and satellite-derived bathymetry (SDB) that can be applied in OCS. The procedure will be low cost and could be readily applied by HO's worldwide. 2. Train an international group of hydrographers through a two day workshop in Silver Spring, MD in summer 2015. 3. Replicate the methodology internationally 4. Develop a globally recognized, documented procedure for assessing chart adequacy based on the depth, main traffic routes and the last available survey in the area (without ranking based on regional/local geo-political prioritization, e.g., tourism or military). Also in attendance will be GEBCO Scholar students and workshop participants who may give short summaries of their work. Dial-In Information: Audio: USA participants " 1-866-832-9297, Passcode: 6070416 International: 203-566-7610
Title: Moistening Processes for Madden-Julian Oscillations
Presenter(s): Chung-Hsiun Sui, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
Date & Time: 16 July 2015
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - EMC Large Conf Rm - 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NCEP/CPC seminar Speaker Du. Sui is from U. of Taiwan POC: Jin Huang jin.huang@noaa.gov Telecon Information: GOTO meeting Web teleconference for the presentation will be available at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/join/ 714576893 Meeting ID: 714-576-893 The Dial-in number is: 1-877-680-3341 The Participant passcode is: 858747

Abstract:
A scale-separated moisture budget is calculated using the EC Interim reanalysis for the years 1982-2011. Each budget term is projected onto the intraseasonal moisture anomaly and its time tendency change at equatorial Indian Ocean. The projections and composite life cycle of the budget terms indicate that broad-scale advection by low-frequency and MJO flow and moisture fields are dominant moisture sources, while residual of moisture budget (-Q2) as dominant sink contributing to tendency term (propagation) and intaseasonal moisture anomaly (growth and decay). The pre-moistening in the low-troposphere by boundary-layer moisture convergence leading the deep convection is observed but only in the cloud developing to convective phase of MJOs. A budget analysis for the two MJOs over the Indian Ocean in Oct. and Nov. 2011 by using the special DYNAMO observations. The two MJOs exhibit different budget balances in pre-moistening stage from the suppressed phase to cloud developing phase when low-frequency vertical motion is downward (drying) in MJO1 but upward (moistening) in MJO2 that are balanced by negative Q2 (re-evaporation in non-raining cloud) in MJO1 and positive Q2 in MJO2. Nonlinear moisture advection by synoptic disturbances causes moistening in the suppress phase of the two MJOs. The above result reveals two moistening processes for the initiation of MJO over Indian Ocean: moistening by synoptic-scale or low-frequency easterly winds, or by shallow convection in large-scale suppressed condition; The two are being examined by numerical simulations using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) that is collaboratively developed, primarily by NCAR and LANL/DOE based on global nonhydrostatic framework using Voronoi Meshes, and a cloud resolving model, respectively.
Title: Bacteria vs. Hawaiian Sea Slug: Who is the anticancer producer?
Presenter(s): Dr. Jeanette Davis NOAA NMFS Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 16 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, United States
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jeanette Davis, NOAA NMFS Office of Science and Technology Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR NSG Seminar POC for questions: helen.cheng@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
For remote access via webinar for each of these seminars, please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. You must use the PHONE to call in for audio. BE SURE to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Mollusks are the largest group of marine invertebrates and are known to harbor bacterial communities; however, the characterization and metabolic roles of these communities to the biology of mollusks are unknown. Sacoglossans are specialized mollusks that are known for their ability to sequester chemicals from their algal diet through a process called kleptochemistry, enabling them to use such compounds as defense molecules in mucus secretion. The bacterial diversity associated with sacoglossans is not well understood. In this study, I coupled traditional cultivation-based methods with 454 pyrosequencing to examine the bacterial communities of the chemically defended Hawaiian sacoglossan Elysia rufescens and its secreted mucus. E. rufescens contains a defense molecule, kahalalide F, that is possibly of bacterial origin and is of interest because of its antifungal and anticancer properties. My results showed that there is a diverse bacterial assemblage associated with E. rufescens and its mucus with secreted mucus harboring higher bacterial richness than entire E. rufescens samples. The most abundant bacterial groups affiliated with E. rufescens and its mucus are Mycoplasma spp. and Vibrio spp., respectively.

20 July 2015

Title: The Operational Use of NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS processing System (NUCAPS)
Presenter(s): Dr Chris Barnet, Science and Technology Corporation in support of the JPSS Program
Date & Time: 20 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building 8th Floor Conference Room 10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham, MD 20706 and Via Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr Chris Barnet, Science and Technology Corporation in support of the JPSS Program

Sponsor(s):
Joint JPSS Science Seminar http://www.jpss.noaa.gov/ Point of contact: Bill Sjoberg (bill.sjoberg@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 Webinar------------------------------------------------------ 1. Go to https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=md334cf78178f1f94e04720a5d4309bbf 2. If requested, enter your name and email address. 3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: Jpss2015! 4. Click "Join". Abstract The NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS processing System (NUCAPS) is the operational retrieval system for sounding products from the Suomi National-Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP). NUCAPS produces cloud-cleared radiances from the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) field-of-regard that is co-located with the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) in order to provide information as close to the surface as possible. Numerous environmental data products (EDR) are derived from the cloud cleared radiances including, profiles of atmospheric temperature, moisture, ozone and other trace gases, cloud and surface products. Recently, NUCAPS products have been made available in both the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) and the Community Satellite Processing Package (CCSP). This presentation will summarize the results from a number of initiatives sponsored by the NOAA Joint Polar Satellite Systems (JPSS) Office (NJO). The first was participation in “CalWater-2015,” a field campaign focusing on variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the west coast of the United States. CSPP direct broadcast data was used to support flight planning and analysis of these mesoscale events. The second initiative was the use of AWIPS-II NUCAPS soundings in the Hazardous Weather Testbed 2015 Spring Experiment. Here National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters evaluated NUCAPS in developing convective environments. Many other on-going initiatives will also be discussed.

21 July 2015

Title: The impact of prescribed SST on Hurricane Edouard (2014) forecast with HWRF
Presenter(s): Juli Dong, NOAA/OAR/AOML
Date & Time: 21 July 2015
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC Seminar

Presenter(s):
Jili Dong, NOAA/OAR/AOML POC: Avichal Mehra -avichal.mehra@noaa.gov 1. GoToMeeting - MMAB (Mehra) https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/599995453 Meeting ID: 599-995-453 2. Join the conference call: 866-685-5896 8108134# Abstarct: Different sources of SST products are used to drive Hurricane Edouard (2014) forecast using HWRF with 3 km resolution to investigate the impact of SST on tropical cyclone prediction. Over 10 cycles of forecasts, track and intensity prediction doesn't show significant differences among those SST products, which include GFS, NCODA and RTOFS SST. However, in particular cycles, different SST products are able to affect Edouard's structure and intensity forecast. In the second part of this talk, a fully coupled HWRF-HYCOM system is used to examine the impact of 1D and 3D ocean models on hurricane forecasts in both an idealized framework and a real case (Hurricane Edouard 2014). The 1D HYCOM underestimates SST cooling due to the lack of Ekman pumping and the related ocean upwelling, leading to stronger storms prediction compared to the 3D ocean model.
Title: Better Arctic Ice Concentration Fields for Sea Ice Forecasting
Presenter(s): Florence Fetterer, National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences
Date & Time: 21 July 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Florence Fetterer, National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences

Sponsor(s):
NCEI Arctic Team POC: Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov)

Slides:
https://drive.google.com/a/noaa.gov/file/d/0BykhL0sbbiCERlZLNWMxeDhNTFE/view

Remote Access:
Webex: Click on http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c type in other required fields (i.e., your name, e-mail, organization; meeting number is 744868915; password is "science" -without quotation marks, password is case sensitive- ) indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy click on Proceed and follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Phone: 1-877-725-4068; 8634769#

Abstract:
“Forecast sea ice” is the first strategic goal in NOAA's Arctic Action Plan. The U.S. Navy, too, has a goal of making better short-term operational sea ice forecasts. The Naval Research Laboratory's 1/12° Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System (ACNFS) is a development platform for the operational model that runs at the Naval Oceanographic Office, producing forecasts of sea ice drift, concentration, thickness and more that are used by the National Ice Center (NIC) and by the NOAA National Weather Service. How good are predictions? One metric NRL uses to evaluate skill is to measure distance between forecast ice edge and the manually drawn ice edge given in a NIC ice edge product. To improve skill, NRL needed better ice concentration initialization fields. We developed a daily 4 km field from a blend of two other daily sea ice data products: ice coverage from MASIE, the Multisensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent product, and ice concentrations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2). MASIE extent and AMSR2 ice concentration data are blended together to take advantage of the best features of both products. MASIE is based on a NIC analysis product (the NOAA IMS snow and ice map) that uses multiple sensors and manual quality control of the data, and is more likely to be accurate in showing where ice is present than is AMSR2, while the AMSR2 sea ice concentration product gives concentration information not available from MASIE alone. NRL found that use of the methodology improved forecast skill substantially. Based on these results, the Naval Oceanographic Office began using the methodology in operational model runs in February 2015. NOAA@NSIDC hosts a prototype of the product, “MASAM2”, at http://nsidc.org/data/g10005, and will begin updating it on a daily basis in late 2015. NOAA@NSIDC has developed or published other data products that have origins with operational groups such as the U.S. Navy or commercial interests. These will be briefly mentioned. About the speaker: Florence Fetterer is with the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and has been NSIDC's liaison to NOAA since 1996. With support from NOAA NESDIS NCEI she manages NOAA@NSIDC where many of NSIDCs non-satellite and pre-satellite era data sets reside. Florence has an M.S. in Physical Oceanography from Old Dominion University and misses the ocean dreadfully.See http://nsidc.org/research/bios/fetterer.html
Title: Getting to Restoration via Natural Resource Damage Assessment
Presenter(s): Tom Brosnan, NOAA Office of Response and Restoration, Assessment & Restoration Division; and Jason Lehto, NOAA Fisheries, Restoration Center
Date & Time: 21 July 2015
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Web only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Tom Brosnan (NOAA Office of Response and Restoration, Assessment & Restoration Division) and Jason Lehto (NOAA Fisheries, Restoration Center) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of Response and Restoration, NOAA Restoration Center, Restore America's Estuaries, Consortium for Ocean Leadership Seminar Point of contact: Meg Imholt, meg.imholt@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register at bit.ly/NRDA101

Abstract:
Oil spills, ship groundings, and hazardous waste sites threaten coastal communities and ecosystems across the country, but NOAA's Damage Assessment, Remediation, and Restoration Program is working to bring restoration to where it's needed most. Right now, NOAA and co-trustees are working on more than 100 cases and have recovered more than $2.3 billion to fund restoration solutions like creating marshes, building fishing piers and removing dams. Learn more about the program and how to get involved in a case near you.

22 July 2015

Title: Plain Language, Writing for Clarity and Impact with your Readers in Mind
Presenter(s): Frances Pflieger, Writer/Editor, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 22 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Frances Pflieger, Writer/Editor, NOAA Fisheries

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866‐833‐7307, participant code is code 8986360# . Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts. Seminar

Sponsor(s):
The NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Subcommittee and the NOAA Central Library. Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301‐713‐2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301‐713‐2600 ext. 118).

Abstract:
This presentation is for you, if you write: Public Outreach Documents, Web Page Content Budget Justification Narratives, Policy or Guidance Documents, Quarterly/Annual Accomplishment Reports, Instructions, of any sort. Plain language (also called Plain English) is the communication readers can understand the first time they read or hear it. Written material is in plain language if readers can: Find what they need. Understand what they find. Use what they find to meet their needs. No one technique defines plain language. rather, plain language is defined by results-it is easy to read, understand, and use.

Bio(s):
Frances Pflieger is a writer/editor for NOAA Fisheries in Silver Spring.
Title: Defying the ocean acidification odds: what Palau's low-pH coral reefs can tell us about the future of the world's reef ecosystems
Presenter(s): Hannah Barkley, PhD candidate, MIT-WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography
Date & Time: 22 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA, SSMC4, Rm 8150, 1305 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Hannah Barkley, PhD candidate, MIT-WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed.

Abstract:
Ocean acidification threatens the survival of coral reef ecosystems. Lab experiments and studies of naturally low-pH reefs suggest that declining ocean pH could decrease coral calcification, accelerate reef bioerosion, and drive significant shifts in coral reef community structure and function before the end of this century. However, we recently discovered highly diverse coral reefs in the Rock Islands of Palau that are currently thriving at predicted 2100 pH levels. These healthy, coral-dominated, and net calcifying reef communities suggest that coral reef ecosystem responses to ocean acidification may vary, with significant implications for coral reef conservation under 21st century climate change.

Bio(s):
Hannah Barkley is a graduate student in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography. She received an A.B. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University in 2011, and is currently pursuing a PhD in the department of Marine Geology and Geophysics (expected 2016). Her research focuses on coral reef conservation under climate change and identifying coral reefs that are resilient to increasing ocean temperature and ocean acidification.
Title: Impacts of Oil Spills on Florida Coastal Habitats
Presenter(s): Patricia Dalyander, Research Oceanographer at USGS, et al. see description
Date & Time: 22 July 2015
1:00 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: 13051 Telecom Dr, Temple Terrace, FL 33637, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Patricia Dalyander, Research Oceanographer at USGS; Mike McCoy, Assistant Professor of Ecology at East Carolina University; Ed Proffitt, Associate Professor at Florida Atlantic University; and Jacqueline Michel, Research Planning, Inc. Seminar sponsor: NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), Sea Grant, Sea Grant in the Gulf of Mexico (Florida Sea Grant, Louisiana Sea Grant, Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant, Texas Sea Grant)

Remote Access:
Fill out survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/coastalimpacts to register to attend or receive log in/call in information.

Abstract:
Please join the Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant Oil Spill Outreach Team and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection for the oil spill seminar: Impacts of Oil on Coastal Habitats. Scientists will be sharing their work on the effects of oil on salt marshes, wetlands, mangroves, and beaches. Seminar POC for questions: robin.garcia@noaa.gov (301-734-1181)

24 July 2015

Title: Results from Evaluating Different GOES-R Scanning Strategies at the Operations Proving Ground
Presenter(s): Chad Gravelle, NWS/OPG, UW-CIMSS
Date & Time: 24 July 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars

Presenter(s):
Chad M. Gravelle (NWS/OPG, UW-CIMSS) & Kim J. Runk (NWS/OPG)

Remote Access:
Conference Line: 844-467-6272 Passcode: 106985# Webinar Registration: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3295916214164142337 Webinar ID: 131-063-771 Seminar

Sponsor(s):
GOES-R Science Seminar (Steve Goodman). Contacts: Steve Goodman: Steven.J.Goodman@noaa.gov or Janel Thomas: Janel.Thomas@noaa.gov.

Abstract:
Between February and April of 2015, the National Weather Service (NWS) Operations Proving Ground (OPG) hosted and facilitated an evaluation of the usefulness of 1-minute satellite imagery for NWS operations in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-R Series era. The overarching goal of the evaluation was to provide quantitative and qualitative guidance to NWS management, including the regional NWS Scientific Services Division Chiefs, on how satellite imagery with a refresh rate of 1 minute impacts NWS forecaster decision making. In total, seventeen NWS forecasters completed eight simulations that were developed using imagery from the 2013 and 2014 GOES-14 Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R. During the simulations, forecasters evaluated 1-minute and 5-minute satellite imagery scanning modes while completing tasks ranging from aviation forecasting and wildfire decision support services to monitoring where convective initiation would occur and integrating the imagery into the convective warning decision-making process. Each week, feedback was gathered to assess if the satellite imagery had influence on forecaster decision making, if the satellite imagery provided them with more confidence in making those decisions, if forecasters could assimilate the data into operational practices, and if there was adverse impact on forecaster workload. Forecasters overwhelming felt that 1-minute satellite imagery improved their ability and increased their confidence to make effective forecast and warning decisions. The majority of participants explained that their conceptual models were more refined with the 1-minute imagery and that it was most useful in the wildfire, fog and low stratus, and convective initiation simulations. In these simulations, the vast majority of participants also expressed that they were able to internally assimilate the imagery with ease. However, the feedback gathered when forecasters were asked how useful and easy the imagery was to use in convective warning operations was mixed. Some forecasters felt that it was difficult incorporating the satellite information while issuing convective warnings with radar data, while others felt that with ample training and experience the imagery would be invaluable in warning operations. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the evaluation and a detailed analysis of the forecaster feedback with recommendations on incorporating 1-minute satellite imagery in the GOES-R era.

28 July 2015

Title: Modeling ocean circulation and biogeochemical variability in the Southeast U.S. coastal ocean and Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Ruoying He, Professor of Oceanography in the Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University
Date & Time: 28 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual attendance only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7372244523776342786
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ruoying He, North Carolina State University

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7372244523776342786

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Changing climate and rising atmospheric CO2 coupled with impacts of human activity, have the potential to dramatically alter coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes and associated movement of water, carbon, and nutrients through various terrestrial reservoirs. Such changes will result in dramatic alterations in terrestrial environments, biogeochemistry, and delivery of dissolved and particulate materials into rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters. This may lead to vulnerabilities of coastal ecosystems to warming temperatures, stratification, altered freshwater and nutrient exports, eutrophication, hypoxia, and ocean acidification. Further, coastal and open ocean waters are impacted directly by increasing atmospheric CO2, compounding the effects. This presentation will describe a coupled physical-biogeochemical modeling effort that is aimed at stimulating and examining temporal and spatial variability of coastal circulation and biogeochemical cycling in the southeast U.S. coastal ocean and Gulf of Mexico. The model is driven by realistic atmospheric forcing, open boundary conditions from a data assimilative global ocean circulation model, and observed (or model predicted) freshwater and terrestrial nitrogen input from major rivers. Long-term model simulations were performed, and validated against in-situ and satellite observations. The ultimate goal is todevelop a regional impact assessment and predictive capabilities for coastal ocean ecosystems in the southeast U.S. and Gulf of Mexico to support decision making and management of the combined impacts of ocean acidification (OA), eutrophication, and hypoxia, and to offer a wider marine ecosystem context for carbonate system measurements and monitoring undertaken by NOAA and other agencies.
Title: Ten Years Since Hurricane Katrina: Progress in Hurricane Modeling, Prediction, Decision Support, and Coastal Resilience
Presenter(s): Rick Knabb, Gerry Bell, Robert Atlas, Steven Goodman, Vijay Tallapragada, Jeff Payne, Tom Knutson, Jim Kossin and Mel Landrey, all from NOAA
Date & Time: 28 July 2015
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar only - see remote access info below.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Knabb, Gerry Bell, Robert Atlas, Steven Goodman, Vijay Tallapragada, Jeff Payne, Tom Knutson, Jim Kossin and Mel Landrey - all from NOAA). Visit the site below for speakers' names, affiliations, and abstracts: http://cpo.noaa.gov/ClimatePrograms/ModelingAnalysisPredictionsandProjections/MAPPNewsEvents/TabId/506/artmid/1256/articleid/309639/

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Climate Program Office; point of contact is Daniel.Barrie@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
See link above. Please share your connection with others as space is limited. Abstracts: See link above

29 July 2015

Title: The Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Framework: a spatial framework, database and tools to meet the needs of Great Lakes management and research
Presenter(s): Dr. Catherine Riseng, Assistant Research Scientist, University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment and Dr. Kevin Wehrly, Research Biologist, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, adjunct professor at the University of Michigan
Date & Time: 29 July 2015
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. Catherine Riseng, Assistant Research Scientist, University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment and Dr. Kevin Wehrly, Research Biologist, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, adjunct professor at the University of Michigan Seminar sponsor: NOAA, OAR, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory

Remote Access:
Go to Webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6888580353727961857 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Abstract:
The Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Framework (GLAHF) is a web-accessible spatial framework and database for use by managers, planners, researchers, and restoration specialists across the basin. The database includes available physical, chemical and biological data across the entire Great Lakes basin and these data are georeferenced to a common spatial grid, the framework. The database includes data from multiple agencies, researchers, and NGOs that has been cross-walked and integrated in to a common database resulting in consistent basin-wide information. The hierarchical spatial framework provides spatial linkages among tributary watersheds, coastal/nearshore, and offshore zones allowing users to “zoom in” to manage specific problems at specific locations and to “zoom out” to identify overarching issues for effective policy making. Great Lakes agencies, managers, and researchers commonly express a need for publically accessible habitat data and decision support tools that can be applied to the multitude of problems that face aquatic ecosystems throughout the basin. The GLAHF project team has been developing a number of tools to assist with habitat monitoring, assessment, and prioritization for protection and restoration including: a scalable habitat classification framework; a GIS data viewer and server; a web-based decision support system to facilitate research and management activities in the Great Lakes; and, are conducting a coastal condition assessment. The GLAHF project and tools have been developed based on feedback from entities directly involved with making management decisions in the basin and address their specific information needs. Seminar POC for questions: margaret.lansing@noaa.gov
Title: Virtual Lab (VLab): A System for Software Project Collaboration for NOAA and It's Partners
Presenter(s): Peter Rochford, Ph.D., Coastal Ocean Modeler, CSS-Dynamac and NCCOS/COAST
Date & Time: 29 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Peter Rochford, Ph.D., Coastal Ocean Modeler, CSS-Dynamac and NCCOS/COAST

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
VLab is a set of services and Information Technology (IT) framework provided by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) which enables NOAA employees and their partners to share ideas, collaborate, engage in software development, and conduct applied research. VLab communities allow users with common interest to collaborate using tools like forums, blogs, wikis, document libraries, web forms, and workflows. VLab Development Services provide users with integrated project management, issue tracking, software repositories, continuous integration, and code review tools. This seminar will briefly review and demonstrate the capabilities of VLab with the view of facilitating and fostering the sharing of software projects across branch offices in NOAA as well as outside agencies.

Bio(s):
Dr. Peter Rochford is a Coastal Ocean Modeler supporting the Coastal Ocean Assessments, Status, and Trends (COAST) Branch of NOAA. He is currently taking the lead in transitioning a Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) model for the Gulf of Maine to an operational forecast system. This task requires the collaborative development and transition of software between three NOAA branches as well as outside academic agencies. A means to easily undertake software project collaboration between multiple groups within and outside NOAA is what lead him to investigate and start using VLab.
Title: Dolphinfish horizontal and vertical movements and population structure in the western central Atlantic
Presenter(s): Wessley Merten, Ph.D., Foreign Affairs Fellow, NOAA Fisheries Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection
Date & Time: 29 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Science on a Sphere SSMC3 Ground Floor
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Wessley Merten, Ph.D., Foreign Affairs Fellow, NOAA Fisheries Office of International Affairs and Seafood Inspection

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/OAR Knauss Brown Bag Seminar Series; point of contact is carolina.mosley@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
To join the meeting: http://connectpro46305642.adobeconnect.com/dolphinfish/ If you have never attended an Adobe Connect meeting before: Test your connection: http://connectpro46305642.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm Get a quick overview: http://www.adobe.com/products/adobeconnect.html Abstracts: 1. Vertical Movements: The vertical movements of six adult male dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) (95"120 cm estimated fork length), caught using standard sportfishing methods, were investigated using high-rate single-point pop-up satellite archival transmitters from 2005 to 2011 in the western central Atlantic. Data revealed a diel activity pattern within the mixed surface layer with dives below the thermocline suggesting temperature is not a barrier to vertical movements for short periods of time. 2. US East Coast: Conventional mark and recapture (n = 306 recaptures) and satellite monitoring data (n = 6 transmitters) were used to examine small and large scale dispersal and movement patterns of dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) along the U.S. east coast. Movement rates were dependent upon region, latitude, and distance from shore released. Movements from Florida to the South-Atlantic Bight (SAB) (44.67 ± 39.53 km/d) and Florida to northeastern North Carolina (MAB) (44.62 ± 15.31 km/d) had the highest observed rates, while movements within the SAB were the slowest (11.80 ± 27.94 km/d). 3. Bahamas: Dolphinfish [n = 1188; 35"152.5 cm FL; mean: 73.78 (SD 16.58) cm FL] movements relative to The Bahamas were examined using conventional plastic dart tags (PDTs) and single point pop-up satellite archival tags (n= 2; 107.5 and 120 cm); these movements were compared to surface drifter tracks (n = 144) in the region from 2004 to 2012. Movements within The Bahamas were to the south in the Tongue of the Ocean, Northeast Providence Channel, and Exuma Sound, ranging from 4 to 23 DAL. However, the majority of dolphinfish released in the Tongue of the Ocean showed little net dispersal (<1 km) after 5"77 DAL. 4. NE Caribbean Sea: Distinct spatial variation and fisheries exchange routes for dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) were resolved relative to the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean Sea using conventional (n=742; mean ± SD cm FL: 70.5 ± 15.2 cm FL) and pop-up satellite archival tags (n=7; 117.6 ± 11.7 cm FL) from 2008-2014. Movements were westward (274.42o ± 21.06o5 ), but slower in the tropical Atlantic than Caribbean Sea, with a maximum straight-line distance recorded between San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Charleston, South Carolina (1,917.49 km); the path distance of a 180-d Geolocation track was estimated at 12,998.55 km from the South Atlantic Bight to the northern limits of the Mona Passage. 5. Population Structure: The dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) is of major recreational and commercial importance with landings increasing in recent years around Puerto Rico, throughout the Caribbean Sea, and along the U.S. east coast, yet its genetic structure among these localities is uncertain. A portion of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1; 1288 bp) gene was used at two spatial scales to investigate the population structure of dolphinfish.
Title: Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean just published in Nature
Presenter(s): Joe Resing, PhD, Researcher, NOAA-Earth Oceans Interactions Program and Affiliate Assistant Professor, School of Oceanography, University of Washington
Date & Time: 29 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, Silver Spring
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Joe Resing, PhD, Researcher, NOAA-Earth Oceans Interactions Program and Affiliate Assistant Professor, School of Oceanography, University of Washington Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library. Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301‐713‐2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301‐713‐2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866‐833‐7307, participant code is 8986360# . Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Volcanic eruptions and hot springs located beneath the sea surface are visually impressive, with hot chemically enriched water nurturing diverse ecosystems and producing ore-grade mineral deposits. However, until now it has been believed that the ocean-wide impacts of these phenomena on human time-scales was very limited. In particular, it has been generally thought that one of the most prevalent elements in hydrothermal vent fluids, iron, is lost from solution close to its volcanic sources, thereby making this source of iron of limited importance to large-scale ocean biogeochemistry. Our results from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) challenge this long-standing view by demonstrating the transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron more than 4,000 kilometres from the southern East Pacific Rise westward across the Pacific Ocean. Because iron is an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle, knowledge of its sources is essential if we are to understand the role of oceans in climate regulation. To better understand the role of hydrothermal iron we placed our observations from the EPZT within a global-scale ocean model and discovered that hydrothermal iron may be responsible for a significant amount of phytoplankton growth and carbon dioxide uptake in the Southern Ocean. A significant portion of this carbon is then exported from the ocean surface to the deep sea; 15 to 30 percent of this carbon export in the Southern Ocean is supported by hydrothermal iron. While this study primarily concerns hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridges, there are many, much shallower submarine volcanoes in the ocean that may be even more effective (although more ephemeral) sources of iron to the ocean. This presentation will discuss both sources and their potential impacts on the ocean. Finally, given increasing interest in exploiting hydrothermally produced mineral deposits, some potential impacts of seafloor mining will be briefly discussed.

Bio(s):
Dr. Resing received his Ph.D from the University of Hawaii in 1997. While in Hawaii, he studied the impact of lava flowing into the sea from Kilauea volcano on the Big Island. He is interested in how the solid earth interacts with the ocean and, in particular,how submarine eruptions and hydrothermal circulation impact the biogeochemistry of the ocean. He has more than 75 scientific publications on studies ranging from the chemistry of the surface oceans, the chemistry of hydrothermal plumes, and the impact of recent eruptions on the ocean. Of local note, Joe grew up in Washington DC and attended St. Anselm's Abbey school.
Title: Recent Advancements of Verification Capability within Model Evaluation Tools (MET) and METViewer
Presenter(s): Tara L. Jensen, NCAR/Research Applications Laboratory, Boulder, CO
Date & Time: 29 July 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar EMC Seminar

Title:
Recent Advancements of Verification Capability within Model Evaluation Tools (MET) and METViewer Speaker Tara L. Jensen NCAR/Research Applications Laboratory, Boulder, CO Developmental Testbed Center, Boulder, CO POC: Perry Shafran perry.shafran@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Go to meeting Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/489848661 United States : +1 (224) 501-3412 Access Code: 489-848-661 The presentation is posted at http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2015/TJensen_NCEP_29July2015.pptx

Abstract:
At the foundation of the DTC testing and evaluation (T&E) system is the Model Evaluation Tools (MET) and METViewer database and display system. MET is supported to the community through the DTC and METViewer is currently being installed at NCEP by NCO. The verification team within the DTC has been working closely with DTC teams as well as the operational community to enhance MET to better support both internal T&E activities and testing performed across NOAA. This presentation will demonstrate several advancements that will be available in the next MET release, which is scheduled for later this summer. Specifically, we have added automated regridding capability, processing capability for Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation diagnostic files, tools to produce complex masking regions for tailored verification, the calculation of categorical statistics for tropical cyclone rapid intensification and rapid weakening (RI/RW) events and renewables ramp events, and the use of Method for Object-based Diagnostic Evaluation " Time Domain (MODE-TD) on different spatial and temporal scales of data. The presentation will also demonstrate some of the METViewer capabilities that will be available inside the NCEP firewall soon.
Title: The Science of Debris-flow and Landslide Early Warning
Presenter(s): Dr. Jonathan Godt, Coordinator of the U.S. Geological Survey Landslide Hazards Program
Date & Time: 29 July 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: North Central River Forecast Center, Chanhassen, MN
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jonathan Godt, Coordinator of the U.S. Geological Survey Landslide Hazards Program Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Weather Service, North Central River Forecast Center Point of Contact: Pedro.Restrepo@noaa.gov (952)368-2526

Remote Access:
https://join.me/nws-northcentral For Audio: Dial toll free: 866-440-7702. Enter passcode: 1743178832#

Abstract:
The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Weather Service (NWS) began collaborating ten years ago to develop and implement debris-flow early warning. This system, currently operational for burned areas in southern California, provides emergency managers in the region with critical information needed for response to hydrological hazards in post-wildfire landscapes. Looking ahead, the USGS is working towards expanding the partnership to other parts of the western US. In this talk, Dr. Jonathan Godt will provide a summary of the state of landslide science in the USGS and discuss research and operational needs to advance debris-flow and landslide early warning.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jonathan Godt is the Coordinator of the U.S. Geological Survey Landslide Hazards Program and is based in Golden Colorado. He leads a team of Federal, academic, and international scientists who focus on understanding the hydrology and mechanics of landslides. He holds a B.A. in Political Science from Purdue University, and a M.S. in Environmental Science and Ph.D. in Physical Geography from the University of Colorado. In 18 years with the USGS he has co-authored 80 scientific papers and reports on landslide topics, including a recently published textbook on the subject. Location: North Central River Forecast Center, Chanhassen, MN

4 August 2015

Title: Communicating Uncertainty about Climate Change
Presenter(s): Tarlie Townsend, Visiting Scholar at Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs
Date & Time: 4 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2nd Floor, Silver Spring, Maryland
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series; Contact: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov or Albert.E.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Tarlie Townsend, Visiting Scholar at Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866‐833‐7307, participant code is code 8986360# . Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
"[I]t has long been conventional wisdom in the climate change research and policy community that any perception by the public that there is uncertainty in the science behind climate change and its attribution to human actions has been and will continue to be the death knell for effective policy-making to combat it." - Patt and Weber, 2014 What happens when laypeople hear scientific predictions containing uncertainty? In the U.S., scientific uncertainty about the specific impacts of climate change has been misinterpreted as implying that scientists aren't agreed that anthropogenic climate change is happening at all. Is such confusion a given when communicating uncertainty to the public? How does uncertainty information influence people's trust in the information source, their perception of the risk, and the decisions they ultimately make? Tarlie will present a broad review of the psychological findings on uncertainty communication. One takeaway will be that it matters how uncertainty information is communicated. Should we use numbers, words, or pictures? Frequencies or percentages? In the second part of this talk, Tarlie will introduce some common pitfalls in the presentation of uncertainty information, along with some best practices and open questions.

Bio(s):
After completing her B.S. in neuroscience and her B.A. in Germanic Studies, Tarlie spent a year studying risk and uncertainty communication at Berlin's Max Planck Institute for Human Development, where she was a DAAD Scholar. She then took what she had learned into the field: as a Henry Luce Scholar working in Vietnam's Ministry of Science and Technology, she and her colleagues used field experiments to investigate how rural Vietnamese perceive climate change and uncertainty. Tarlie will begin an MPP at the University of Michigan's Ford School of Public Policy this fall, where she will continue to research risk and uncertainty communication.
Title: Advances in Aerial Geospatial Sensors Technologies - a Presentation and Invite to Discussion!
Presenter(s): Qassim Abdullah, Ph.D., Senior Geospatial Scientist and Associate, Woolpert, Inc.
Date & Time: 4 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150, 1305 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Qassim Abdullah, Ph.D., Senior Geospatial Scientist and Associate, Woolpert, Inc.

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; seminar point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov or Ashley.Chappell@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. Audio is via phone: dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code needed for web.

Abstract:
The goal of this seminar is to provide a dynamic forum to address current advances in aerial geospatial sensors technologies and data processing as it relates to the Geiger mode and photon counting Lidar, UAS, large format digital cameras, and mobile Lidar. Among the topics to be presented are the following:

Bio(s):
Besides being Woolpert's Senior Geospatial Scientist and Associate, Dr. Abdullah is an adjunct professor at both the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and the Penn State University. He has published more than 50 technical papers and reports throughout his career. He is a member of the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), and was the 2010 recipient of the organization's prestigious Fairchild Award. He is also a member of the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE) and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). Dr. Abdullah recently co-published the new “ASPRS Positional Accuracy Standards for Digital Geospatial Data”.

5 August 2015

Title: Representativeness of Marine Protected Areas of the United States
Presenter(s): Robert Brock, Ph.D., Marine Biologist, NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center
Date & Time: 5 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Robert Brock, Ph.D.,Marine Biologist, NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
In 2000, President Clinton signed Executive Order (EO) 13158 to “preserve representative habitats in different geographic regions of the marine environment.” The NOAA Marine Protected Area (MPA) Center concluded that nationally, 70% of habitat types, 82% of birds, invertebrates and algal ecosystem features, 71% of fish, marine mammal or sea turtle features and 87% of ecologically important ecosystem features within the 19 marine ecoregions of the U.S. are found in at least one National System MPA in each ecoregion. 89% of the nation's MPAs contain zero “no-take” areas, indicating no additional protection from extraction. This presentation will discuss the spatial distribution of MPAs and what this analysis is and is not.

Bio(s):
Dr. Robert Brock is a Marine Biologist in the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center in Silver Spring, MD. Robert holds a B.S. in Environmental Studies (Marine Ecology) from Florida International University; an M.S. in Marine Biology from the Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center; and a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering Sciences (Aquatic Biology) from the University of Florida's Center for Wetlands. His previous positions include a Fishery Biologist with the NOAA Fisheries Service, Supervisory Marine Biologist with the National Park Service, Marine Biologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Hydrologist (Biology) with the U.S. Geological Survey.
Title: The Argos Data Collection and Location System-40 Years and Counting
Presenter(s): DSB)
Date & Time: 5 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC3, 2nd Floor, Silver Spring, Md
Description:



Presenter(s):
Scott Rogerson, NOAA/NESDIS Office of Satellite and Product Operations (OSPO), Satellite Products and Services Division (SPSD), Direct Services Branch (DSB) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library. Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301‐713‐2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301‐713‐2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866‐833‐7307, participant code is 8986360# . Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
The Argos Data Collection and Location System (DCS) consists of instruments provided by the French Space Agency on polar-orbiting satellites operated by NOAA, EUMETSAT, and the Indian Space Research Organization. Nearly 2,000 users in over 100 countries currently collect data from over 21,000 active platforms, including a wide variety of wildlife, meteorological and oceanographic equipment, commercial fishing vessels, and merchant ships. A brief history, overview of the Argos system, and diversity of user applications will be provided-with a focus on current NOAA applications and the next (fifth) decade of operations

Bio(s):
Scott Rogerson has been the Argos DCS program manager for NESDIS/OSPO since August of 2010. Before joining NOAA, he served as an officer in the U.S. Coast Guard for 21 years, including command of two patrol boats, teaching marine science at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, and two tours at the International Ice Patrol, where he was responsible for monitoring the iceberg danger near the Grand Banks of Newfoundland and providing the limit of all known ice to the maritime community. (Scott Rogerson, NOAA/NESDIS Office of Satellite and Product Operations (OSPO), Satellite Products and Services Division (SPSD), Direct Services Branch

11 August 2015

Title: Probabilistic and Deterministic Forecasting using Evolutionary Program Ensembles
Presenter(s): Paul Roebber, University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee
Date & Time: 11 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Title:
Probabilistic and Deterministic Forecasting using Evolutionary Program Ensembles

Presenter(s):
Paul Roebber, University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee POC:Geoff DiMego geoff.dimego@noaa.gov Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/259692821 You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 259-692-821

Abstract:
Charles Darwin wrote: “Can it … be thought improbable … that other variations useful in some way to each being in the great and complex battle of life, should sometimes occur in the course of thousands of generations? If such do occur, can we doubt … that individuals having any advantage, however slight … would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind?” This is the conceptual basis of evolutionary programming (EP), a process in which simulated evolution is used to find solutions to problems as diverse as the sorting of numbers and forecasting minimum temperature. Despite a history in computer sciences dating back to the 1960s, the application of this idea to meteorological studies is relatively new. Recently, EP has been adapted to the weather domain in order to generate large member ensemble forecasts for minimum temperature, maximum temperature, wind power, and heavy rainfall (Roebber 2013; Roebber 2015abc). These studies have shown that the method can provide greater probabilistic and deterministic skill, particularly at the extremes, than post-processed numerical weather prediction (NWP) ensembles. Further research has shown that this skill advantage persists out to longer ranges, where the forecast signal is presumably weaker. The method can be understood as follows. Suppose that we have a well-defined problem with a clear measure of success (e.g., root-mean-square-error), and for which we can construct solutions by performing various mathematical operations on a set of inputs. In this case, it is possible to develop a single computer program that generates algorithms which solve the defined problem by applying various operators and coefficients to the inputs. The level of success or "fitness" of a particular solution can then be measured. The idea of fitness invokes evolutionary principles and suggests that if one starts from a very large set of random initial algorithms and allows fit algorithms to propagate some portion of their components to the next generation, then it may be possible to produce improved algorithms over time. This culling of the population in favor of stronger individuals through maximizing fitness and the exchange of "genetic material" between fit algorithms drives the progress towards improved solutions. Since weather forecast problems are nonlinear with non-unique solutions, evolved programs are a new means for generating a set of skillful but independent solutions. The algorithms resemble multiple linear or nonlinear regression equations, but with conditionals that allow for special circumstances to be accounted for as a routine outcome of the data search (e.g., the impact of snow cover on temperature under conditions of clear skies and light winds; Roebber 2010). In this talk, I will discuss the EP concept and its most recent meteorological forms, including examples from various applications of the method. Roebber (2015abc) modified the technique to incorporate various forms of genetic exchange, disease, mutation, and the training of solutions within ecological niches, and to produce an adaptive form that can account for changing local conditions (such as changing flow regimes) as well as improved forecast inputs " thus, once initial training is completed, the ensemble will adapt automatically as forecasts are produced. I will outline efforts to mitigate the tendency for EP ensembles to exhibit under dispersion as with NWP ensembles and the concept of balancing the minimization of root-mean-square error with the maximization of ensemble diversity. I will then conclude with a discussion of outstanding questions regarding the method and future research directions. Roebber, P.J., 2010: Seeking consensus: A new approach. Mon. Wea. Rev., 138, 4402-4415. Roebber, P.J., 2013: Using evolutionary programming to generate skillful extreme value probabilistic forecasts. Mon. Wea Rev., 141, 3170-3185. Roebber, P.J., 2015a: Evolving ensembles. Mon. Wea Rev., 143, 471-490. Roebber, P.J., 2015b: Ensemble MOS and evolutionary program minimum temperature forecast skill. Mon. Wea. Rev., in press. Roebber, P.J., 2015c: Adaptive evolutionary programming. Mon. Wea. Rev., in press.
Title: Reprise: Defying the ocean acidification odds: what Palau's low-pH coral reefs can tell us about the future of the world's reef ecosystems
Presenter(s): Hannah Barkley, PhD candidate, MIT-WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography
Date & Time: 11 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA, SSMC4, Rm 8150, 1305 East-Wesy Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Note: This seminar is being offered a second time because there was a problem with the webinar. The first presentation was on 7/22/15.

Presenter(s):
Hannah Barkley, PhD candidate, MIT-WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio is over the phone: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web.

Abstract:
Ocean acidification threatens the survival of coral reef ecosystems. Lab experiments and studies of naturally low-pH reefs suggest that declining ocean pH could decrease coral calcification, accelerate reef bioerosion, and drive significant shifts in coral reef community structure and function before the end of this century. However, we recently discovered highly diverse coral reefs in the Rock Islands of Palau that are currently thriving at predicted 2100 pH levels. These healthy, coral-dominated, and net calcifying reef communities suggest that coral reef ecosystem responses to ocean acidification may vary, with significant implications for coral reef conservation under 21st century climate change.

Bio(s):
Hannah Barkley is a graduate student in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography. She received an A.B. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University in 2011, and is currently pursuing a PhD in the department of Marine Geology and Geophysics (expected 2016). Her research focuses on coral reef conservation under climate change and identifying coral reefs that are resilient to increasing ocean temperature and ocean acidification.

12 August 2015

Title: NOAA's Teacher at Sea Program
Presenter(s): Jennifer Hammond, Director, NOAA's Teacher at Sea Program and Jenn Annetta, Alumni Coordinator, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation
Date & Time: 12 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jennifer Hammond, Director, NOAA's Teacher at Sea Program and Jenn Annetta, Alumni Coordinator, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation

Remote Access:
For audio dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For webcast go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event" and add conf no: 744925156. No code for webcast.

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series: coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Since its inception in 1990, the mission of NOAA's Teacher at Sea Program (TAS) is to provide kindergarten through college-level teachers with hands-on, real-world research experience working at sea with world-renowned NOAA scientists, thus giving them unique insight into oceanic and atmospheric research crucial to the nation. The program provides a unique opportunity for teachers to sail aboard NOAA research vessels and work under the tutelage of scientists and crew. By participating in this program, teachers profoundly enrich their classroom curricula, enhance their approaches to teaching science, and engage their local community with knowledge that can only be gained by living and working with scientists who contribute to the world's oceanic and atmospheric scientific research.

Bio(s):
Jennifer Hammond is the Director of NOAA's TAS Program. She began managing the Program in 2003; her primary responsibilities are to manage the program budget and operations, establish partnerships, and lead the TAS team. Jennifer has worked with NOAA scientists to secure berths for over 300 teachers, and she led the program to celebrate its 25th Anniversary this year. Jenn Annetta is the Alumni Coordinator for the TAS Program and began in 2011. She is responsible for communicating with teachers when they return from sea, organizing alumni events and workshops, and making sure that teachers complete program requirements. Regional alumni networks are now developed in New England and the Mid-Atlantic with plans to spread throughout the country.

13 August 2015

Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 13 August 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

17 August 2015

Title: Issues in Developing and Validating Satellite Land Surface Temperature Product
Presenter(s): Yunyue Yu, STAR, LST lead
Date & Time: 17 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Aerospace Building Room 8007 (10210 Greenbelt Rd Lanham, MD 20706 )
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Yunyue Yu (STAR, LST lead) Host: JPSS/GOES-R PROVING GROUND SEMINAR POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Phone: 877-401-9225; 53339716# Webex: Remote Access webinar--------------------------------------------- 1. Go to https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mcb5a21794a0d607e0de269d2d8ff4cfd 2. If requested, enter your name and email address. 3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: Jpss2015! 4. Click "Join".

Abstract:
Information on land surface temperature (LST) is important for understanding climate change, modeling the hydrological and biogeochemical cycles, and is a prime candidate parameter for Numerical Weather Prediction assimilation models. Satellite LST product has been one of major products of most meteorological satellite missions for decades. Recently, Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has accepted a recommendation from the International LST and Emissivity Working Group (ILSTE-WG) for adding satellite radiometric LST into its list of Essential Climate Variables (ECVs). However, it is well-known that quality of LST production is significantly lower comparing to the satellite production for sea surface temperature (SST) using the same sensor data. Applications of the satellite LST product have been significantly restricted due to such low-quality status, which constrains investment of the LST development from the management. In this presentation, some issues of the LST product development and validation will be discussed based on our duties on LST production for JPSS and GOES-R missions. Understanding issues in LST development and validation is vital in our efforts to improve the satellite LST production.

18 August 2015

Title: Convective-scale Warn-on-Forecast: Vision to Reality
Presenter(s): David J. Stensrud, The Pennsylvania State University
Date & Time: 18 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
David J. Stensrud, The Pennsylvania State University

Title:
Convective-scale Warn-on-Forecast: Vision to Reality Sponsor Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) seminar Point of Contact: Geoff Dimego geoff.dimego@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Go to meeting to be arranged Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/773404381 You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (312) 757-3121 Access Code: 773-404-381 Abstract. Warn-on-Forecast is a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration project to extend severe weather warning lead times by incorporating forecasts from a convection-allowing ensemble modeling system into the warning decision process. Initial results with convection-allowing ensembles that assimilate radar observations have shown that while reasonable thunderstorm analyses are produced, obtaining accurate very short-range thunderstorm forecasts is more challenging. Results from several warn-on-forecast data assimilation and prediction experiments and real-time testing in the 2015 NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed will be shown to highlight the potential benefits and to outline the challenges still ahead.
Title: Science, Industry, Management: Perception of Ocean Acidification and Fisheries in Georgia and Florida Virtual Panel
Presenter(s): Curtis Hemmel, Bay Shellfish Co, Holly Greening, Tampa Bay Estuary Program, Holly Greening, Tampa Bay Estuary Program, Brian Hopkinson, University of Georgia
Date & Time: 18 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: virtual attendance only; Register here:https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8406816796264790530
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Curtis Hemmel, Bay Shellfish Co, Holly Greening, Tampa Bay Estuary Program, Holly Greening, Tampa Bay Estuary Program, Brian Hopkinson, University of Georgia

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8406816796264790530

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Please join us for a discussion about ocean acidification and potential implications for fisheries in Georgia and Florida. Members of the shellfish industry, natural resource management, and ocean acidification and fisheries research fields will share their expertise and perspective during this virtual panel. Questions from the public will then be posed to our panelists and the panel will conclude with a discussion among panelists and those attending.

19 August 2015

Title: Resource Dependency and Compliance of Artisanal Fisheries in Nabq Protected Area, Gulf of Aqaba-Red Sea, Egypt
Presenter(s): Ayman Mabrouk, Ph.D., 2015 Sea Grant Fellow from Michigan State University, and Former Assistant Director for Nature Conservation at the Egyptian Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs
Date & Time: 19 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: ssmc4 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title:
Part 4 of a Five-Part Series on Marine Conservation and Management Red Sea: Resource Dependency and Compliance of Artisanal Fisheries in Nabq Protected Area, Gulf of Aqaba-Red Sea, Egypt

Presenter(s):
Ayman Mabrouk, Ph.D., 2015 Sea Grant Fellow from Michigan State University, and Former Assistant Director for Nature Conservation at the Egyptian Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Bio(s):
Ayman Mabrouk was born in Port Said, Egypt and graduated from the Suez Canal University in Ismailia Egypt in 1993 as a Marine Biologist. From 1995-2009, Ayman worked for the National Parks of Egypt, first as an environmental researcher and Manager of Nabq Protected Area, and then as a Manager of the South Sinai Protectorates, Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, Egypt. From 2009-2010 he was Assistant Director for the Nature Conservation Sector in Cairo, and mentor for the managers of marine protected areas of Egypt. Ayman was responsible for developing and implementing the strategic management plan for conserving the Egyptian Red Sea, and he assessed the performance of the MPAs there (178,360 mile²) in terms of conserving marine resources. In 2014 Ayman earned his Ph.D. in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University; his thesis was on “The role of marine protected areas in maintaining sustainable fisheries in the Egyptian Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea”. Currently Ayman is a Sea Grant Knauss fellow at the NOAA NCCOS Biogeography Branch.

Abstract:
Part 4: TBD

20 August 2015

Title: Evaluating the Transparency of Regional Fisheries Management Organizations
Presenter(s): Nichola Clark NOAA Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement
Date & Time: 20 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Nichola Clark, NOAA Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR NSG Seminar POC for questions: helen.cheng@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
For remote access via webinar for each of these seminars, please fill out the registration form at http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360. You must use the PHONE to call in for audio. BE SURE to install the correct plug-in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
The United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement recognizes regional fisheries management organizations and agreements (RFMOs) as institutions through which high seas fisheries might be effectively conserved and managed. Although the FAO recognizes over 50 RFMOs and these organizations cover much of the geographic extent of the world's oceans, declining fish stocks have not improved. According to scholars and environmental non-governmental organizations (NGOs), RFMOs are failing the high seas. Political theorists recognize transparency as a mechanism through which governance can be improved. Indeed, a number of environmental governance institutions, including those that relate specifically to RFMOs, have called for greater transparency, in hopes that the adoption of more transparent practices will help restore failing fish stocks. This lecture will explore how well RFMOs are meeting international expectations for transparency and if any organizations in particular stand out as having particularly transparent or not-transparent practices. Specific discussions will include an identification of elements of transparency upon which RFMOs can most improve and offer recommendations for how RFMOs can achieve better transparency practices..
Title: Doing More with Less: Ecosystem ServiceHhotspots in Massachusetts, USA
Presenter(s): Meghan Blumstein, PhD candidate, Harvard University
Date & Time: 20 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Meghan Blumstein, PhD candidate, Harvard University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed for web. About the Speaker &

Abstract:
Meghan is a PhD candidate at Harvard University in Andrew Richardson's lab, studying the resilience of forests to climate change. Prior to starting her graduate program, she held a two-year position with Jonathan Thompson at the Smithsonian/Harvard Forest. Her work there focused on projecting future scenarios of land use and forest growth and their impacts on ecosystem services. Her talk will focus on a portion of this project and considerations that should be taken when using hotspots to define conservation priorities. In Massachusetts, the number of ecosystem service hotspots has increased over time, but this may in fact be a negative reflection of expanding development and degrading forests over the past decade.
Title: A Severe Weather Quick OSSE to Examine the Impact of Super Constellations of GPS Radio Occultation Satellites
Presenter(s): Mark Leidner, Atmospheric and Environmental Research, AER
Date & Time: 20 August 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Center, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mark Leidner, Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER)

Sponsor(s):
Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) Point of Contact: Erin.Jones@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Video: 1. Go to JCSDA Seminar 2. Enter the event number: 999 299 037 3. Password is JCSDA 4. Click "Join Now". 5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Audio: USA participants: 1-866-715-2479, Code: 9457557, Intern'l: 1-517-345-5260

Abstract:
In our simulation study, we use the Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) framework to measure the impact of vastly increased numbers of GNSS RO profiles on weather analysis and forecasting. Our study focuses on severe convective weather in the State of Oklahoma, part of the so-called “tornado alley” because of the frequent bouts of severe weather it experiences each year. The case of interest is the May 31, 2013 “El Reno” tornado, because this event produced both an EF3 tornado and flash flooding in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to compute a 2 km nature run, i.e., the “truth” in our study. And we use a 24-member, physics-based ensemble of 18-km-resolution WRF models, along with an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) to blend the simulated observations with the ensemble mean a priori model state vector. We use the WRF-DART ensemble data assimilation system to manage the hourly, cycling data assimilation and for its non-local, excess phase observation operator for RO data. We simulate future constellations of RO satellites that can produce up to 2.5 million profiles/day globally. We will show analysis and forecast impacts of greatly increased numbers of RO profiles. The analysis impacts on lower tropospheric moisture fields in particular will be highlighted, as well as impacts on convective initiation in the forecasts.
Title: Science-to-management feedback loops support coral-reef conservation efforts across Micronesia
Presenter(s): Dr. Peter Houk, University of Guam Marine Laboratory
Date & Time: 20 August 2015
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - See event description
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Peter Houk (University of Guam Marine Laboratory) Seminar POC: alicia.clarke@noaa.gov Sponsored by NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (www.coralreef.noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
WebEx conferencing information: Meeting Number: 441497235; Meeting Passcode: OCRMCCD 1. To join the meeting: http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?sigKey=mymeetings&i=441497235&p=OCRMCCD&t=c 2. Enter the required fields. 3. Indicate that you have read the Privacy Policy. 4. Click on Proceed. To access the sound you must dial in using the following number (it is not through the web). Dial: (866) 581-0524; Passcode: 6578691#

Abstract:
Fishing and pollution represent chronic stressors on coral reefs that can prolong disturbance-and-recovery cycles, and contribute to ecosystem decline through time. Climate change serves to exacerbate this situation by increasing the frequency of disturbance events, and shorten the time available for recovery cycles. While island nations have little control over carbon emissions, they can manage localized stressors to ensure ecosystem services from coral reefs persist through time. In this spirit, the political leaders of 6 nations in Micronesia challenged each other to conserve at least 30% of marine resources, and 20% of terrestrial resources, by 2020. This talk will present the first assessment of the conservation movement by summarizing initial findings from a growing, standardized coral monitoring program. In compliment, the utility of these findings for stakeholders will be presented through three case studies. Finally, these collective efforts have served to focus attention on coral-reef fisheries as a primary localized stressor impacting reef condition across Micronesia. Therefore, projects originating from supplemental support from the Packard and Cargill Foundations to address nearshore fisheries will also be summarized, which have become integrated within our growing science-to-management network.

21 August 2015

Title: Numerical Weather Prediction in the Next Decade - Convective Forecasts with a Global Atmospheric Model?
Presenter(s): Bill Skamarock, National Center for Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 21 August 2015
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Bill Skamarock, National Center for Atmospheric Research POC: Andrew Ostapenko

Remote Access:
For last few seminars, the line was full and many people could not connect GTM. If you are planning to use remote access, please reserve line by E-mail to Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov by Thrsday 8/20 noon. Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/869621693 United States : +1 (626) 425-3113 Access Code: 869-621-693

Abstract:
Convection permitting NWP uses regional models and short forecasts periods because of computational constraints and the inherent limitations of downscaling global forecasts. Using global models that permit local refinement, existing computers are capable of producing CONUS-scale explicit convective forecasts over intermediate-range periods within operational time windows. The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) uses an unstructured spherical centroidal Voronoi mesh that allows for smooth cell-size variations between coarse and fine resolution regions on the mesh, and we been using it to produce experimental convective-scale global model forecasts. We will present MPAS forecast results from the May 2015 NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed forecast experiment, and MPAS forecasts supporting the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment, that demonstrate these MPAS capabilities. Two issues are addressed with the MPAS configuration in these forecast experiments. First, forecast results show that the problems inherent in traditional grid-nesting approaches are not evident in the MPAS variable-mesh forecasts. Second, we are using the scale-aware version of the Grell-Freitas convective parameterization, and we find that it transitions appropriately from parameterizing essential all the unstable deep convection at hydrostatic-scale mesh spacings to allowing the convection to be explicitly simulated at nonhydrostatic mesh spacings on the variable resolution mesh. We will discuss our experience with these issues within the context of these and other forecast tests.
Title: Exploring Sea Grant's Coastal Resilience Toolkit
Presenter(s): Dr. Katherine Bunting-Howarth, New York Sea Grant and Helen Cheng, National Sea Grant Office
Date & Time: 21 August 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Katherine Bunting-Howarth, JD, PhD, Associate Director at New York Sea Grant and Assistant Director at Cornell Cooperative Extension, and Helen Cheng, Coastal Communities Specialist at National Sea Grant Office

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) National Sea Grant College Program

Remote Access:
FOR WEBCAST: go to https://connect.extension.iastate.edu/eden at the webinar date and time. Enter as a guest.

Abstract:
Learn about tools available to Great Lakes and marine coastal communities faced with coastal storms, climate change, sea level rise, tsunamis, and hurricanes. These tools have been tried and tested by Sea Grant Extension professionals. Participate in this webinar and see whether one of these tools can be used for your coastal constituency. Point of Contact: robin.garcia@noaa.gov (301-734-1181)

24 August 2015

Title: Data Assimilation toward Big Data and Post-peta-scale Supercomputing: A Personal Perspective
Presenter(s): Takemasa Miyoshi, RIKEN
Date & Time: 24 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar Speaker Takemasa Miyoshi, RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science. Kobe, Japan

Title:
Data Assimilation toward Big Data and Post-peta-scale Supercomputing: A Personal Perspective POC Michiko Masutani (michiko.masutani@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/438143429 You can also dial in using your phone. United States +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 438-143-429 For last few seminars, the line was full and many people could not connect GTM. If you are planning to use remote access, please reserve line by respond as"yes" to the invitation or E-mail to Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov. We will ensure that you will not be dismissed from GTM.

Abstract:
I will present my personal perspective on the next 10-20 years of data assimilation with the future-generation sensors and post-peta-scale supercomputers, based on our own experience with the 10-petaflops “K computer”. New sensors produce orders of magnitude more data than the current sensors, and faster computers enable orders of magnitude more precise simulations, or “Big Simulations”. Data assimilation deals with the “Big Data” from both new sensors and Big Simulations. We started a “Big Data Assimilation” project, aiming to develop a revolutionary weather forecasting system to refresh 30-minute forecasts at a 100-m resolution every 30 seconds, 120 times more rapid than the typical hourly-updated systems. We also investigated ensemble data assimilation using 10240 ensemble members, largest ever for the global atmosphere. Based on the experience using the K computer, we will discuss the future of data assimilation in the forthcoming Big Data and Big Simulation era. Keywords: big data, large ensemble, big simulation, post-peta-scale supercomputing

25 August 2015

Title: Automating Habitat Mapping in a Complex World of Corals and Coastal Waters
Presenter(s): Gustav Kågesten, NOAA/NCCOS Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 25 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOSS SSMC4, Rm 8150, 1305 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Gustav Kågesten, NOAA/NCCOS Biogeography Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code needed for web.

Abstract:
We created a detailed seafloor map of coral reef habitats in the Caribbean off NE Puerto Rico, using satellite imagery, bathymetry data, ground validation video, and a suite of spatial predictors. This project builds on a semi-automated mapping process by NOAA's NCCOS Biogeography Branch and introduces tools to map large areas of complex marine habitats. The new habitat map is being used in a spatial prioritization project for the Northeast Reserves, supporting development of an improved management plan, which is also a new NOAA Habitat Focus Area.

Bio(s):
Gustav works at NOAA's Biogeography Branch to map and monitor temperate and tropical marine ecosystems. After four years at NOAA he is moving back home to Sweden to keep working on Marine Spatial Planning for the Swedish Government.
Title: Science, Industry, Management: Perception of Ocean Acidification and Fisheries in the Carolinas Virtual Panel
Presenter(s): Erik Smith of North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Mel Bell of South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, James Morris of NOAA Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Bob Rhealt, East Coast Shellfish Growers Association,
Date & Time: 25 August 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: virtual attendance only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Bob Rhealt of the East Coast Shellfish Growers Association will offer an industry perspective, Mel Bell of South Carolina Department of Natural Resources will offer the management perspective, Erik Smith of North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve will share hisacidification scientific expertise, and James Morris of NOAA Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research will offer his expertise in fisheries science.

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2523531286702607873

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Please join us for a discussion about ocean acidification and potential implications for fisheries in the Carolinas. Members of the shellfish industry, natural resource management, and ocean acidification and fisheries research fields will share their expertise and perspective during this virtual panel. Questions from the public will then be posed to our panelists and the panel will conclude with a discussion among panelists and those attending.

26 August 2015

Title: Long Island Sound: Addressing Eutrophication of the Urban Sea
Presenter(s): Mark Tedesco, EPA, Director of Long Island Sound Study
Date & Time: 26 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mark Tedesco, EPA, Director of Long Island Sound Study

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed.

Abstract:
Long Island Sound is truly an urban estuary, with a long history of human influence and a watershed population of nine million people. Anthropogenic influences have degraded water quality and reduced natural terrestrial habitat size and complexity. Over the past 15 years, management efforts coordinated through the Long Island Sound Study have resulted in significant progress toward mitigating nitrogen impairments in Long Island Sound. Guided by a Total Maximum Daily Load to Achieve Water Quality Standards for Dissolved Oxygen in Long Island Sound (LIS TMDL), established in 2000, upgrades to 106 wastewater treatment facilities in Connecticut and New York wastewater treatment facilities have decreased nitrogen discharged by 40 million pounds per year, attaining 94% of the TMDL wasteload allocation. Continued Clean Air Act controls have reduced atmospheric deposition in the watershed by an average of 25% for total nitrogen and 50% for nitrate. Reductions in agricultural activity in the watershed and improved management have reduced fertilizer applications by 25% and livestock numbers by 40%. The waters of Long Island Sound and its tributaries are responding to these nitrogen load reductions. Flow-normalized nutrient concentrations and fluxes from tributaries draining to Long Island have decreased from 1974 to 2013 and from 2001 to 2013, and nitrogen concentrations in LIS have decreased as well. Over the past decade the severity of hypoxia (or low dissolved oxygen levels) in LIS appears to be lessening. And eelgrass beds, a rooted underwater plant sensitive to water quality conditions, have increased in extent by 4.5% between 2009 and 2012 and 29% between 2002 and 2012. Despite the positive trends in these Pressure and State indicators, modeling and monitoring suggest that further reductions in nitrogen below the 2000 LIS TMDL allocations will be needed to attain water quality standards. The presentation will review progress made in reducing eutrophication in LIS and identify some of the challenges and issues that need to be addressed to further advance restoration. Forward, including further management of sources of nitrogen and habitat approaches to increase the assimilative capacity of LIS.

Bio(s):
Mark Tedesco is director of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Long Island Sound Office. The office coordinates the Long Island Sound Study, administered by EPA as part of the National Estuary Program under the Clean Water Act. Mr. Tedesco is responsible for supporting implementation of a Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan for Long Island Sound, approved by the Governors of New York and Connecticut and the EPA Administrator, in cooperation with federal, state, and local government, private organizations, and the public. Mr. Tedesco has worked for EPA for 28 years. He received his M.S. in marine environmental science in 1986 and a B.S in biology in 1982 from Stony Brook University.
Title: Shrimper Attitudes and Bycatch Compliance in the Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Fishery
Presenter(s): Dr. Jolvan T. Morris, Post-doctoral Research Fellow, NOAA Living Marine Cooperative Science Center at Savannah State University
Date & Time: 26 August 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jolvan T. Morris, Post-doctoral Research Fellow, NOAA Living Marine Cooperative Science Center at Savannah State University Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library. Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301‐713‐2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301‐713‐2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866‐833‐7307, participant code is 8986360# . Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Bycatch reduction technology (BRT) is a popular way to protect endangered and threatened marine animals. The available literature on BRT primarily considers the biological elements of managing shrimp trawl fisheries but rarely addresses social acceptance of such protocols, despite the clear importance of human behavior to successful deployment of BRTs. Reasons why fishermen adopt or fail to comply with requirements for BRT, thus, are poorly understood. The Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery, and its requirements for Turtle Excluder Devices (TEDs) to protect Gulf of Mexico sea turtle species, sharks, and marine mammals, offers a useful case study on BRT compliance. Research methods included a content analysis of shrimping regulation literature, and focused interviews and mail surveys that were administered to shrimp fishermen across three states in the Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery: Texas, Louisiana and Florida. Results suggest that regardless of general environmental attitudes, the cost of buying TEDs and the revenue lost through lower catches tend to deter TED use, while increased knowledge regarding regulatory requirements, species endangerment status, and bycatch levels has no impact. Also improving compliance were increased participation in decision making in advance of deployment and certain social norms. Recommendations at the conclusion of this research outline how to include fishermen in decision-making for TED deployment, what management practices may promote compliance, and how to consider Environmental Justice and sustainability concerns while managing the Gulf of Mexico Shrimp fishery

Bio(s):
Dr. Jolvan Morris is a postdoctoral researcher working with Dr. Dionne Hoskins in the NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center at Savannah State University (SSU). Her principal research interests are Environmental Policy, Risk Communication, the Social Dimensions of Fisheries, and Environmental Justice issues in coastal communities. Dr. Morris's post-doctoral research focuses on the African American Fishermen Oral History Project at SSU. This initiative explores the roles and significance of fisheries in Gullah Geechee communities along the coast in the Southeastern United States. She earned her Master's degree and Ph.D. in Environmental Science from Florida A&M University in the NOAA Environmental Cooperative Science Center. Her Master's thesis focused on evaluating the biological and sociological issues surrounding the management of protected sturgeon species under Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act. Her dissertation research used socio-environmental synthesis to address compliance, participation, and environmental justice issues in the Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery. Dr. Morris also spent two years as an intern at the Northeast Regional Office of the National Marine Fisheries Service assisting the Protected Resources Division with projects including Section 7 consultations, identifying critical habitat for protected marine species, and the development of educational outreach programs for K-12 students.

2 September 2015

Title: Sensitivity Patterns of Atlantic Meridional Overturning; 20th Century Variability of Atmospheric Circulation
Presenter(s): Martha Buckley, George Mason University and Brian Soden, University of Miami
Date & Time: 2 September 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Martha Buckley, George Mason University and Brian Soden, University of Miami

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Climate Program Office (OAR/CPO) - Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5061848436737591042 You must register in advance, at which point you will receive webinar access information.

Abstract:
Pending. For project summary visit http://go.usa.gov/3sH8G Point of Contact: hunter.jones@noaa.gov (301-734-1215) For more information on the series, and to see the complete schedule, visit http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars ===ABSTRACTS=== Martha Buckley - Low-frequency SST and upper-ocean heat content variability in the North Atlantic Observations indicate that Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) exhibit significant low-frequency variability. The goal of this work is to quantify the relative roles of atmo- spheric forcing and ocean dynamics in creating SST/upper-ocean heat content anomalies in the North Atlantic. For this purpose, I utilize a state estimate (covering the period 1992 to 2010) produced by Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) to quantify the upper ocean heat budget in the North Atlantic on monthly to interan- nual timescales. Three novel techniques are introduced: (1) the heat budget is integrated over the maximum climatological mixed layer depth (integral denoted as H), which gives results that are relevant for explaining SST while avoiding strong contributions from ver- tical diffusion and entrainment; (2) advective convergences are separated into Ekman and geostrophic parts, a technique that is successful away from ocean boundaries; (3) air-sea heat fluxes and heat transport convergences due to anomalous Ekman advection are com- bined into one local forcing term. The central results of the analysis are as follows: (1) In the interior of subtropical gyre, local forcing explains the majority of H variance on all timescales resolved by the ECCO estimate. (2) In the Gulf Stream region, low-frequency H anomalies are forced by geostrophic convergences and damped by air-sea heat fluxes. (3) In the interior of the subpolar gyre, diffusion and bolus transports play a leading order role in H variability, and these transports are correlated with low-frequency variability in wintertime mixed layer depths.
Title: Advancing Ecosystem-Based Management: Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management Policy and Roadmap
Presenter(s): Jason Link, PhD, Senior Scientist for Ecosystem Management at NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 2 September 2015
3:15 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA SSMC3, Room 12836, 1315 East West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jason Link, PhD, Senior Scientist for Ecosystem Management at NOAA Fisheries Seminar

Sponsor(s):
EBM Seminar Series, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Mgmt and Budget Seminar POC: adam.fullerton@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Audio Dial in: 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 994 973 904 https://noaaevents2.webex.com/noaaevents2/onstage/g.php?d=994973904&t=a Event Password: ecofish

Abstract:
NOAA has adopted ecosystem-based management (EBM) as the approach for meeting the agency's mandates to sustainably manage the nation's marine resources. EBM accounts for a changing marine climate and is guided by an adaptive management approach. NOAA Fisheries is advancing EBM for the fisheries sector through development of an Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management (EBFM) Policy Statement and associated Roadmap. This presentation will provide an overview and update of the draft EBFM Policy Statement and Roadmap, how they relate to other efforts, and discuss how we'll know when we're doing EBFM.
Title: Channel Islands National Park and Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary NGSS and Common Core Aligned Middle School Ocean Acidification Curriculum
Presenter(s): Sarah Raskin & Doug DuBois, Oxnard Unified School District
Date & Time: 2 September 2015
6:30 pm - 7:30 pm ET
Location: Online attendance only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1263495359764788738
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Raskin and Doug DuBois of the Oxnard Unified School District

Sponsor(s):
Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources for Communicators and Educators (SOARCE) Seminar Series. This series is jointly sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program.

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1263495359764788738

Abstract:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1263495359764788738

Bio(s):
Sarah Raskin is a science teacher at the Haydock Academy of Arts and Sciences in Oxnard, California. She is currently working as a magnet schools grant coordinator at her school site to help facilitate Haydock's transition to an arts and sciences academy with an emphasis on environmental science. Sarah seeks to find ways to connect her students to their local environment through science education. Sarah has been teaching for over eleven years, in both Oxnard and Santa Cruz, California (Meg Chadsey, Ocean Acidification Specialist, Washington State Sea Grant) Doug Dubois earned his undergraduate degree at the University of California Santa Barbara in environmental studies. Besides his teaching credential, Doug DuBois is a bilingual credentialed educator. He participated in a UCLA program for science teachers called Leadership in Marine Science. In this UCLA program he learned how to integrate ocean sciences into the classroom. Doug has written numerous grants that relate to science and environmental education. He is currently helping Robert J. Frank Middle school transform into the Robert J Frank Academy of Marine Science and Engineering as the MSAP Site Coordinator.

3 September 2015

Title: Modeling Two-Way Land/Atmosphere/Ocean Interaction
Presenter(s): Yongkang Xue, UCLA
Date & Time: 3 September 2015
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP), Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars Sponsor CPC- EMC seminar;

Presenter(s):
Yongkang Xue, UCLA

Abstract:
For the past four decades, Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) has been one of the most extensively studied phenomena in atmospheric and climatic sciences. While numerous features of MJO have been revealed through analyzing observational and/or modeling data, a relatively complete theory based on fundamental dynamics of atmosphere and ocean that can explain systematically most of the observed features of MJO appears still to be out of reach. Many fundamental questions regarding MJO still need to be answered, such as why variability on intraseasonal stands out and why MJO propagates eastward. In this talk, the circulations driven by convective heating of different vertical structures are discussed through exploring the fundamental dynamical processes of tropical atmosphere. Special emphasis is placed on the low-level mass (moisture) convergence associated with the forced circulation and the maintenance of the shallow and deep heat sources. A new mechanism is inferred from the fundamental dynamics for the interaction between the large-scale convection and large-scale circulation. The new mechanism states that shallow heating drives a strong low-level moisture convergence so that the system of shallow heating and the forced large-scale circulation is unstable. When the unstable system reaches a certain amplitude, the stable cap layer immediately above the shallow heating erodes, and deep convection arises, which consumes most of the converged moisture at low levels without much feedback to the low-level convergence of moisture. The whole heating circulation system develops and dies; the estimated lifetime of such a system, based on the timescale of adjustment of tropical atmosphere to forcing, is on an intraseasonal timescale. Other observational features of MJO that can be explained by this theory are also discussed. Our study infers that a key to understanding intraseasonal oscillation is the shallow convective heating, but not OLR or velocity potential of upper levels.

10 September 2015

Title: Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Experimental Week 3-4 Temperature and Precipitation Outlooks
Presenter(s): Jon Gottschalck, National Weather Service/Climate Prediction Center
Date & Time: 10 September 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: This Webinar will be available only via remote access (see below, Remote Access)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jon Gottschalck (NWS Climate Prediction Center) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
National Weather Service, Climate Services Branch Seminar POC: Judy.Koepsell@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8412789344086141186 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar that should only be used by you.

Abstract:
The status of the ongoing effort at the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) for the development and release of experimental Week 3-4 temperature and precipitation outlooks will be described. Material presented will include the format and launch schedule of the experimental product, the scientific basis for outlooks of this type, description of the development process, review of forecast tool historical skill evaluation and the challenges moving forward.

Bio(s):
Mr. Jon Gottschalck currently works at the Climate Prediction Center (CPC), since 2004, within NOAA's National Weather Service. He was recently named Chief of the Operational Prediction Branch within CPC and is now responsible for outlining the overall direction of operational forecast related activities. Prior to this, Mr. Gottschalck served as CPC's Head of Forecast Operations where he was responsible for overseeing day-to-day routine production and dissemination of CPC's operational forecast products. Mr. Gottschalck earned both a B.S. and M.S. degree in meteorology from the Pennsylvania State University in 1994 and 1996, respectively. Recording Availability: The recording should be available at the following location about 1 week after the presentation: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/csd/index.php?section=seminar
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 10 September 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.

15 September 2015

Title: Deciphering the effects of ocean acidification on microbial assemblage structure and community function
Presenter(s): Astrid Schnetzer, Associate Professor, North Carolina State University
Date & Time: 15 September 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual attendance only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3265165074424778241
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Astrid Schnetzer, North Carolina State University

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3265165074424778241

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Progressing ocean acidification may significantly impact marine plankton community structure and community-level processes. Yet, our ability to predict specific responses is highly limited due to the taxonomic complexity of microbial assemblages and the limitations of the methodological and experimental tools presently available to test specific hypotheses. Research focusing on single microbes (typically well-studied cultured species) has begun to reveal important mechanistic insight into the potential effects of a changing CO2 regime. Much less, however, is known about how mixed (natural) assemblages may respond to ocean acidification. A central question is if the trends and patterns that are observed in microbial communities during short-term manipulations can be extrapolated to the responses of fully acclimated plankton communities over decadal or longer timescales. Further challenges arise from linking shifts in microbial assemblage structure to shifts in biogeochemistry at the base of the food web in response to changed global climate parameters (i.e. pCO2 and temperature). State-of-the-art molecular approaches allow researchers to tackle these challenges across an array of marine systems. These novel approaches will help us understand the impacts of OA on microbial communities in the SAB.
Title: Development and Testing of the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) Model for the Hurricane Storm Surge Operational Forecast System
Presenter(s): Taylor Ashe, Ocean Engineer at AECOM and James Halgren, Water Resources Engineer with Riverside Technology, Inc.
Date & Time: 15 September 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Taylor Asher, Ocean Engineer at AECOM and James Halgren, Water Resources Engineer with Riverside Technology, Inc.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series and NOS Coast Survey Development Laboratory (CSDL); points of contact: jesse.feyen@noaa.gov or tracy.gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed.

Abstract:
Coast Survey Development Laboratory (CSDL) is developing a tropical cyclone storm surge and tide model called the Hurricane Storm Surge Operational Forecast System (HSSOFS) to provide ensemble coastal flood guidance on National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) high performance computers. A team from Riverside Technology, inc. and AECOM has developed a 1.8M node ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) hydrodynamic model of the East Coast and Gulf of Mexico for the HSSOFS. This talk will cover mesh and modeldevelopment, validation, application of ensemble-based meteorological forcing, and interaction with river models.

Presenter(s):
Taylor Asher (Ocean Engineer at AECOM) earned B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Rhode Island, and has specialized for 5 years with AECOM in the fields of hydrodynamics, numerical modeling, statistics, and data analysis, and Taylor provided his ADCIRC modeling expertise for this study. James Halgren (Water Resources Engineer with Riverside Technology, Inc.,) studied Civil Engineering at Brigham Young and Colorado State Universities, and now provides technical leadership at Riverside on projects involving various aspects of distributed modeling and operational forecast implementation.

16 September 2015

Title: Evaluation of the Use of the No Take Zones (NTZs) for Fisheries Sustainability in Nabq Protected Area, Gulf of Aqaba-Red Sea, Egypt; Part 5 in a 6-Part series
Presenter(s): Ayman Mabrouk, Ph.D., 2015 Sea Grant Fellow
Date & Time: 16 September 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ayman Mabrouk, Ph.D., 2015 Sea Grant Fellow from Michigan State University, and Former Assistant Director for Nature Conservation at the Egyptian Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Bio(s):
Ayman Mabrouk was born in Port Said, Egypt and graduated from the Suez Canal University in Ismailia Egypt in 1993 as a Marine Biologist. From 1995-2009, Ayman worked for the National Parks of Egypt, first as an environmental researcher and Manager of Nabq Protected Area, and then as a Manager of the South Sinai Protectorates, Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, Egypt. From 2009-2010 he was Assistant Director for the Nature Conservation Sector in Cairo, and mentor for the managers of marine protected areas of Egypt. Ayman was responsible for developing and implementing the strategic management plan for conserving the Egyptian Red Sea, and he assessed the performance of the MPAs there (178,360 mile²) in terms of conserving marine resources. In 2014 Ayman earned his Ph.D. in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University; his thesis was on “The role of marine protected areas in maintaining sustainable fisheries in the Egyptian Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea”. Currently Ayman is a Sea Grant Knauss fellow at the NOAA NCCOS Biogeography Branch.

Abstract:
Part 5: TBD
Title: Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Impact on Climate Regimes; West African Monsoons & Atlantic Hurricanes
Presenter(s): Young-Oh Kwon, WHOI and Claude Frankignoul, WHOI and Gokhan Danabasoglu, NCAR and Elinor Martin, Oklahoma University and Christopher D. Thorncroft, SUNY - Albany
Date & Time: 16 September 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - OAR CPO Fishbowl - Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Young-Oh Kwon, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Elinor Martin, Oklahoma University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Climate Program Office (OAR/CPO) - Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5930664932820164610 You must register in advance, at which point you will receive webinar access information.

Abstract:
Pending.For project summary visit http://go.usa.gov/3sH8G Point of Contact: hunter.jones@noaa.gov (301-734-1215) For more information on the series, and to see the complete schedule, visit http://cpo.noaa.gov/cvp-webinars

Abstract:
Feedback between the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) multidecadal variability and atmospheric circulation is investigated in a 1300 year-long pre-industrial control simulation of the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) primarily using the lagged maximum covariance analysis (MCA). The feedback is strongest in winter. Positive phase of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is found to precede an AMOC intensification by a few years, while the negative NAO-like atmospheric circulation anomalies appear following the AMOC intensification by ~7 years. The negative NAO-like atmospheric response is driven by a meridional SST dipole with warming in the subpolar gyre and cooling near the Gulf Stream (GS)-North Atlantic Current (NAC). The meridional SST dipole alters the low-level baroclinicity near the storm track by shifting the maximum eddy growth southward. The SST anomalies originate from an intensification of the subpolar gyre circulation and subsequent interaction between the enhanced equatorward deep currents and the GS-NAC near the Tail of Grand Banks and the western flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. A zonal SST dipole caused by the GS-NAC path shifts in the opposite directions subsequently becomes a meridional SST dipole as the downstream warm anomalies advect cyclonically in the subpolar gyre.

17 September 2015

Title: Evaluating Offshore Wind Energy Feasibility off the California Central Coast
Presenter(s): Luke Feinberg, Department of Energy - Wind and Water Power Technologies Office
Date & Time: 17 September 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Luke Feinberg, Department of Energy - Wind and Water Power Technologies Office, Lucas.Feinberg@EE.DOE.gov

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series and NOAA Central Library. Contacts: Wessley.Merten@noaa.gov or Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301‐713‐2600 ext. 140)

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866‐833‐7307, participant code is 8986360# . Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
If offshore wind (OSW) is to contribute to California's renewable energy goals, government agencies, developers, and the public must first understand the industry's feasibility in all coastal regions. Out of mutual interest in locally reducing fossil fuel use and expanding renewable energy production, the clients proposed this project to explore the potential of OSW off San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Ventura Counties (the region of interest, or ROI). The ‘CalWind' team has spent the last year working toward this objective. The breadth of topics associated with wind energy development in California's marine environment is substantial, and performing robust studies of all OSW feasibility variables was beyond the scope of a one-year project. Therefore, CalWind focused on three facets of feasibility: 1) Stakeholder perceptions 2) Spatial analysis of wind resources and conflicting uses 3) Permitting pathways Interviews and a public survey identified key stakeholders and show that the majority of survey respondents are supportive of OSW. However, concerns arise around possible viewshed and avian impacts. Next, commercially exploitable wind resources exist in the ROI, but spatial analyses indicate that conflicts will likely occur between OSW development and current uses of the marine environment. Lastly, the permitting process for OSW is complex and untested. The team mapped this process and concludes that regulatory synergies could be enhanced through inter-agency cooperation. Limiting consideration to the factors analyzed in this project, OSW development in the ROI is theoretically feasible, but significant development barriers currently restrict industry advancement. Highlights: Based on the parameters examined in this project, OSW development is feasible off California's central coast; however, development barriers exist: 1. Some stakeholders oppose OSW development. Concerns expressed by stakeholders include impacts to marine life and viewsheds. 2. State and federal permitting paths lack integration and need coordinated effort. 3. Environmental baseline data are incomplete and/or outdated. Our research indicates that these barriers may be overcome: 1. Survey respondents indicate support and increased willingness to pay for OSW. Environmental and viewshed impacts should be considered in site selection studies. 2. Effective methods of streamlining the regulatory process exist on the East Coast and could be implemented in the ROI. 3. Once better baseline data are gathered, a framework exists for identifying areas of least conflict for OSW.

Bio(s):
Luke is currently a Knauss fellow at the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office in the Department of Energy where he serves as a Marine Renewable Energy Environmental Science and Policy Specialist. He is working on projects and issues related to accelerating deployment and decreasing market barriers for offshore wind energy. Specifically he is assisting with management of three offshore wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects; helping manage an offshore wind environmental research portfolio; representing the DOE on the National Ocean Councils New England, Mid-Atlantic, Great Lakes, and West Coast Regional Planning bodies; and is the lead author on an International Energy Agency (IEA) white paper. Luke received a degree from Bates College in 2007, majoring in Biology. He spent the next 4 and half years working as environmental consultant in Boston, Massachusetts assisting in environmental emergency response to managing environmental remediation projects for energy infrastructure development. In 2012, he and his wife moved to Santa Barbara, California and enrolled at the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. In 2014 he received a Masters of Environmental Science and Management focusing on Energy and Climate and Corporate Environmental Management. Luke has always been driven by his foundation as a tall ship sailor and joys time by the ocean and exploring new places. In his free time, Luke enjoys spending time with his wife and dog outdoors, training for triathlons, and cooking.
Title: Forecasts Evaluation: Statistical Techniques for Decision Support
Presenter(s): Elizabeth Weatherhead, University of Colorado
Date & Time: 17 September 2015
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA science seminar Sponsor EMC sminar

Title:
Forecasts Evaluation: Statistical Techniques for Decision Support

Presenter(s):
Elizabeth Weatherhead (University of Colorado) POC MIke Ek Remote Access by GoTo meeting Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/754309661 You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (872) 240-3212 Access Code: 754-309-661

Abstract:
Changes in models, observations or even computing approaches are all likely to result in changes to forecasts. When the forecast change is small, identifying if it is an improvement can be challenging and expensive. Decision support statistics can help identify even very small improvements. By making use of paired forecasts, and respecting the day-to-day and even hour-to-hour autocorrelation in weather, forecasts and forecast errors, identification can be made more efficiently and with higher likelihood of long-term success. Perhaps just as importantly, statistical input can help design evaluation runs to minimize cost while maximizing the power of the results. For instance, the number of runs can be reduced significantly, if forecasting evaluation techniques are determined in advance. These decision support techniques can be used to determine if an added set of observations is significant, whether a computer change is systematically more harmful, or the impact of even small changes to physics packages or model cores. Techniques will be reviewed and sample results shared.

18 September 2015

Title: The Atlantic Hurricane Database Reanalysis Project
Presenter(s): Christopher W. Landsea, NOAA/NWS/NCEP/National Hurricane Center
Date & Time: 18 September 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Christopher W. Landsea, NOAA/NWS/NCEP/National Hurricane Center Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library. Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301‐713‐2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301‐713‐2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866‐833‐7307, participant code is 8986360# . Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
A re-analysis of the Atlantic basin tropical storm and hurricane database (HURDAT2, otherwise known as "best tracks") for the period of 1851 to 1955 has been completed with the remainder of the 20th Century still ongoing. This reworking and extension back in time of the main archive for tropical cyclones of the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico was necessary to correct systematic and random errors and biases in the data as well as to incorporate observations that may not have been available at the time. The re-analysis project provides the revised tropical storm and hurricane database, a metadata file detailing individual changes for each tropical cyclone, a "center fix" file of raw tropical cyclone observations, details for U.S. landfalling tropical storms and hurricanes, and comments from/replies to the Best Track Change Committee. This presentation details the methodologies used for this re-analysis of the Atlantic tropical cyclone record as well as some of the highlights of the most important changes made.

Bio(s):
Christopher W. Landsea is the Science and Operations Officer at NOAA's National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami. In addition to forecasting and training duties, he is responsible for administration and evaluation of Joint Hurricane Testbed projects which may be implemented operationally to assist in the monitoring and forecasting of hurricanes. Dr. Landsea received his Bachelor's Degree in Atmospheric Science from the University of California Los Angeles (1987) and his Master's Degree and Doctorate in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University (1991, 1994). His graduate work was undertaken with Dr. Bill Gray, one of the world's leading experts on hurricanes and tropical meteorology. Dr. Landsea's main expertise is in seasonal forecasting of hurricanes, in hurricane climate variability and change, and in testing applied research projects for possible use in weather forecasting. He currently is leading up a re-analysis of the Atlantic hurricane database. 1992's Hurricane Andrew was officially upgraded to a Category 5 hurricane at landfall in southeastern Florida as part of this project. In 2000, Dr. Landsea was a co-recipient of a U.S.Department of Commerce Bronze Medal "for issuing the accurate and first official physically based Atlantic seasonal hurricane outlooks for the 1998/1999 seasons, based upon new research." In 2002, Dr. Landsea was given the AMS' Editor's Award for reviews for the journal Weather and Forecasting. In 2009, he was the co-recipient of the 2009 National Hurricane Conference's Outstanding Achievement Award for Meteorology for development of the Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook product at the National Hurricane Center. In 2011, he was co-recipient of a Department of Commerce Gold Medal “for excellence in research and data stewardship leading to a more confident assessment of the influence of human-induced climate change on hurricanes”. He currently serves on the Editorial Board of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society as its subject matter editor in tropical meteorology

22 September 2015

Title: State of the Tropics: Unique ecosystems, rapid growth and a new global dynamic
Presenter(s): Professor Sandra Harding, Vice Chancellor and President of James Cook University
Date & Time: 22 September 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, 2nd floor, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Professor Sandra Harding, Vice Chancellor and President of James Cook University, Australia Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library. Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301‐713‐2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301‐713‐2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866‐833‐7307, participant code is 8986360# . Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Over the past half-century the Tropics has emerged as an increasingly important region. More than 40% of the world's population live in the Tropics, the region's economy is growing 20% faster than the rest of the world, it hosts around 80% of the world's biological diversity and it includes some of the world's most culturally diverse regions. Rapid population and economic growth mean it is a region whose influence is set to rise dramatically in coming decades. The nature of this influence will depend on how the region addresses its many challenges, and whether it realises its potential and opportunities. The range and significance of shared issues facing nations and territories in the Tropics suggests it is timely to examine the characteristics and challenges facing the tropical region as an entity in itself. State of the Tropics is a multi-disciplinary project that has brought together key research institutions across the Tropics to answer a nominally simple question: "Is life in the Tropics improving?" Recognizing shared connections and issues, while acknowledging variable responses between regions, we report that across a broad range of environmental, social and economic indicators, the region has made extraordinary progress in recent decades. Life is indeed improving on several fronts. However, the region is at a critical juncture. The resources required to sustain larger populations and economic growth are putting significant and increasing pressures on the natural environment. This presentation will explore some of the critical issues facing the Tropics and how we might work towards a prosperous and sustainable future for the Tropics worldwide.

Bio(s):
Professor Sandra Harding took up her appointment as Vice Chancellor and President of James Cook University Australia in January 2007. In this role, she is responsible for ensuring clear and effective leadership and management of the University across all operating sites, including campuses in Cairns, Singapore and Townsville. Professor Harding has extensive academic and academic leadership experience. An economic sociologist by training, her areas of enduring academic interest include work, organization and markets and how they work. She also has a keen interest in public policy in two areas: education policy and related areas; and the global Tropics, northern Australia and economic development. Professor Harding has undertaken a wide variety of external roles within the business community and the higher education sector. Current roles include: Councillor, Queensland Futures Institute; Member, Trade and Investment Policy Advisory Committee (advising Minister Andrew Robb, Minister for Trade and Investment); Member, the Australia-China Council Board; Co-Vice Chair, the New Colombo Plan Reference Group; Director, Regional Australia Institute; Council Member, the Australian Institute of Marine Science; Director, North Queensland Cowboys National Rugby League club; Director of Townsville Enterprise and of Advance Cairns (regional economic development bodies); and; a Governor of the Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA). She has recently been appointed a member of the Australian Government's Research Policy and Funding Working Group (assisting Dr Ian Watt AO).

23 September 2015

Title: CANCELLED: Coastal inundation modelling in New Zealand
Presenter(s): Dr. Scott Stephens, Oceanographer, New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research
Date & Time: 23 September 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, East-West Highway, 2nd floor, Silver Spring, MD, United States
Description:

CANCELLED OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Scott Stephens, Oceanographer, New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library. Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301‐713‐2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301‐713‐2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866‐833‐7307, participant code is 8986360# . Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
New Zealand's low-lying coastal areas are vulnerable to coastal-storm inundation, flooding by seawater, that can cause significant damage to property and infrastructure. Dr. Stephens will explain how NIWA is undertaking research and developing tools to help coastal and emergency managers better understand the processes that cause coastal-storm inundation, assess risk, and predict and prepare for potentially high-impact events. This includes joint-probability methods to predict storm tides and waves, user-friendly interactive presentation tools, and mapping.

Bio(s):
Scott Stephens has 15 years' experience at NIWA as a coastal oceanographer/numerical modeller focused on wave and sea-level analysis, extreme-value statistics and hydrodynamic modelling. Since 2006 Scott has pioneered the introduction of joint-probability techniques in New Zealand to determine both the frequency and magnitude of extreme storm tides and waves. Scott has applied these techniques in coastal hazard assessments in the Pacific Islands to help coastal and emergency managers better understand the processes that cause coastal-storm inundation, assess risk, and prepare for future events.

24 September 2015

Title: Keeping Tabs on HABs (Harmful Algal Blooms)
Presenter(s): Lisa Campbell, Ph.D., Professor, Departments of Oceanography and Biology, Texas A&M University
Date & Time: 24 September 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 11153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lisa Campbell, Ph.D., Professor, Departments of Oceanography and Biology, Texas A&M University

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com . Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB) combines flow cytometry and video technology to capture images of individual cells which, together with machine-learning technology, enables near real-time reporting of individual phytoplankton species abundance and community composition. Since 2007, the continuous and automated operation of the IFCB in the Gulf of Mexico has provided successful early warning for seven harmful algal bloom (HAB) events. Initial stages of HABs were detected with sufficient time to close shellfish harvesting and prevent human illness. Time series data are also being used to develop models to determine the origin of HAB populations and forecast HAB occurrences. Beginning in 2016, the IFCB network will be expanded with the addition of a second instrument, which will provide additional information for model development and validation.

Bio(s):
Dr. Lisa Campbell is a Professor in the Department of Oceanography, with a joint appointment in the Department of Biology, at Texas A&M University. She is also a member of the Faculty of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. She received her M.S. in Marine Environmental Science and Ph.D. in Oceanography from Stony Brook University, NY. Prior to joining the faculty at Texas A&M in 1996, she held Research Scientist positions at University of Hawaii (1987-1996), Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in Maine (1986-1988) and the Oceanic Institute (1985-1986). Her research focuses on phytoplankton ecology. She has conducted field work in all oceans, but her current research centers on harmful algal blooms in the Gulf of Mexico. She has established a system for real-time imaging of phytoplankton that has successfully provided early warning of potential toxic blooms seven times since 2007. Dr. Campbell currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography and on the National Committee on Harmful Algae. She has published over 90 peer-reviewed publications, 8 book chapters, and received the Dean's Distinguished Achievement Award for Faculty Research in 2009 and the Women's Faculty Network award for Outstanding Mentoring in 2015.
Title: HDF5 (Hierarchical Data Format)
Presenter(s): Elena Pourmal, The HDF Group
Date & Time: 24 September 2015
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Elena Pourmal, The HDF group POC Eugene.Mirvis@noaa.gov For teleworkers who want to watch the seminar remotely: 1. GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/703126781 Meeting ID: 703-126-781 2. Dial-in Number: 877-577-6071 3124918# Abstract Elena Pourmal is a Director of Technical Operations at The HDF Group. She leads development, maintenance and support of the HDF products including HDF5. Among the company's customers are government agencies such as NASA, NOAA, and DOE, academia, and many commercial companies such as financial, gas and oil, airspace and financial industries to name a few. The HDF Group also works with many international institutions including the Light Source Centers and Met Office in Europe. HDF5 (Hierarchical Data Format) is a data model, I/O library, and file format for storing, managing and exchanging data. It supports variety of data types, and is designed for flexible and efficient HPC I/O of high volume and complex data. HDF5 is portable and is extensible, allowing applications to evolve in their use. The HDF5 Technology suite includes tools and applications for managing, manipulating, viewing, and analyzing data in the HDF5 format. In this presentation speaker will introduce The HDF Group (http://www.hdfgroup.org), located located in Champaign Illinois at the University of Illinois Research Park. The HDF Group - a non-for-profit organization with the mission to sustain current HDF technologies and to provide continual accessibility to data stored in HDF. Elena will discuss the most powerful HDF5 features: portability, unlimited file sizes, flexible I/O including parallel I/O, and internal compression mechanism, that provide solutions for many computational and data problems. Several community standards such as HDF-EOS, netCDF-4, CGNS are built on top of the HDF5 library and underlying file format, making those standards very attractive to all kind of applications.

28 September 2015

Title: California Drought: ENSO Implications and Forecast Outlook
Presenter(s): Jon Gottschalck, NOAA Climate Prediction Center, Richard Seager, LDEO/Columbia University, Andrew Hoell, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory
Date & Time: 28 September 2015
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual access recommended (see event description for details). Limited seating in SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl.
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jon Gottschalck (NOAA Climate Prediction Center), Richard Seager (LDEO, Columbia University), Andrew Hoell (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory) Seminar sponsor: OAR, CPO, MAPP Program Seminar POC for questions: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov Where: Remote access suggested, but some seats available in NOAA HQ SSMC3, 12th floor fishbowl

Remote Access:
WebEx: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e6866054390d07a136d9b14484a25a823 Passcode: 20910 Call-in information will pop up on-screen once you have logged into WebEx Abstracts: Jon Gottschalck - The most recently released outlooks from the Climate Prediction Center will be reviewed. The talk will first review the current status of the ongoing El Niño event and then show the latest official ENSO forecast for the next several months. How anticipated El Niño conditions are represented in the latest CPC official seasonal precipitation and drought outlooks is then illustrated along with some additional relevant forecast tools that influence the outlooks. Richard Seager - The causes of the circulation and precipitation anomalies that have led to four consecutive winters of low California precipitation and serious drought will be briefly reviewed.The implications of forecast El Niño conditions for winter 2015/16 will then be presented. The relationship between precipitation and tropical Pacific SST anomalies is quite nonlinear for both northern and southern California and for the first (Nov-Jan) and second (Feb-Apr) halves of the winter half year. The observational record suggests that only strong El Niño events produce high probabilities of wet conditions in California. In the first half of winter strong El Niños favor higher than normal precipitation only in southern California while the influence extends to all of California in the second half of winter. Hence to seriously alleviate the drought the current El Niño needs to maintain strength throughout the winter. During El Niño evolution, the strengthening from early to late winter of the link between tropical Pacific SST and California precipitation arises because the teleconnected North Pacific low anomaly deepens even as the tropical Pacific SST anomalies weaken. This teleconnection evolution is reproduced by SST-forced models. Why it happens is not known but makes clear that the sub seasonal to seasonal (S2S) evolution of tropical Pacific teleconnections needs further study. The September 2015 initialized forecasts indicate a very strong El Niño lasting through the winter with, importantly for California, the dynamical model average forecasting record NINO3.4 anomalies for FMA. The implications for drought alleviation will be discussed. Andrew Hoell - The sensitivity of California precipitation to El Niño intensity is investigated, focusing especially on whether wet conditions during 1983 and 1998 are reliable indicators for extreme El Niño impacts. A multi-model ensemble of historical climate simulations is examined to determine wet and dry probabilities as a function of El Niño strength. Moderate El Niño events fail to appreciably alter wet or dry risks across northern and central California, though odds for wet conditions increase across southern California. Major increases in wet probabilities occur during very strong El Niño events across the entire state. In California's main northern watershed regions, simulations indicate a 95% chance of greater than normal precipitation, and a 50% probability of at least 150% of normal. Results indicate predictions of El Niño strength to be highly relevant for California precipitation forecasting, and that a situational awareness of El Niño strength is important for water resource planning.
Title: Ocean acidification impacts on the Pacific Northwest oyster industry: Resilience through collaboration and adaptation
Presenter(s): Alan Barton, Whiskey Creek Oyster Hatchery and George Waldbusser, Oregon State University
Date & Time: 28 September 2015
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual attendance only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8078930335183560449
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Alan Barton, Whiskey Creek Oyster Hatchery and George Waldbusser, Oregon State University

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8078930335183560449

Sponsor(s):
California Current Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The Pacific Northwest oyster industry has led the way globally in adapting to current day ocean acidification impacts on aquaculture. This story of resilience will be presented by two of several key players in the early recognition of the ocean acidification impacts, and adapting to keep the oyster industry viable through unprecedented production failures in hatcheries. Alan Barton and George Waldbusser will briefly discuss the evolution of the problem, how the partnerships formed, what the industry is currently doing, and ongoing research to better understand acidification impacts within and outside hatcheries.

30 September 2015

Title: Rescheduled to 10/13: Community Perspectives on Ocean Use in the Pacific: Informing Offshore Renewable Energy Planning through Participatory Mapping
Presenter(s): Mimi D'Iorio, NOAA MPA Center
Date & Time: 30 September 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mimi D'Iorio, NOAA's Marine Protected Areas Center, Mimi.diorio@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars. For Audio dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For Webcast: go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
The Pacific Regional Ocean Uses Atlas (PROUA) project, a BOEM-NOAA interagency effort, combined stakeholder engagement strategies with participatory mapping tools to collect community perspectives on ocean uses to inform offshore renewable energy planning. Through a series mapping workshops, the PROUA engaged local use experts to map over 30 separate ocean uses off of Washington, Oregon and the Hawaiian Islands. The resulting spatial data, maps and tools for exploring ocean use interactions will help BOEM make more informed leasing decisions in the Pacific region. This presentation will provide an overview of the PROUA project, highlighting the outcomes and products that are now available to inform marine planning on the west coast and in Hawaii.

Bio(s):
Dr. Mimi D'Iorio is the GIS manager for NOAA's Marine Protected Areas Center. Mimi manages the MPA Inventory database and leads participatory ocean uses mapping efforts designed to collect spatial data on human uses of the ocean to inform coastal and marine resource management and decision making. She also works with state and regional partners to help integrate geospatial data and tools into coastal and marine management strategies.

1 October 2015

Title: Coastal ocean dynamics influence on harmful algal blooms with insights gained from integrating autonomous gliders, moorings, and satellite observations
Presenter(s): Bridger N. Seegers, NOAA OAR Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes/Science Advisory Board
Date & Time: 1 October 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Bridget N. Seegers, NOAA OAR Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes/Science Advisory Board; bridget.seegers@noaa.gov

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series and NOAA Central Library. Contacts: helen.cheng@noaa.gov or Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301‐713‐2600 ext. 140)

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866‐833‐7307, participant code is 8986360# . Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
"My research is fundamentally an exploration of why, when, and where do specific types of algal blooms occur with a focus on harmful algal blooms (HABs). Many bloom events are studied opportunistically or have limited synoptic sampling after the bloom is established, which leads to an inability to make predictions because bloom initiation and evolution are seldom observed. I used multi-month glider (autonomous underwater vehicle) deployments and Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) moorings combined with satellite data for in situ and remote sensing monitoring of subsurface and surface ocean conditions. The majority of the research focused on the late winter to spring in the coastal region of the Southern California Bight. This period was selected, because it historically has the highest rates of toxic algal blooms dominated by neurotoxin producing Pseudo-Nitzschia genus, which is a threat to humans and wildlife. The results revealed for the first time blooms of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. can develop offshore and subsurface prior to their manifestation in the surface layer and/or near the coast." Highlights: • Combined use of new marine technologies including gliders, ESP moorings, and satellite data to study harmful algal blooms. • Blooms of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. can develop offshore and subsurface prior to their manifestation in the surface layer and/or near the coast.

Bio(s):
Bridget is currently a Knauss fellow shared between OAR's Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and NOAA's Science Advisory Board. Her most recent tasks included attempting to find contact information for Tesla's co-founder, Elon Musk, so Dr. Sullivan could invite him to speak at a Science Advisory Board meeting. Originally from Wisconsin Bridget grew up swimming and splashing in lakes and developed a love of being in, on, and around water. Bridget received her B.A in Biology from Carleton College in 2001 with a concentration in Environmental Science and Technology. She taught six years in a range of non-traditional classroom settings from the woods of Minnesota to inner city Boston as an AmeriCorps volunteer and at a charter high school in San Diego. Bridget returned to school in 2007 to earn a M.S. in Water Resources Science from the University of Minnesota. And in 2009 Bridget began her PhD in Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography at the University of Southern California studying Harmful Algal Blooms off the Southern California Coast and she successfully defended in December 2014.
Title: Incorporating Ocean Change into Fisheries Planning: Sea Scallops, Ocean Acidification and Warming
Presenter(s): Sarah Cooley, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC, USA
Date & Time: 1 October 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sarah Cooley, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC, USA. Project co-authors and presentation contributors include Jennie E. Rheuban, Deborah R. Hart, Victoria Luu, David M. Glover, Jonathan A. Hare, and Scott C. Doney

Sponsor(s):
NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinars use phone & internet. Audio: Dial toll-free (U.S.) 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast: Go to www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf.no: 744925156. No code for web.

Abstract:
Marine resources face a host of environmental pressures, from carefully managed harvests, to natural environmental variability, to gradual ocean changes like ocean acidification and warming. Many valuable United States invertebrate fisheries, including the Atlantic sea scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) fishery, are expected to be negatively impacted by ocean acidification. Even though responsive management has been proven to sustain abundant harvests of this species, the gradual advance of ocean acidification and warming adds new complexity to managing this fishery. To begin to consider how all of these factors layer together, we have recently built an integrated assessment model (IAM) that numerically simulates oceanographic, population dynamic, and socioeconomic relationships for the U.S. commercial sea scallop fishery. Our primary goal is to enrich resource management discussions by offering both short- and long-term insight into how the oceanography, population dynamics, and human system involved with this fishery interact. We will present this model system and some early results indicating how the different elements influence each other.

Bio(s):
Sarah Cooley is the Science Outreach Manager in the Ocean Acidification Program at Ocean Conservancy, Washington DC, USA. She conducts scientific research to support the development of sound ocean acidification policy, and she provides input on policies relevant to ocean acidification. Sarah's research focuses on how global ocean change, primarily ocean acidification, affects marine resource availability, and how that in turn impacts human communities. Previously, Sarah was a research scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where she also completed her postdoctoral studies.
Title: Engineered ecosystems: trade-offs in managing marine resources in China
Presenter(s): Cody Szuwalksi, Ph.D., Fisheries Scientist, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California Santa Barbara
Date & Time: 1 October 2015
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Cody Szuwalksi, Ph.D., Fisheries Scientist,Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California Santa Barbara Point of Contact: nwfsc.monsterjam@noaa.gov Webinar : Join Webex Meeting Number: 804 842 423 https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3000/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3000%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D373422687%26UID%3D485714733%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAAJeaYSo-_Sqwkw83oyXcvJrikJU-iMk5pYzdiOQxTG3PBmhkdvL7bD0x_aF0qaWGXOYTXLz1cIs6UyNn6_6V4YU0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dm8a10d4457fa2ec491285ce1c3c20b646 Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3207 Access code: 804 842 423 Global call-in numbers: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/globalcallin.php?serviceType=MC&ED=392662682&tollFree=0 Need help joining? Contact Support https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw0401l/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=nwfsc200&service=1

Abstract:
Global seafood demand is increasing and China is the world's largest producer and consumer of seafood. High production from China has been accompanied by exploitation rates on fished populations beyond those recommended by single-species management. Understanding the mechanisms of high Chinese seafood production may aid in optimizing future Chinese fisheries management. We explore the impacts (in terms of catch, value, and biomass in the sea) of a range of fisheries management strategies within an ecosystem model of the East China Sea. Our results suggest high exploitation rates and unselective fishing have removed larger fish and resulted in increased overall production through trophic cascades. The result of this large-scale ecosystem ‘engineering' suggests trade-offs between conservation and food production can exist. Reform towards single-species management holds no economic or production benefits in the East China Sea, but selectivity and effort can be optimized within the current indiscriminant fisheries practices to increase total catches, value, and biomass.

Bio(s):
Cody Szuwalski received his PhD from the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington under Andre Punt. His dissertation focused on the assessment and management of the snow crab fishery in the Eastern Bering Sea. He took his interest in assessment methods, a changing climate, and population dynamics to the University of California, Santa Barbara where he now works as research faculty with the Sustainable Fisheries Group (SFG). At SFG, he uses bio-economic analyses to provide guidance for under-managed fisheries around the world (e.g. China, Philippines, Indonesia, the Galapagos Islands). He also continues to explore ways of improving stock assessment methodology, understanding the drivers of marine population dynamics, and incorporating the influence of climate change into management of marine resources.

6 October 2015

Title: Dramatic Variability of the Coastal North Carolina Carbonate System Across Multiple Timescales
Presenter(s): Zackary Johnson, Assistant Professor, Duke University
Date & Time: 6 October 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Virtual Attendance only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7602318432948823810
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Zackary Johnson, Duke University

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7602318432948823810

Sponsor(s):
Southeast Ocean and Coastal Acidification Network, State of the Science webinar series. Point of Contact: Jenn Bennett-Mintz, jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from anthropogenic sources is acidifying marine environments with potentially dramatic implications for the physical, chemical and biological functioning of these ecosystems. If current trends continue, mean ocean pH is expected to decrease by ~0.2 units over the next ~50 years. Yet, at the same time there is substantial spatial and temporal variability in pH and other carbon system parameters in the ocean resulting in regions that already exceed long term projected pH changes, suggesting that short-term variability is an important layer of complexity on top of long term acidification. Thus, in order to develop predictions of future climate change impacts including ocean acidification, there is a critical need to characterize the natural range and variability of the marine CO2 system and the mechanisms responsible for this variability. Here we examine pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) variability at time intervals spanning 1 hour to >5 years in a dynamic coastal marine system to quantify variability of the carbon system at multiple time scales. Daily and seasonal variability of the carbon system is largely driven by temperature, alkalinity and the balance between primary production and respiration, but high frequency variability (hours to days) is further influenced by water mass movement (e.g. tides) and stochastic events (e.g. storms). Both annual variability (~0.3 units) and diurnal variability (~0.1 units) in coastal ocean acidity are similar in magnitude to long term projections associated with increasing atmospheric CO2 and their drivers highlight the importance of characterizing the complete carbonate system (and not just pH). Short term variability of ocean carbon parameters may already exert significant pressure on some coastal marine ecosystems with implications for ecology, biogeochemistry and evolution and this shorter term variability layers additive effects and complexity, including extreme values, on top of long term trends in ocean acidification.

7 October 2015

Title: Telling the NESDIS Story through Social Media
Presenter(s): Leesha Saunders, NOAA NESDIS
Date & Time: 7 October 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East-West Highway, 2nd Floor, Silver Spring, MD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Leesha Saunders, NOAA NESDIS Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library. Contacts: Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov (301-713-2600 ext. 140), or Albert.e.Theberge.Jr@noaa.gov (Skip) (301‐713‐2600 ext. 118).

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 866-833-7307, participant code is 8986360#. Webcast at www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 742656968. Passcode is brownbag. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts.

Abstract:
Social media was initially developed for sharing photos and personal anecdotes. However, with careful planning, plus accessing and using the right tools, offices can develop dynamic, effective social media communication.This session will touch on how offices can cultivate a personable and informative social media presence, some do's and don'ts and more. ​

Bio(s):
Leesha Saunders has been with NOAA's Satellite and Information Service called NESDIS since February 2008 as a part of its communication team. Her responsibilities have ranged from setting up NESDIS exhibits around the country to managing the agency's flourishing social media presence, which includes Facebook, with more than 67,000 likes and Twitter, with more than 96,000 followers. Leesha is a graduate of the Georgetown University Center for Continuing & Professional Education in Washington, D.C., with a certificate in Social Media Management. In addition, Leesha holds a BA from the University of Maryland, University College in Communications Studies with a minor in fine Art. While at NESDIS, Leesha also has established other social media platforms including the NESDIS YouTube and Flickr accounts. Before NOAA released its social media handbook, Leesha developed a NESDIS Facebook handbook, which was later expanded to the NESDIS social media handbook, along with other guides. All NESDIS offices, with social media platforms, use the handbooks as operating tools and templates.​
Title: CANCELLED: Your National Marine Sanctuaries...Dive Deeper
Presenter(s): Steve Ellzey, Executive Producer, Development Specialist, Your Sanctuary TV, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation
Date & Time: 7 October 2015
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series - TODAY'S SEMINAR, "YOUR NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARIES - DIVE DEEPER" HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Presenter(s):
Steve Ellzey, Executive Producer, Development Specialist, Your Sanctuary TV, Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Sponsor(s):
NOAA/NOS Science Seminar Series; point of contact is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar. Audio: Dial toll-free US 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Webcast at www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code needed. Abstract and

Bio(s):
TBD
Title: Sensitivity of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Heat Transport to Forcing; Decadal Prediction over the Americas, Pacific and Atlantic Contributions
Presenter(s): Shenfu Dong, NOAA/AOML and Ben Kirtman, Unive