NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research banner
 

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
2018 Seminars

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

4 January 2018

Title: An Introduction to the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve and the Texas Gulf Region Cooperative Weed Management Areas
Presenter(s): Katie Swanson, Stewardship Coordinator, Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve, University of Texas Marine Science Institute
Date & Time: 4 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Katie Swanson, Stewardship Coordinator, Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR), University of Texas Marine Science Institute. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
This talk will provide a brief introduction on the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR), and the Texas Gulf Region Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA), a program in which the Reserve is a key partner. The Mission-Aransas NERR is a federal and state partnership that is funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and is managed by the University of Texas Marine Science Institute. A quick overview of some of the impacts that were felt at the Reserve following the direct hit of Hurricane Harvey in August of this year will also be discussed. The Texas Gulf Region CWMA is a voluntary network of public and private interests, including the Mission-Aransas NERR, with the mission to address invasive Brazilian peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolious) along the Texas Gulf Coast.

Bio(s):
Katie Swanson is a Stewardship Coordinator at the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve (the Reserve). She received a bachelor of science in biology from Hobart and Williams Smith Colleges and earned a Master's degree in marine science from the University of Texas at Austin in 2008. After almost a year of working at Padre Island National Seashore in the Sea Turtle Science and Recovery and Resource Management Divisions, Katie returned to the University of Texas Marine Science Institute to work as a lab manager and technician. She has been with the Reserve since June of 2013. As Stewardship Coordinator of the Reserve, Katie promotes the importance and necessity of conservation and the environment. She works closely with the Reserve partner landowners, specifically Fennessey Ranch outside of Bayside. She has research experience with harmful algal blooms, sea grass and marsh monitoring and surveying, invasive species, sea turtles, and marine debris.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ten Principles from Evolutionary Ecology Essential for Effective Marine Conservation
Presenter(s): Marc Mangel, Ph.D., Distinguished Research Professor, UC Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 4 January 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Marc Mangel, Ph.D., Distinguished Research Professor, UC Santa Cruz

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky Krikelas at Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.
ABSTRACT
Sustainably managing human intervention with marine species is crucial for the future health of the both natural and human populations. Yet there are diverse perspectives concerning which species can be exploited sustainably, and how best to do so. In this talk, I will review ten principles from evolutionary ecology that are important for understanding human effects on marine species. They are 1) population growth and density dependence can be modeled in several ways; 2) carrying capacity is just one of many possible state determined by the environment and biology of a species; 3) the compensatory capacity of populations relies on density dependent regulation; 4) life history traits are integral to a population's compensatory capacity; 5) metrics of individual fitness are useful indicators of the productivity of a population; 6) high fecundity and high-quality eggs are not enough for sustainability; 7) large biomass of a population does not protect it from collapse; 8) long life spans evolved for a reason; 9) Allee effects are hard to detect but should not be ignored; and 10) spatial planning (marine protected areas) should be informed by life histories. I will illustrate the principles with simple models and examples from a variety of marine species.

BIO
Marc Mangel was educated at the University of Illinois (BS in Physics 1971 with High Honors, MS in Biophysics 1972), and the University of British Columbia (PhD in Applied Mathematics and Statistics, with a focus on Mathematical Biology, 1978). He worked for the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA, the research and development center for the US Navy) from Nov 1977-Aug 1980. In 1980, Mangel moved to the University of California Davis, where he served as Assistant, Associate and Full Professor for eight years in the Department of Mathematics and eight years in the Department of Zoology/Section of Evolution and Ecology. He chaired the Department of Mathematics (1984-1989) and was founding Director of the Center for Population Biology there. In 1996, Mangel moved to the University of California Santa Cruz, where he is Distinguished Research Professor Director, Center for Stock Assessment Research, which is a partnership between the UCSC and the Santa Cruz Laboratory of the National Marine Fisheries Service. Currently he is also Adjunct Professor in the Theoretical Ecology Group at the University of Bergen and Visiting Professor at the University of Tasmania. His research program in mathematical and theoretical biology, focuses on ecology, evolution and behavior and the broad goal of combining first-rate basic science with important applied questions. He has supervised more than 50 undergraduate research projects or senior theses, 30 PhD students and 31 post-doctoral colleagues; he has served on more than 30 Ph.D. Committees.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 January 2018

Title: Eutrophication will increase during the 21st century as a result of precipitation changes
Presenter(s): Eva Sinha, Phd candidate, Department of Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, and Anna M. Michalak, Faculty member, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA
Date & Time: 9 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Eva Sinha, Phd Candidate, Department of Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, and Anna M. Michalak, Faculty member, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is available only over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcodeis needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary app works fine.

Abstract:
Questions surrounding water sustainability, climate change, and extreme events are often framed around water quantity " whether too much or too little. The massive impacts of water quality impairments are equally compelling, however, and recent years have provided a host of compelling examples of unprecedented harmful algal blooms and hypoxic dead zones. Linkages between climate change and water quality impacts are not well understood, however. The first half of the talk will frame challenges and opportunities related to characterizing water quality, bridging from local to global scales, identifying key drivers, and understanding the role of climate. In the second half of the talk we will show that climate change"induced precipitation changes alone will substantially increase (19 ± 14%) riverine total nitrogen loading within the continental United States by the end of the century for the “business-as-usual” scenario. The impacts, driven by projected increases in both total and extreme precipitation, will be especially strong for the Northeast and the corn belt of the United States. Offsetting this increase would require a 33 ± 24% reduction in nitrogen inputs, representing a massive management challenge. Globally, changes in precipitation are especially likely to also exacerbate eutrophication in India, China, and Southeast Asia. It is therefore imperative that water quality management strategies account for the impact of projected future changes in precipitation on nitrogen loading.

Bio(s):
Eva Sinha is a PhD candidate in the Department of Earth System Science at the Stanford University. She obtained her Master's in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her B-Tech in the Department of Civil Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur. She studies the impact of human-caused climate change on water quality. Her research focuses on how changes in precipitation patterns and changes in land management will impact nutrient loading, excess of which is one of the major drivers of impaired water quality. Dr. Anna M. Michalak is a faculty member in the Department of Global Ecology of the Carnegie Institution for Science and a Professor in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University. She studies the cycling and emissions of greenhouse gases at urban to global scales " scales directly relevant to informing climate and policy " primarily through the use of atmospheric observations. She also explores climate change impacts on freshwater and coastal water quality via influences on nutrient delivery to, and on conditions within, water bodies. Her approach is focused on the development of spatiotemporal statistical data fusion methods that optimize the use of limited data. She is the lead author of the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan, a former Editor of the journal Water Resources Research, and Chair of the scientific advisory board for the European Integrated Carbon Observation System. She is the recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (nominated by NASA), the NSF CAREER award, and the Leopold Fellowship in environmental leadership.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 January 2018

Title: Synthesis​ ​of​ ​public​ ​water​ ​supply​ ​use​ ​in​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States: Spatio-temporal patterns and socio-economic controls
Presenter(s): Sankar Arumugam, Ph.D., Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
Date & Time: 10 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sankar Arumugam, Ph.D., Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Dept. of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Recent U.S. Geological Survey water-use report suggests that increasing water-use efficiency could mitigate the supply-and-demand imbalance arising from changing climate and growing population. However, this rich data have neither analyzed to understand the underlying patterns, nor have been investigated to identify the factors contributing to this increased efficiency. A national-scale synthesis of public supply withdrawals (“withdrawals”) reveals a strong North"south gradient in public supply water use with the increasing population in the South contributing to increased withdrawal. Contrastingly, a reverse South"north gradient exists in per capita withdrawals (“efficiency”), with northern states consistently improving the efficiency, while the southern states' efficiency declined. Our analyses of spatial patterns of per capita withdrawals further demonstrate that urban counties exhibit improved efficiency over rural counties. Improved efficiency is also demonstrated over high-income and well-educated counties. Given the potential implications of the findings in developing long-term water conservation measures (i.e., increasing block rates), we argue the need for frequent updates, perhaps monthly to annual, of water-use data for identifying effective strategies that control the water-use efficiency in various geographic settings under a changing climate.

Bio(s):
Dr. Sankar Arumugam is a Professor in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at NCSU. He is also a University Faculty Scholar (2013-2018). He is primarily associated with the Environmental, Water Resources, and Coastal Engineering and Computing and Systems groups within the department. Dr. Arumugam currently teaches CE 383 " Hydrology and Urban Water Systems, CE 586 " Engineering Hydrology, CE 777 " Stochastic Methods in Water and Environmental Engineering and CE 786 " Hydroclimatology. Dr. Arumugam currently serves as the associate editor for the Journal of Hydrology (Elsevier) and for the Journal of Hydrometeorology (AMS). He also served as the associate editor for Water Resources Research (AGU), Journal of Hydrologic Engineering (ASCE) and as the editor of Journal of Water and Climate Change (IWA). Dr. Arumugam is also a member of American Geophysical Union, American Meteorological Society and Environmental Water Research Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He earned his B.S. in agricultural engineering in 1991, his M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering in 1996, and his Ph.D. in Water Resources Engineering in 2001.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Successful Adaptation Indicators and Metrics Project: From Pilots to System-wide Benefit
Presenter(s): Dr. Susi Moser, Susanne Moser Research and Consulting
Date & Time: 10 January 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Please register through GoToWebinar (https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8003829311182178307).
Description:

OneNOAAScience Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Susi Moser, Susanne Moser Research and Consulting Seminarsponsor: NERRS Science Collaborative (http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar). Remoteaccess: Please register through GoToWebinar (https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8003829311182178307).

Abstract:
In the face of escalating impacts from climate change, thequestion of adaptation success is a practical and moral imperative. But, how dowe know whether adaptation to climate variability and change in the coastalzone is actually occurring, and whether the adaptive actions taken are good,useful, and effective? The Successful Adaptation Indicators & Metrics(SAIM) project has worked collaboratively with five reserves (Wells NERR,Hudson River NERR, Jacques Cousteau NERR, Tijuana River NERR, and Kachemak BayNERR) and their stakeholders over the past 4 years to help answer thesequestions. Specifically, the project has uncovered insights regarding: (1) whatclimate change adaptation success means in different locations, (2) whatrelevant actions and processes are needed to move toward aspired goals, and (3)the challenges involved in setting up a manageable approach to track progresstoward a common vision. The Science Collaborative team - together with thereserve partners - is now at the point of synthesizing lessons learnedand finding ways to share them in the most useful way with the NERR System as awhole. Join the webinar to learn more about the project, some lessons learned,and help us determine what would be most useful deliverables from the projectfor you. See Project Page: Successful Adaptation Indicators and Metrics SeminarPOC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.edu

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Tools for evaluating tradeoffs inherent in marine ecosystem-based management: a perspective from the West Coast
Presenter(s): Isaac Kaplan, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 10 January 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/648CBS, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Isaac Kaplan, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC)

Abstract:
Isaac Kaplan will discuss tools in use on the West Coast to assess several core tradeoffs inherent in ecosystem-based marine management. These include 1) tradeoffs between recovering marine mammal populations and protected or harvested fish stocks 2) harvest of forage fish that also sustain predator populations 3) energy development that excludes some types of fishing 4) global scale decisions about business-as-usual CO2 emissions versus local effects on fisheries. The case studies emphasize the need for collaborative interdisciplinary efforts that apply a suite of modeling approaches, with rapid deployment of simple models that can identify data gaps and inform more detailed approaches.

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the January EBM/EBFM seminar: https://goo.gl/648CBS After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Bio(s):
Isaac Kaplan is a Research Fishery Biologist at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA. He is a member of the Conservation Biology Division and the Integrative Marine Ecology Team, and the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment. His research collaborations involve food web modeling, bioenergetics, seasonal ocean forecasting, and "end-to-end" Atlantis simulation models that include oceanography, ecology, and fishing fleet dynamics.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 January 2018

Title: Effects of Shoreline Hardening on Waterbirds in the Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Diann Prosser, Ph.D., Research Wildlife Ecologist, USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Date & Time: 11 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Diann Prosser, Ph.D., Research Wildlife Ecologist, USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Elizabeth.Turner@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
In many coastal regions throughout the world, there is increasing pressure to harden shorelines to protect residential and commercial properties against sea-level rise, storm surge and erosion. This study examined waterbird community integrity in relation to shoreline hardening and land use characteristics at three geospatial scales: (1) the shoreline scale characterized by seven shoreline types: bulkhead, riprap, developed, natural marsh, Phragmites-dominated marsh, sandy beach, and forest; (2) the local subestuary landscape scale including land up to 500 m inland of the shoreline; and (3) the watershed scale >500 m from the shoreline. From 2010 to 2014, we conducted waterbird surveys along the shoreline and open water within 21 subestuaries throughout the Chesapeake Bay during two seasons to encompass post-breeding shorebirds and colonial waterbirds in late summer and migrating and wintering waterfowl in late fall. We employed an Index of Waterbird Community Integrity (IWCI) derived from mean abundance of individual waterbird species and scores of six key species attributes describing each species' sensitivity to human disturbance, and then used this index to characterize communities in each subestuary and season. The results indicate that, while the percentage of developed land at both the local subestuary landscape and watershed scales may also negatively impact waterbirds, factors at the shoreline scale had the strongest influence on these communities. Specifically, percent coverage of bulkhead and Phragmites along shorelines were the strongest predictors of IWCI, both with negative relationships. These findings suggest that expansion of shoreline hardening and invasive Phragmites may be detrimental to waterbirds in this region.

Bio(s):
Diann Prosser is a research wildlife ecologist at the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. She began working at Patuxent in 1999. Her background is in wetland ecology and ornithology and her research interests include using spatial modeling techniques to help answer questions related to wildlife and stressors such as climate change and disease.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Post Hurricane Irma Rapid Reef Assessment in South Florida and the Florida Keys NMS
Presenter(s): Steve Gittings, Science Coordinator NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries; and Tom Moore, NOAA Restoration Center
Date & Time: 11 January 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Steve Gittings, Science Coordinator NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries; and Tom Moore, NOAA Restoration Center

Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1337756393549360131

Sponsor(s):
This webinar is part of NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center monthly webinar series focused on building and strengthening MPA networks. The series is co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OCTO).

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Following Hurricane Irma, a multi-agency and partner effort was launched to conduct a rapid assessment of the Florida Coral Reef Tract, including areas in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Science Divers surveyed more than 50 sites, from Biscayne Bay to the Marquesas, and found extensive shifting of sand and heavy sediment accumulation as well as some structural damage to individual corals and the reef itself. Using information from these surveys, a parallel effort to stabilize corals in the most impacted locations was also undertaken. Scientists will share preliminary findings from the assessment cruise and triage activities as well as how such a collaborative effort was coordinated.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 January 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: A Dynamic Model of Fishing Cruise Duration
Presenter(s): Keita Abe, Ph.D. candidate in Economics, University of Washington
Date & Time: 11 January 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Keita Abe, Ph.D. candidate in Economics, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky Krikelas at Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:
WEBINAR https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m5de78f759a29b11f50e0fdfa230450df Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 809 635 739 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 ABSTRACT In many fisheries, particularly high seas fisheries, effort is controlled primarily by scaling estimated fleet capacity to available biomass. Capacity is traditionally estimated by relating inputs to outputs, with gaps between maximum harvest and actual harvest ascribed to technical inefficiency; precaution often dictates managing for maximum technical efficiency. I demonstrate that cruise-level production is determined not only by use of quasi-fixed inputs, but rather by dynamic consideration of the rate at which fish is caught, balancing the quantity and quality of fish to maximize their cruise level revenue. This response is modeled as a daily optimal stopping problem, with the state variables representing the decreasing freshness of fish caught on each previous day of the cruise. I estimate trip duration decisions based on unusually detailed daily logbook data on a Japanese longline fleet. The dynamic discrete choice problem is modeled with a conditional choice probability (CCP) estimator, which estimates the reduced form of CCP and transition probabilities in the first step to calculate the continuation value, and estimate the structural parameter using the calculated continuation value in the second step. The predictability is improved avoiding over-fitting in flexible logit to estimate CCP in the first step with a machine learning method, elastic-net logit estimation. The results show harvesters are particularly sensitive to freshness deterioration after 20 days, and are more likely to terminate their fishing cruise when more fish is caught 20 or more days ago. This suggests that catching power defined by quasi-fixed inputs is not fully utilized due to a dynamic consideration of fish quality, and that a management strategy based solely on technical efficiency will systematically over-predict actual catches. BIO Keita Abe is a PhD candidate in Economics at the University of Washington (Seattle). He earned a Master of Arts in Economics at the University of British Columbia (2013), a Master of Science in Environmental Science at Hokkaido University (2012), and a Bachelor of Arts in Policy Studies at Kwansei Gakuin University (2009).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Vertical Datum Transformation (VDATUM) software tool
Presenter(s): Stephen White, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 11 January 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stephen White, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4503513150235676419. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (914) 614-3221 ; Access Code: 512-021-663; Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar; Webinar ID: 209-003-067.

Abstract:
VDatum is a free NOAA software tool to vertically transform geospatial data among various tidal, orthometric, and ellipsoidal vertical datums, allowing users to convert data from different horizontal/vertical references into a common system. New features and future development efforts will be discussed.

Bio(s):
Stephen White is the VDATUM Program Manager.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 January 2018

Title: Bloom and Bust: Algae Takes a Toll on the Housing Market
Presenter(s): Tingting Liu, Ph.D., Drought Policy & Impact Analyst, National Drought Mitigation Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Date & Time: 16 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tingting Liu, Ph.D., Drought Policy & Impact Analyst, National Drought Mitigation Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Presenting remotely from Lincoln, NE.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
We examine the impact of water quality in Narragansett Bay on housing prices in coastal towns and municipalities using a hedonic housing-price model. Unlike other hedonic studies of water quality, we test whether housing market responds to average water quality or more to extreme events. We also test the spatial and temporal extent of effects of water quality on housing prices. We find that poor coastal water quality, measured in terms of the concentration of chlorophyll, has a negative impact on housing prices that diminishes with distance from the shoreline. Furthermore, our finding suggests that housing prices are most influenced by the extreme environmental conditions, which may be accompanied by unpleasant odors, discoloration and even fish kills. We further predict potential increases in home values associated under water quality improvement scenarios and find an increase in the values of homes in coastal communities along Narragansett Bay of about $18 million up to $136 million.

Bio(s):
Tingting Liu joined the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) at University of Nebraska-Lincoln in September 2017 as a Drought Policy and Impact Analyst following a three-year appointment as an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) Postdoc Fellow with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. She received a Ph.D. degree in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics from University of Rhode Island in 2014, M.A. degree in Economics from Guangxi Normal University in 2006 and a B.S. in Information Management and Information System at Shanxi University in 2003. She had been an assistant professor at the Guangxi Normal University School of Economics and Management in Guilin, China prior to coming to the U.S. in 2009. Her research focuses on valuation of ecosystem goods and services, land use change, watershed management. She will focus on the impact analysis of drought and valuation of drought early warning at NDMC.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 January 2018

Title: Building a Twenty First Century Heavy Icebreaker: Balancing Security and Science Capabilities
Presenter(s): Commander Kenneth J. Boda, Chief of Aids to Navigation and Icebreaking Capabilities, Office of Cutter Forces, Commandant -CG-751, U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, DC. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 17 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Commander Kenneth J. Boda, Chief of Aids to Navigation and Icebreaking Capabilities, Office of Cutter Forces, Commandant (CG-751), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, DC. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD .

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
The United States Coast Guard is designing and building new heavy polar icebreakers to replace aging and increasingly obsolescent ships. We have developed and evaluated icebreaker operational requirements, seeking the greatest capability within the bounds of affordability. These ships must conduct the missions of U.S. Coast Guard (which include safety, security, and stewardship of U.S. waters) while serving the survey and science needs of our partner agencies across the federal government. In this presentation, Boda will outline the icebreaker acquisitions process, highlighting USCG outreach with the U.S. Navy, NOAA, industry and international partners. He will discuss the concept of icebreaker operations in both the Arctic and Antarctic, and will present the key performance capabilities required of the vessel in terms of icebreaking, endurance, and interoperability, and the resulting design implications. He will also discuss the capabilities that support U.S. Coast Guard maritime missions such as boat and aviation operations. Finally, he will detail the survey and science capabilities required of these icebreakers to increase our knowledge of the remote Polar Regions. For more information, please see the new report: "2017 U.S. billion-dollar weather and climate disasters: a historic year in context", at https://www.climate.gov/news-features/blogs/beyond-data/2017-us-billion-dollar-weather-and-climate-disasters-historic-year

Bio(s):
Commander Ken Boda is the Aids to Navigation and Icebreaker Policy and Capabilities Division Chief in the Office of Cutter Forces at Coast Guard Headquarters (CG-751). He is a career icebreaker sailor having served eight years afloat as Communications Officer and Operations Officer in USCGC POLAR SEA (WAGB 11), Supply/Training Officer in USCGC EAGLE (WIX 327), and Executive Officer in USCGC POLAR STAR (WAGB 10). His staff tours include Marine Science Instructor at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Analyst in the Office of Strategic Analysis at Coast Guard Headquarters (CG- 095), and leader of the interagency Operational Science Advisory Team (OSAT-2) for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill response. Commander Boda is a 1997 graduate of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy with a degree in Marine and Environmental Sciences (with high honors). He holds masters degrees from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in Physical Oceanography, and from the Naval War College in National Security and Strategic Studies (with distinction). Commander Boda is a 2016 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Seminar XXI Fellow. He is a native of Fairfield, Connecticut, and is married to the former Alison Baikal of Kensington, Connecticut; they have a five year old son, Patrick, and reside in Crofton, MD.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Crustacean contagion: an abundance of blue crab virus
Presenter(s): Dr. Eric J. Schott, Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, University of Maryland Center for Environment Science
Date & Time: 17 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/P3wcJP, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series


Presenter(s):
Dr. Eric J. Schott, Assistant Research Professor, Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, University of Maryland Center for Environment Science, Baltimore,MD

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/P3wcJP After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, is a crucial benthic-pelagic link in Atlantic estuarine ecosystems from Nova Scotia to Argentina. In the US, it supports a $160 million fishery. Across their range, blue crabs are infected by a pathogenic reovirus, termed CsRV1 (C. sapidus reovirus 1). In the USA,blue crabs are used to produce soft crabs, a value added product created by holding pre-molt crabs in short term aquaculture until ecdysis. Soft crab culture (a.k.a. shedding) is frequently conducted in flow through systems that draw water from a creek or estuary and return that water to the same location. Crab mortality during soft crab production is typically 25%, and the vast majority of dead peelers carry CsRV1 at levels consistent with it being the cause of death.There is concern that aquaculture effluents and millions of discarded CsRV1-infected crabs pose an infection risk to wild crab populations in estuaries surrounding large shedding facilities. To assess whether flow throughs hedding increases CsRV1 infection risk among wild crabs in the vicinity, we measured CsRV1 prevalence in crabs collected by scientific trawls both near to and far from active flow-through shedding aquaculture. A correlation between shedding system proximity and virus prevalence was observed. We also investigated the relationship between CsRV1 infection and crab condition, season and location. The findings can be used to guide changes in best aquaculture practices,but leave open the question of how much the virus impacts the overall hard crab fishery.

POC: Jen Lechuga (CESU) (jennifer.lechuga@noaa.gov); Judith Salter (Librarian) (judith.salter@noaa.gov)

Bio(s):
Eric Schott received his B.A. from Reed College and his Ph.D. in genetics from Harvard University Medical School. Dr. Schott conducted postdoctoral training at Johns Hopkins University and the Center of Marine Biotechnology, and assumed his present position in 2010 as Research Assistant Professor for the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology (IMET). His research program focuses on:

· Health and disease of marine invertebrates· Development and application of molecular tools to discover and monitor marine pathogens · Novel approaches to discovering marine and aquaculture pathogens· Science communication with nonscientists in fishing and urban communities Schott's current focus is on a pathogenic virus of blue crab that plagues captive blue crabs and is also prevalent in wild crabs. His current NOAA-funded research is examining how the virus may interact with blue crab fishery activities.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NOAA Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing Lunch and Learn Series: Volunteer Recruitment and Engagement
Presenter(s): Alyson Eberhardt and Caitlin Mandeville, New Hampshire Sea Grant, Noah Newman, Colorado State University, and Katie Sweeney, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 17 January 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3, Rm 3404, Silver Spring, MD or via webinar; see remote access info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Alyson Eberhardt (New Hampshire Sea Grant), Caitlin Mandeville, (New Hampshire Sea Grant), Noah Newman (Colorado State University), Katie Sweeney (Alaska Fisheries Science Center)

Sponsor(s):
Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov, Acting NOAA Citizen Science Coordinator

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://noaaevents3.webex.com/noaaevents3/onstage/g.php?MTID=ecc0a5c0e9c589f344aeed0e5cd28bd9e

Abstract:
The NOAA Citizen Science Community of Practice will be kicking off a new lunch and learn series on contemporary topics in citizen science and crowdsourcing featuring the agency's various projects and programs. The first presentation will feature an overview of 3 citizen science programs with a focus on volunteer recruitment and retention. Four speakers will give speed talks that: 1) Describe their program; 2) Highlight volunteer recruitment and retention techniques used; and 3) Discuss which recruitment and retention strategies have been most effective and why. The featured speed talks and presenters are: 1.) Coastal Research Volunteer (CRV) Program: Given limited resources available to support research and monitoring, the CRV program is a citizen science group created to increase research capacity as well as to provide community members with authentic research and stewardship experiences along the coast. The CRV program is a novel model of citizen science that engages both adult and student volunteers to work with university researchers and state and local partners on a variety of projects. CRV projects vary and currently include horseshoe crab surveys, monitoring blue mussels for toxic contaminants, oyster research, American eel monitoring, sand dune restoration and research, beach profiling, and ascophyllum phenology monitoring.

Presenter(s):
Alyson Eberhardt, Coastal Ecosystems Specialist and Manager of the Coastal Research Volunteer Program, New Hampshire Sea Grant and Caitlin Mandeville, Citizen Science Outreach Coordinator for the Coastal Research Volunteer Program, New Hampshire Sea Grant 2. Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow (CoCoRaHS) Network: CoCoRaHS is a grassroots volunteer organization where participants use a standardized manual rain gauge to measure and report their precipitation totals. Precipitation can be widely variable, as most people know by watching it rain across the street, but not on them! The more volunteers who report, the better meteorologists at the NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) know when and where the precipitation did or did not fall. The data are not only used by the NWS, but also are used by local municipalities, private businesses, researchers, farmers, engineers, teachers, and more. Participants come from all ages and backgrounds and data are immediately made available in map or list formats.

Presenter(s):
Noah Newman, CoCoRaHS Education Coordinator, Colorado State University. 3. Zooniverse Project Steller Watch: The Steller sea lion population in the westernmost Aleutian Islands has declined an alarming 94 percent in the last 30 years. Complicating matters, the Aleutian Islands are remote and inaccessible so the NOAA Marine Mammal Laboratory has placed remote cameras at known sea lion sites to capture images year-round. Sightings of permanently marked sea lions from these images will eventually help NOAA figure out why this population continues to decline. With the online Zooniverse project, Steller Watch, NOAA can engage with citizen scientists who help classify these images in order to narrow down hundreds of thousands of images to those of the highest priority for biologists to review.

Presenter(s):
Katie Sweeney, Biologist, Marine Mammal Laboratory, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

18 January 2018

Title: U.S. Billion-dollar Weather and Climate Disasters of 2017 – A Historic Year in Context
Presenter(s): Adam B. Smith, Applied Climatologist at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information. Presenting remotely from Asheville, NC
Date & Time: 18 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see login below), or at NOAA Silver Spring, SSMC4, Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Adam B. Smith, Applied Climatologist at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Presenting remotely from Asheville, NC.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) tracks U.S. weather and climate events that have great economic and societal impacts (www.ncdc.noaa.gov/billions). Since 1980, the U.S. has sustained 219 weather and climate disasters where the overall damage costs reached or exceeded $1 billion (including adjustments for inflation as of December, 2017). The cumulative costs for these 219 events exceed $1.5 trillion. During 2017, the U.S. experienced a historic year of weather and climate disasters. In total, the U.S. was impacted by 16 separate billion-dollar disaster events including: three tropical cyclones, eight severe storms, two inland floods, a crop freeze, drought and wildfire. More notable than the high frequency of these events is the cumulative cost, which exceeds $300 billion in 2017 - a new U.S. and global annual record for a single country. The cumulative damage of these 16 U.S. events during 2017 is $306.2 billion, which shatters the previous U.S. annual record cost of $214.8 billion (CPI-adjusted), established in 2005 due to the impacts of Hurricanes Dennis, Katrina, Rita and Wilma. The following briefing will provide numerous data tables, charts, maps and background on how these extreme events are analyzed. For more information, please see the new report: "2017 U.S. billion-dollar weather and climate disasters: a historic year in context", at https://www.climate.gov/news-features/blogs/beyond-data/2017-us-billion-dollar-weather-and-climate-disasters-historic-year.

Bio(s):
Adam B. Smith is an applied climatologist at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Center for Weather & Climate. He performs research to homogenize and transition disparate disaster data sources into better quality-controlled disaster cost frameworks, as research tools and has expertise in developing methods to quantify natural disaster costs and uncertainty: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/billions Smith is a NOAA expert on U.S. disaster loss data in support of the international Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2016-Present), and is part of the Integrated Research on Disaster Risk interdisciplinary working group on Natural Disaster Risk/Loss Data integration (2012-2015) and the American Meteorological Society Committee on Financial Weather/Climate Risk Management (2015-2017). Smith has contributed to many widely cited research and data products, including: Getting Smart About How We Finance Disaster Resilience (2016), U.S. National Infrastructure Strategy (2015), IPCC AR5, Building Drought Resilience in Agriculture (2015), Disaster-Resilient Buildings, Infrastructure and Communities (2014), U.S. Energy Grid Resilience (2013), U.S. State of the Climate Annual Reports and U.S. National Climate Assessments. Some select publications include: Quantitative Approaches to Evaluating Climate Change Impacts in Socio-Environmental Systems, Public Health, and Insurance (2017), Integrated Research on Disaster Risk DATA Report, Measuring Losses from Disasters: Guidelines on Human and Economic Impact Indicators (2015), and U.S. Billion-Dollar Weather and Climate Disasters: Data Sources, Trends, Accuracy and Biases (2013).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Evaluation of Supplemental Ocean Observing Strategies in the OSSE Framework for Improving Coupled Tropical Cyclone Prediction Model Performance: Summary and Future Plans
Presenter(s): Dr. George Halliwell, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 18 January 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. George Halliwell, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/553113557 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 Access Code: 553-113-557

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

19 January 2018

Title: Alaska Region Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Richard Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region
Date & Time: 19 January 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: 407 Akasofu Building, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Richard Thoman, Climate Science and Services Manager, NWS Alaska Region Seminar

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy, Point of Contact: accap@uaf.edu

Remote Access:
Register at https://accap.uaf.edu/NWS_Briefings

Abstract:
This webinar will review recent conditions and current state of the climate system in and near Alaska and the status of important global climate drivers, review guidance available for the monthly and seasonal scale outlooks and finish up with the official outlooks by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. Rick will also present a "Feature-of-the-Month" special addition in which each month he will highlight a topic relevant to the particular month. Recordings from past Briefings available here: http://uaf.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b4e157af8905918af730d5d1c&id=6b7287a9eb&e=9097598e1a

Bio(s):
Richard Thoman works as the Climate Science and Services Manager, for NWS Alaska Region Headquarters. He works closely with NOAA line offices and partners throughout Alaska providing information on climate monitoring, analysis and forecasting at the two week to one year time frame

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 January 2018

Title: Seminar Postponed: California-Nevada Water Year: At a Critical Junction - CA-NV Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar
Presenter(s): Julie Kalansky, California-Nevada Climate Applications Program-CNAP, Shrad Shukla, University of California Santa Barbra, Tim Brown, Western Regional Climate Center/Desert Research Institute, Dennis Lettenmaier, University of California, Los Angeles
Date & Time: 22 January 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Seminar Postponed

Presenter(s):
Julie Kalansky, California-Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Shrad Shukla, University of California Santa Barbra, Tim Brown, Western Regional Climate Center/Desert Research Institute, Dennis Lettenmaier, University of California, Los Angeles Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5881811448434066689 TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the Webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (213) 929-4232 Access Code: 394-688-356 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

Abstract:
The NIDIS California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) January 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars that provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. The agenda for this month's webinar will include a drought & climate status update and outlook, a wildfire recap, and a discussion about what the current conditions could mean for 2018. There will be a Q&A session following the presentations.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

23 January 2018

Title: Convective-Scale Ensemble Prediction Experiments over Yangtze-Huaihe River Basin
Presenter(s): Prof. Huiling Yuan, Nanjing University
Date & Time: 23 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar.

Presenter(s):
Prof. Huiling Yuan, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China Contact: Yuejian Zhu JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://docsib.webex.com/docsib/j.php?MTID=m472a57b1207d47bfb57e39c975220729 JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 2) 877-577-6071 (3124918#) Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:
In this study, a convective-scale ensemble prediction system (EPS) has been established over the Yangtze-Huaihe river basin, China. The EPS was implemented at a horizontal grid spacing of 3 km based on the WRF model (version 3.9), which was initialized daily at 00 UTC and ran out to 36 h during June 2015. First, using the NCEP global forecast system (GFS) analysis as the background, radar and in-situ observations were assimilated to ARPS data assimilation system (ADAS) with cloud analysis, which was applied to produce the diabatic initial condition for the convective-scale EPS. Satellite-gauge precipitation analysis at 0.1 degree resolution was used to verify precipitation forecasts. Compared with the direct downscaling from the GFS initialization, the forecasts with cloud analysis greatly reduced the spin-up time in the WRF model, through the adjustment of hydrometeors and vertical velocity. Multiple combinations of physical parameterization schemes, including microphysics, planetary boundary layer and land surface parameterizations, were used in ensemble members to account for model uncertainties. However, the experiment of a heavy rainfall event indicated that the spread of multiple physics ensembles alone was insufficient and ensemble mean forecasts by the convective-scale EPS did not improve the forecast errors in the GFS forecasts. Therefore, the perturbations derived from the initial conditions (ICs) of the global ensemble forecast system (GEFS) were added to the cloud analysis (with two microphysical schemes) in the convective-scale EPS. One control run and 14 perturbed members were generated by the EPS, forced by randomly selected 14 GEFS members as lateral boundary conditions (BCs). Short-range (3 h or 24 h) ensemble precipitation forecasts were evaluated for one month, including several heavy precipitation events. In general, the convective-scale EPS provides skillful precipitation forecasts over the Yangtze-Huaihe river basin, in terms of rainfall location and intensity. Cloud analysis is a critical factor to improve 0-12 h forecasts, especially for strong convective events. Combination of IC perturbations from the large-scale EPS and multiple physical schemes improves the spread-skill relationship of ensemble precipitation forecasts, by mitigating the underdispersion and forecast errors in the convective-scale EPS. The improvements of cloud analysis (such as assimilation of satellite information) and convective-scale IC/BC perturbations need further investigations. Keywords: precipitation; convective-scale; ensemble prediction system (EPS); ensemble spread, perturbation; Yangtze-Huaihe river basin ====== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

25 January 2018

Title: Human influence at the coast: Upland and shoreline stressors affect coastal benthic macrofauna
Presenter(s): Rochelle D. Seitz, Research Professor and Benthic Community Ecologist, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Date & Time: 25 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rochelle D. Seitz, Research Professor and Benthic Community Ecologist, Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar hosts are Elizabeth.Turner@noaa.gov Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is available only over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcodeis needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary app works fine.

Abstract:
Anthropogenic stressors can affect subtidal communities within the land-water interface. Increasing anthropogenic activities, including upland and shoreline development, threaten ecologically important species in these habitats. In this study, we examined the consequences of anthropogenic stressors on benthic macrofaunal communities in 14 subestuaries of Chesapeake Bay. We investigated how subestuary upland use (forested, agricultural, developed land) and shoreline development (riprap and bulkhead compared to marsh and beach) affected density, biomass, and diversity of benthic infauna. Statistics suggested that upland use and shoreline development were influenced benthic communties. For benthic macrofauna, density tended to be lower in subestuaries with developed or mixed compared to forested or agricultural upland use. Benthic biomass was significantly lower in subestuaries with developed compared to forested upland use, and biomass declined exponentially with proportion of near-shore developed land. Benthic density did not differ significantly among natural marsh, beach, and riprap habitats, but tended to be lower adjacent to bulkhead shorelines. In low salinities, benthic diversity tended to be higher adjacent to natural marshes compared to the other habitats, and lower adjacent to bulkheads, but the pattern was reversed in high salinities. Sediment characteristics varied by shoreline type and contributed to differences in benthic community structure. Living shorelines were effective in supporting nearshore benthic communities in upper and lower Chesapeake Bay. Given the changes in the infaunal community with anthropogenic stressors, subestuary upland and shoreline development should be minimized to increase benthic production and subsequent trophic transfer within the food web.

Bio(s):
Dr. Rochelle Seitz has a B.A. from Colgate University, an M.S. and a Ph.D. from the College of William & Mary, and is a Research Professor at the College of William and Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Her research interests center around benthic community ecology, particularly changes in benthic invertebrate diversity with environmental stress, effects of shoreline development and hypoxia, predator-prey dynamics, top-down versus bottom-up control of benthic systems, effects of ocean acidification, and conservation biology. Seitz website is: http://www.vims.edu/research/departments/bio/people/faculty/seitz_borrowed.php

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Transforming career development to advance diversity and equity in STEM
Presenter(s): Claire Horner-Devine, Ph.D., Co-Director of BRAINS & LATTICE, University of Washington; Founder, Counterspace Consulting
Date & Time: 25 January 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NWFSC
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Claire Horner-Devine, Ph.D., Co-Director of BRAINS & LATTICE, University of Washington; Founder, Counterspace Consulting

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series Vicky Krikelas at Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. WEBINAR Join Webex : https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m5de78f759a29b11f50e0fdfa230450df Meeting number and Access Code: 809 635 739 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 ABSTRACT Successful scientists need much more than scientific skills and expertise to thrive in their careers. Impactful training and ongoing engagement with professional development topics including mentoring, time management, strategic planning and communication skills, among others, are essential. Further, individual scientists benefit greatly from training on how to navigate the social and cultural landscape of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). This is especially true for scientists from underrepresented groups (URGs, e.g. gender, race, ethnicity, ability status, among others) in STEM, as our institutions and embedded scientific culture were not designed with them in mind. We will highlight a suite of factors identified by social science research that are related to career success for individuals from URGs in STEM. Then using over a decade of programming and participant data, we will discuss three, federally funded, national programs intentionally designed to address these factors and developed to accelerate and improve the career advancement of early career researchers from URGs in STEM. We will share key program components and impacts, and we will discuss three insights that we have learned are essential to the transformative career development training we provide. We will finish by discussing how these elements might be incorporated into opportunities for career development programming across career stages in marine science and management. BIO Dr. Claire Horner-Devine is the co-founder and co-director of three, federally funded, national programs (BRAINS, WEBS, and LATTICE) designed to accelerate and improve the career advancement of early-career women and researchers from underrepresented groups in STEM. She is also is the founder of Counterspace Consulting and creates professional development and leadership opportunities for STEM professionals, grounded in social science research and with equity, diversity and inclusion at their core. She has published this work in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, CBE " Life Sciences Education and Neuron. Dr. Horner-Devine received her B.A from Princeton University and her Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from Stanford University and has published her work in community ecology, microbial ecology and conservation biology in journals such as Nature, Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Ecology. She worked as a faculty member in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington for almost a decade. She also served as Director of Leadership and Diversity in the College of the Environment at UW. RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS Horner-Devine, M.C., C. Margherio, S.J.Y. Mizumori, and J.W. Yen Peer Mentoring Circles: A strategy for thriving in science. BioMed Central Blog., May 18, 2017. http://blogs.biomedcentral.com/bmcblog/2017/05/18/peer-mentoring-circles-a-strategy-for-thriving-in-science/ Horner-Devine M. C., Yen J., Mody-Pan P., Margherio C., Forde S. 2017. The BRAINS Program: Transforming Career Development to Advance Diversity and Equity in Neuroscience. Neuron. 4(3): 426-430. Yen, J.W., Horner-Devine M. C., Yen J., Mody-Pan P., Margherio C., Forde S. 2016. Beyond traditional scientific training: The importance of community and empowerment for women in ecology and evolutionary biology. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 4: 119. Margherio, C., M.C. Horner-Devine, S.J.Y. Mizumori, and J.W. Yen 2016. Learning the Thrive: Building diverse scientists' access to community and resources through the BRAINS program. CBE Life Sciences Education. 15:ar49.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

29 January 2018

Title: Climate oscillations, the Cold Pool, and walleye pollock recruitment in the Bering Sea: lessons from recent years and the outlook for 2018
Presenter(s): Dr. Janet Duffy-Anderson, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Eco-FOCI Program
Date & Time: 29 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 12836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dr. Janet Duffy-Anderson, Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Eco-FOCI Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology

Remote Access:
https://noaast.adobeconnect.com/ost_brown_bag_seminar_29_jan/ Participants: please click the link above. In the field "Name"; type your name as you would like to be seen in the meeting; Click "Enter Room" *** NO PASSWORD IS NEEDED*** The Adobe Connect will open in a separate window, shown you as participate You can also dial in using your phone. United States: 877-984-9436 Access Code: 8591340

Abstract:
The southeastern Bering Sea shelf experienced unprecedented warming from 2014-2016. Ecosystem observations from this most recent warm stanza included sea surface temperatures as high as 15oC, the presence of coccolithophore blooms, reduced abundances of lipid-rich copepods, and an eastward shifted distribution of young-of-the-year (YOY) walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) with moderately low energetic content. These observations indicated that YOY walleye pollock would experience increased susceptibility to over-winter mortality and catastrophic population declines up to 40% were feared. Despite these warning signs, significant declines in the pollock population did not occur. Evidence from ecosystem surveys indicated that warming in 2015, the second year of the three-year stanza, was atypical relative to prior warm stanzas and offered an avenue for fish refuging from deleterious warm ecosystem conditions. We propose a new hypothesis, the Cold Pool Refuge Hypothesis, to explain these events and we present evidence to support the idea. The Bering Sea has recently entered a cooler period, with spring 2017 sea ice covering much of the southern shelf and into Bristol Bay and cooler conditions observed over the summer. We evaluate ecosystem conditions in 2017 relative to the 2014-2016 warm stanza and provide an outlook for walleye pollock survival and recruitment success in 2018 and beyond.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

30 January 2018

Title: Data Driven Decision-Making: Introducing the American Community Survey
Presenter(s): Nesreen Khashan, Data Dissemination Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 30 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Nesreen Khashan, Data Dissemination Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Whether you are in public health or public policy, the nonprofit sector or in business, you can make data-driven decisions using statistics from the nation's largest statistical agency, the U.S. Census Bureau. This webinar will introduce you to the American Community Survey, which releases more than 65 demographic, socio-economic and housing measures every year at granular geographic levels. Inform your research while revealing insightful narratives about the areas you serve by analyzing trends, comparing geographies and examining variations of characteristics across communities. These estimates are publicly-accessible via the Census Bureau's website and API. You'll receive a brief demonstration of a handful of tools that will help you access these data and learn where to find methodology and technical notes. We'll conclude with some useful tips on how to sign up for free webinars and on-site trainings.

Bio(s):
As a data dissemination specialist, Nesreen Khashan provides presentations and trainings to the public on how to access and understand Census Bureau statistics. Since 2012, Nesreen has served in this role for the state of Maryland and the Metro DC area. Most recently, she has included Virginia in her service area. She has helped scores of small business owners, grant writers, educators, journalists, and others use statistics to improve how they make decisions and assess the effectiveness of their current operations. Delivering trainings both in person and via webinars, she has been able to expand her reach as demand to understand publicly available data increases. Nesreen is also a contributing writer to America Counts, the Census Bureau's story-telling portal (census.gov/AmericaCounts).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

31 January 2018

Title: Planning for a Biogeochemical-Argo profiling float array: Results from the SOCCOM array and future goals
Presenter(s): Ken Johnson, Senior Scientist​, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Date & Time: 31 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/fRNBgG OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

Description: OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ken Johnson, Senior Scientist, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring and can't join us in the NOAA Central Library, please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/fRNBgG After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

POC: Shelby Brunner (shelby.brunner@noaa.gov), OAR/CPO/OOMD; Judith Salter OAR/NOAA Library judith.salter@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Biogeochemical-Argo is the extension of the Argo array of profiling floats to include floats that are equipped with biogeochemical sensors for pH, oxygen, nitrate, chlorophyll, suspended particles, and downwelling irradiance. This array of biogeochemical floats will enable an observing system that can determine the seasonal to decadal-scale variability in biological productivity, the supply of essential plant nutrients from deep-waters to the sunlit surface layer, ocean acidification, hypoxia, and ocean uptake of carbon dioxide. Planning for a global array has focused on the deployment of regional systems that operate at the scale of an ocean basin to validate the concept. The major effort in the US has been the Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) array. The SOCCOM program, with NSF, NOAA, and NASA support, has targeted 200 profiling floats with oxygen, nitrate, pH and bio-optical sensors in the poorly observed regions from 30°S down to areas with seasonal ice coverage as far as 75°S. Computer and statistical models indicate that a global array of 1000 biogeochemical floats will provide a transformative impact on our knowledge of oceanic biogeochemical cycles, including carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. With nearly 100 floats now operating in the SOCCOM array, we have achieved 1/10 of the global target. Much of the talk will focus on the results and lessons learned from the SOCCOM array. The remainder of the talk will emphasize the resources and effort needed to extend regional arrays, such as SOCCOM, to a global extent.

Bio(s):
Kenneth S. Johnson is a Senior Scientist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. He received his B.S. degrees in Chemistry and Oceanography from the University of Washington and his Ph.D. in Oceanography from Oregon State University. Prior to joining MBARI, he was Professor of Oceanography at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. At MBARI, he directs the Chemical Sensor Laboratory, which is focused on the development of sensors that can be deployed in large scale, wireless networks and the application of these tools to studies of chemical cycling and ecosystem health throughout the ocean. A major effort is building a network of 200 biogeochemical profiling floats through the SOCCOM project (Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling; http://soccom.princeton.edu). These systems, which include ISUS/SUNA nitrate sensors and DuraFET pH sensors developed in the Chemical Sensor Lab, observe ocean carbon uptake year around in a region that is seldom visited by scientists. His long-term goal is the development of a global scale observing system using profiling floats that can directly monitor the impacts of climate on the ocean carbon cycle and ocean health. He serves as Co-Chair of the Biogeochemical-Argo program (http://biogeochemical-argo.org) , a consortium of 15 nations that are working to achieve this goal.Johnson is author of more than 150 papers in scientific journals, including 15 papers in the journals Science and Nature. He served two terms as Chair of the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), which coordinates activities of ~20 large US research vessels. Johnson was selected Sverdrup Lecturer for the American Geophysical Union and was elected Fellow of the American Geophysical Union in 2011. He received the Ed Ricketts Memorial Award from the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary in 2012.Note: Dr. Ken Johnson will be presenting remotely, but you are welcome to follow along with us in the NOAA Central Library Brown Bag area.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Naval Research Lab Monterey VIIRS Imagery Comparisons With Other Sensors
Presenter(s): Kim A. Richardson, Naval Research Lab, Marine Meteorology Division, Monterey CA
Date & Time: 31 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room S650, Greentech IV Building 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kim A. Richardson, Naval Research Lab (NRL), Marine Meteorology Division (MMD), Monterey CA

Host: JPSS PROVING GROUND SEMINAR
POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

Webex: 877-401-9225 pc: 53339716

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m7c3ffa77d94a90315a6cced8934e9242
Meeting number: 749 638 072
Host key: 536978
Meeting password: Jpss2018!

Abstract:
NRL Monterey has been producing satellite imagery for distribution to the DoD and public since 1995. As new satellites and sensors have come on line the team of satellite remote sensing scientists have created codes to acquire, section, and produce value added satellite sensor products near real time for distribution on several web pages. Currently 36 satellite sensors are used for product display on https://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/NEXSAT.html.

Upon the lunch of SNPP NRL Monterey actively downloaded VIIRS level 1B data sets from three different sites, to settle upon downloads from Science Investigation Processing Systems (SIPS) at the University of Wisconsin for VIIRS SDR downloads. NRL then had the capability to compare VIIRS satellite imagery products with a suite of other satellite sensors over various regions of the Earth.

VIIRS imagery has been shown to be a very superior set of products for end users to apply to their analysis of geophysical thematic events. Over the years the JPSS Science Team has worked very hard to improve upon the imagery artifacts seen in early VIIRS imagery products. These improvements have made VIIRS imagery products an important part of a daily end user experience.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Well below 2 °C: Mitigation strategies for avoiding dangerous to catastrophic climate changes
Presenter(s): Yangyang Xu, Assistant Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences , College of Geosciences, Texas A&M University. Presenting from Texas
Date & Time: 31 January 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Yangyang Xu, Assistant Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, College of Geosciences, Texas A&M University. Presenting from Texas.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
The historic Paris Agreement calls for limiting global temperature rise to "well below 2°C". Because of uncertainties in emission scenarios, climate, and carbon cycle feedback, we interpret the Paris Agreement in terms of three climate risk categories and bring in considerations of Low-Probability (5%) High-Impact (LPHI) warming in addition to the central (~50% probability) value. The current risk category of dangerous warming is extended to more categories, which are defined by us here as: >1.5°C as dangerous, >3°C as catastrophic and >5ºC as unknown, implying beyond catastrophic including existential threats. With unchecked emissions, the central warming can reach the dangerous level within three decades with the LPHI warming becoming catastrophic by 2050. We outline a three-lever strategy to limit the central warming below dangerous level and the LPHI below catastrophic level, both in the near term (<2050) and in the long term (2100): the carbon neutrality (CN) lever to achieve zero net emissions of CO2; the super pollutants (SP) lever to mitigate short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs); and the carbon extraction and sequestration (CES) lever to thin the atmospheric CO2 blanket. Pulling on both CN and SP levers and bending the emissions curve by 2020 can keep the central warming below dangerous levels. To limit the LPHI warming below dangerous levels, the CES lever must be pulled as well to extract as much as 1 trillion tons of CO2 before 2100 to both limit the pre-industrial to 2100 cumulative net CO2 emissions to 2.2 trillion tons and bend the warming curve to a cooling trend.

Bio(s):
Yangyang Xu is an assistant professor in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Texas A&M University. His research focuses on the cause and impact of climate change using a variety of climate models with different complexity. Prior to coming to Texas, he worked as a postdoc fellow and project scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research on multidecadal variability of ocean-atmosphere system and regional hydro-climate impact. He earned his PhD from Scripps Institute of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

1 February 2018

Title: Blueprint for 2022, Part 2: Geopotential Coordinates
Presenter(s): Dru Smith, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 1 February 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dru Smith, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4503513150235676419. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO:When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended.--OR--TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE:If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below.
United States: +1 (914) 614-3221 Access Code: 512-021-663Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar.

Abstract:
Learn about the recently released “Blueprint for 2022, Part 2: Geopotential Coordinates” (NOAA Technical Report NOS NGS 64). This document discusses many of the technical and policy decisions regarding the planned replacement of NAVD 88 and other vertical datums in the National Spatial Reference System.

Bio(s):
Dru Smith is the National Spatial Reference System Modernization Manager.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: National Weather Service decision support for agencies that regulate watershed activities to enhance both natural resource protection and economic opportunities
Presenter(s): Troy Nicolini, Ph.D. ,Meteorologist-in-Charge, Eureka Weather Forecast Office, National Weather Service
Date & Time: 1 February 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Troy Nicolini, Ph.D., Meteorologist-in-Charge, Eureka Weather Forecast Office, National Weather Service Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky Krikelas at Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. WEBINAR Join Webex : https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m5de78f759a29b11f50e0fdfa230450df Meeting number and Access Code: 809 635 739 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 ABSTRACT An example will be provided to illustrate how the National Weather Service (NWS) can support National Marine Fisheries Services (NMFS) activities. An overview of what the NWS has to offer the NMFS will also be provided for both in-stream issues as well as for marine systems. The NMFS office in Arcata, California, implements the federal Endangered Species Act for listed salmon and steelhead. This includes the evaluation of activities that impact salmon and steelhead and their habitat, such as timber harvest, gravel extraction, and watershed restoration. Permits for these activities typically restrict work beyond October 15, which is the climatologically based start of the wet season. NMFS historically collaborated with federal and state agencies to consider extending the October 15 deadline. These decisions were based on forecast information from NWS web pages, with no interpretive assistance from NWS staff. When NMFS biologists made decisions regarding extensions based on their own weather assessment, this resulted in cases where watershed activities were suspended even though dry conditions continued beyond October 15th. This approach was effective in protecting salmon and steelhead, as long as the wet season did not start before October 15, but it resulted in unnecessary curtailment of economically important activities in North Coast watersheds. NMFS and NWS staff in NW California developed a formal program whereby NWS staff provide precipitation and hydrology interpretive services to aid in the decision making process for approving or disapproving permit extensions. This information also assists other agencies when planning for the removal of summer low bridge crossings, when to implement erosion control for in-stream projects, or with other precipitation sensitive projects as the dry season comes to an end. The net result of this program has been to provide both increased protection to the natural resources and increased opportunities for economic activities in the watersheds. BIO Troy Nicolini is the Meteorologist In Charge for the National Weather Service in Eureka California.Troy works in the area of river forecasting for which he was awarded the National Weather Service's Isaac Cline Award, and in the area of wave forecasting in the nearshore environment for which he was awarded the NOAA Administrator's Award. Prior to joining NOAA, he was a research hydraulic engineer with the US Army Corps of Engineers for 10 years. Troy is involved in salmon and steelhead issues in his spare time, such as working on logging road decommissioning and fish passage issues with the Pacific Coast Fish, Wildlife & Restoration Association, as well as leading an effort to develop improved waste water treatment solutions to improve water quality in Humboldt Bay, CA. He also commercially fishes anchovies on Humboldt Bay. Troy received his Bachelor's degree and Master's degree in civil engineering from the University of California at Davis.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

5 February 2018

Title: Modeling Regional & Global Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms: Observing Adverse Respiratory Health Effects due to Tropospheric Ozone Air Pollution from Modeling Output
Presenter(s): Emily Saunders, NASA/GSFC-SSAI
Date & Time: 5 February 2018
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Emily Saunders (NASA/GSFC, SSAI)

Title:
Modeling Regional & Global Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms: Observing Adverse Respiratory Health Effects due to Tropospheric Ozone Air Pollution from Modeling Output Date,Time, Room: Monday February 5, 2018 at 10:00am in NCWCP Rm 2890 Contact: Jeff Mcqueen jeff.mcqueen@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:
Regional air quality forecasts may be improved through the use of global model simulations to provide boundary conditions (BCs) to regional air quality models. The most important advantage of using global model BCs is that these BCs can bring time-varied external signals to the regional domain, and reflect certain event information, such as biomass burning, stratospheric intrusion, and Asian air mass inflow. These observations suggest that the use of global model BCs can improve regional air quality predictions. It also points out that further improvement in regional model predictions will require efforts to reduce the uncertainty in the global model BCs. Additional uncertainties are introduced in this importing process because of the uncertainties in the global models, and because of differences in resolution between the global and regional models, and differences in model formations, such as chemical mechanisms. The main goal of this research project was to create a new gas-phase chemical mechanism for global atmospheric chemistry models, the Global Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (GACM) that is based on the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry mechanism, version 2 (RACM2). Improved global atmospheric chemistry models with GACM can be used to supply better initial and BCs to regional air quality models especially those that use RACM2 because GACM and RACM2 are designed to be highly compatible representations of atmospheric chemistry. GACM includes marine chemistry reactions to simulate marine environments better while maintaining a compact size. For GACM some volatile organic compound (VOC) chemistry was simplified to make room the additional marine chemistry and to maintain computational efficiency. RACM2 and GACM were compared and evaluated through simple box modes and the Weather Research & Forecasting Model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem). WRF-Chem allowed RACM2 and GACM tropospheric ozone simulations to be compared under more realistic world conditions. California's South Coast Air Basin (i.e. the SoCAB region) was used as a testbed for the WRF-Chem simulations. All of these simulations showed the compatibility of RACM2 and GACM and that these two mechanisms will work well in a global-regional modeling system where GACM provides boundary conditions to a regional scale model. As a further test of the compatibility of RACM2 and GACM the WRF-Chem simulations were processed with the EPA's Environmental Benefits Mapping & Analysis Program " Community Edition (BenMAP-CE) to estimate the respiratory related human health impacts and costs within the SoCAB region. The WRF-Chem simulations with GACM and RACM2 gave very similar estimates of the negative respiratory health impacts and the cost of those health impacts. Further, our work shows that BenMAP-CE could be used to forecast routinely daily changes in air quality health impacts and costs. In closing, GACM will be applicable to current global models and can be used in conjunction with RACM2 based or other regional modeling systems to more accurately predict the amount of ozone formed in highly polluted urban local communities especially on the west coast of the United States. ====== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 February 2018

Title: Moved to 2/20: The Value of Coastal Wetlands in Reducing Flood Losses from Storms: Case-studies from the US Atlantic Coastline and Elsewhere
Presenter(s): Dr. Siddharth Narayan, coastal engineer/research scientist, University of California Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 6 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Siddharth Narayan, coastal engineer/research scientist, University of California Santa Cruz; presently remotely from Santa Cruz. Coauthors include: Michael W. Beck, Christopher Thomas, Christine C. Shepard, Paul Wilson, Inigo J. Losada, Guillermo Franco, Borja Reguero, Dania Trespalacios, and Carter J. Ingram.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
There is increasing interest these days around natural and nature-based features, such as coastal wetlands, for reducing risk.This interest spans not just the public sector (NOAA, US Army Corps of Engineers) but also the private sector (risk financing, engineering industries). A corpus of work over the last few decades shows that coastal wetlands can and do help reduce flood damages. Translating this knowledge into practical, on-the-ground measures for conservation and risk management, requires a multi-pronged effort by conservationists, engineers and academia. Key to this effort is using industry-standard tools that allow engineers and risk financers to readily measure, finance and, ultimately, implement these ‘novel' features. In this seminar Sid will discuss some of his recent work on measuring the value of coastal wetlands for reducing flood losses from storms, done in close partnership with private insurance, financial, and academic institutions. He will explore some of the main challenges and opportunities that arise out of this work for conservation and risk reduction practice.

Bio(s):
Dr. Siddharth Narayan is a coastal engineer, currently working as a research scientist at the University of California Santa Cruz. Sid is from Chennai in South India, where he earned his bachelor's degree in civil engineering. He subsequently completed a master's in Coastal Engineering at TU Delft in The Netherlands, and a PhD in coastal flood risk assessments at the University of Southampton in the UK. For the past four years, Sid's research, together with Michael Beck of The Nature Conservancy, have focused on assessments, approaches and tools to understand how, where and when conserving ecosystems can benefit people and nature. At present, he works with a team of ecologists, coastal engineers and risk modelers to assess the role and value of ecosystems for coastal risk reduction and resilience.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Meridional Overturning Circulation transport variability at 34.5degS during 2009-2017: Baroclinic and barotropic flows and the dueling influence of the boundaries
Presenter(s): Dr. Chris Meinen, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD
Date & Time: 6 February 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) (4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Chris Meinen (NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/PhOD) Sponsor NOAA OAR AOML POC for seminar questions: patrick.halsall@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
GoToMeeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/606255821 You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 606-255-821

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

7 February 2018

Title: Making estuarine shoreline science relevant to managers and policymakers
Presenter(s): Beth Turner, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Tom Jordan, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Date & Time: 7 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Beth Turner, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Tom Jordan, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Shoreline management decisions are typically done on a local or state scale, but have implications for estuarine ecosystems at a wider regional scale. Our Mid-Atlantic shorelines project was developed from the need for better knowledge about how shoreline hardening influences the ecology of adjacent estuarine systems. But better knowledge does not automatically lead to better policy and management. We engaged an advisory group of managers to help guide the science towards regional management and policy goals. This seminar will discuss how the process worked to bring management and policy input to the science and vice versa. The science team was able to make modifications to their sampling and analyses based on manager's recommendations, and the scientific results are being incorporated into the Chesapeake Bay Program's Goal Implementation Teams, planning for NOAA Habitat Focus Areas, and state management efforts.

Bio(s):
Beth Turner is an oceanographer and program manager in the NCCOS Competitive Research Program, where she manages projects dealing with multiple stresses and ocean acidification. Beth has worked at NOAA for 20 years at the intersection of science and its application. Prior to coming to NOAA, she was a program manager at the Office of Naval Research and a project manager at the Ocean Studies Board of the US National Academy of Sciences. Beth holds a Bachelor's in Biology from Texas Christian University, a Master's in Marine Environmental Science from SUNY Stony Brook, and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Delaware. She was trained as a marine benthic ecologist, and completed post-doctoral research at Rutgers University and the University of Maryland. Dr. Thomas Jordan is a Senior Scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC). He received a BS in Biology from Bucknell University, Pennsylvania; and a PhD in Biology from Boston University, Massachusetts. His research is on the transport and transformation of the nitrogen and phosphorus in ecosystems. Human alterations of the global cycles of these essential plant nutrients have led to their overabundance in aquatic ecosystems and detrimental impacts on coastal waters worldwide. Since starting at SERC in 1980, Jordan has studied the sources of nutrient releases from watersheds, the uptake of nutrients by wetlands and riparian forests, and the fates and effects of nutrients in estuaries, especially in Chesapeake Bay and its watershed.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 February 2018

Title: The Worth of Giants: The Consumptive & Non-Consumptive Use Value of the Giant Sea Bass
Presenter(s): Ana Sofia Guerra, PhD Student, UC Santa Barbara
Date & Time: 8 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ana Sofia Guerra, PhD Student, UC Santa Barbara

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
Although the economic value of wildlife has been historically attributed to its consumptive use, the global growth of ecotourism has added extra dimensions to the economic valuation of wildlife by including an accounting of the non-consumptive use of species. In California, the critically endangered giant sea bass (Stereolepis gigas) is paradoxically both a flagship species in the local recreational dive industry and regularly landed and sold in California's commercial fisheries when incidentally caught. Correspondingly, Stereolepis gigas is of economic value to a diverse set of local stakeholders. We explored the differences in the economic value of S. gigas to these two key stakeholders - commercial fishers and recreational scuba divers. Using California commercial fishery landing receipt data, we determined the average annual landing value of S. gigas to be US$12.6k In contrast we estimated the average value of S. gigas to recreational divers to be US$2.7M per year. We also qualitatively assessed potential health risk associated costs to the value of S. gigas' consumptive value by measuring mercury concentrations and found relatively high levels of methylmercury in S. gigas sampled from fish markets. Using self-reported fishery catch location data, we identified S. gigas bycatch hotspots and provide suggestions for strategic spatial and temporal closures. Overall, these results highlight the value of giant sea bass beyond fisheries and underscore the importance of incorporating non-consumptive values when developing harvest policies and marine management plans.

Bio(s):
Ana is a PhD student at UC Santa Barbara, working with the McCauley Lab and the Caselle Lab. She graduated from Stanford University in 2013 with a B.S. in Biology and before grad school spent time working in the fields of marine science, conservation communication, technical diving, and underwater photography. She is interested in researching the effects of aggregations, including fish schooling behavior and grazing on coral reefs.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Engaging governments, businesses, and the public in the fight against marine plastic litter: the #CleanSeas campaign
Presenter(s): Carla Friedrich of UN Environment
Date & Time: 8 February 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Carla Friedrich of UN Environment

Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6035325265841774850

Sponsor(s):
Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Abstract:
UN Environment launched #CleanSeas in February 2017 to engage governments, the general public, civil society and the private sector in the fight against marine plastic litter. This campaign is addressing the root cause of marine litter by targeting the production and consumption of non-recoverable and single-use plastic. It is also giving a platform to hundreds of local organizations doing important work on marine litter to highlight their efforts. The campaign contributes to the goals of the Global Partnership on Marine Litter, a voluntary open-ended partnership for international agencies, governments, businesses, academia, local authorities and non-governmental organizations hosted by UN Environment. Learn more about #CleanSeas at http://cleanseas.org.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 February 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: The quest for policy invariant relationships: going beyond statistics for fishery policy evaluation
Presenter(s): Matt Reimer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics, University of Alaska Anchorage
Date & Time: 8 February 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Matt Reimer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics, University of Alaska Anchorage

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky Krikelas at Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. WEBINAR Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 809 635 739 https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m5de78f759a29b11f50e0fdfa230450df Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 Need help joining? Contact Support ABSTRACT Fisheries economists are often tasked with evaluating the effects of past or future changes in management institutions. The standard approach for a retrospective policy evaluation uses the "experimental ideal" to focus on internal validity for evaluating the causal effect of a previously implemented policy. Such an approach, however, often comes at the cost of minimal external validity, and is typically not suited for forecasting the impacts of policy interventions that have not yet been implemented. Structural, or mechanistic, approaches have the potential to address issues of external validity and forecast the effects of a policy that has never been implemented. Unfortunately, many prospective policy evaluations rely on ex ante data and statistical relationships that cannot be expected to remain the same after a policy is implemented. In this talk, I will speak to the concept of "policy invariance," which is the key element for forecasting the effects of a policy intervention in new environments. Parameters that are policy invariant can be safely transported to new policy environments, and can be used to evaluate causal impacts of a range of hypothetical policies for which the parameters are invariant. Importantly, the emphasis is not on estimating causal parameters, but on estimating combinations of parameters that are expected to be invariant to the policies under consideration. I will illustrate the concept of policy invariance using an evaluation of the economic impacts associated with a large marine reserve for the protection of the endangered western stock of Steller sea lions in U.S. waters off the coast of Alaska. Using standard retrospective evaluation approaches, we find minimal evidence that closing the marine reserve to fishing had a significant economic cost for the industry. However, a more structural approach reveals that the marine reserve influences economic outcomes through multiple counteracting mechanisms, and suggests that the marine reserve could have been quite costly in different biological or institutional environments. Overall, this evaluation demonstrates the importance of identifying policy invariant parameters for forecasting the effects of policy interventions in new environments. Moreover, understanding underlying mechanisms can aid policy makers in designing policies that foster the mechanisms that achieve the intended policy objectives and mitigate the mechanisms that do not. BIO Matt Reimer is an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Social and Economic Research and the Department of Economics and Public Policy at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Matt teaches natural resource economics, methods for public policy evaluation, and industrial organization to economics students. His research focuses on policy evaluation for coupled natural and human systems, with an emphasis on understanding how institutions affect human behavior and the implications for managing natural resources. His recent research includes: predicting changes in fishing practices prompted by introducing new fishery policies; exploring the drivers of fishing community economies; assessing the economic impacts of marine protected areas; conducting field experiments to examine the role of institutions for small-scale fisheries management; and designing decision support tools for adaptive management of commercial and recreational fisheries. Matt also serves on the Science and Statistical Committee for the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council, which provides scientific advice to the Council on the policy and management decisions it must make.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 February 2018

Title: The Hurricanes of 2017: Weather as Usual or an Ominous Sign?
Presenter(s): Dr. Kerry Emanuel, Co-Director, Lorenz Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Date & Time: 13 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kerry Emanuel, Co-Director, Lorenz Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Presenting from Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
Hurricane Harvey, Irma and Maria each set some disturbing meteorological records and collectively did more than $300 billion in damage, more than half the total annual budget of the U.S. Department of Defense. Are these storms simply part of natural chaotic weather variability, or have they been affected by human-caused climate change? To answer these questions, we turn to the basic theory of hurricanes and novel way of estimating hurricane risk around the world and use these techniques to estimate how the underlying probabilities of events like Harvey, Irma, and Maria have changed and will continue to change over the course of this century, absent any measures to curtail greenhouse gas emissions. .

Bio(s):
Dr. Kerry Emanuel is the Cecil and Ida Green professor of atmospheric science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has been on the faculty since 1981,after spending three years on the faculty of UCLA. Professor Emanuel's researchinterests focus on tropical meteorology and climate, with a specialty in hurricane physics.His interests also include cumulus convection, and advanced methods of sampling the atmosphere in aid of numerical weather prediction. He is the author or co-author of over 200 peer-reviewed scientific papers, and three books, including Divine Wind: The History and Science of Hurricanes, published by Oxford University Press and aimed at a general audience, and What We Know about Climate Change, published by the MIT Press. He is a co-director of MIT's Lorenz Center, a climate think tank devoted to basic, curiosity- driven climate research.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

14 February 2018

Title: Transformative Mindset Change as a Precondition to Successful Reorganization: Part 1
Presenter(s): Dr. Pavel Hosa, MBA, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 14 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar or at NOAA,SSMC4, Rm 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Pavel Hosa, MBA, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Join the Adobe Connect meeting at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ Enter as a Guest! The audio for this seminar is only available thru the computer, not the phone, and there is no participant speaking enabled " participants can communicate in the chat. If you cannot hear the audio, you may need to turn up the volume on your computer audio. If you want to use a headset for the seminar, please have it plugged in BEFORE YOU LOGIN and select headset for your audio output prior to joining the meeting. If you still cannot hear, please open the link below and configure your audio. If you have never attended an Adobe Connect meeting before, test your ability to use Adobe Connect: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Abstract:
Traditionally, costly reorganizations do not lead to success. Only organizations and teams perfectly aligned with their external environments succeed in the 21st century. Dr. Pavel Hosa explains the transformative mindset change necessary now, and why it is crucial for any successful reorganization to succeed! He presents his transformative mindset change results based on the Theory U and MIT-guided research. This seminar is the first of a two-part series; the second seminar is being held on Feb. 28, 12-1pm ET. .

Bio(s):
As a special assistant of the Czech Secretary of Defense and former Czech president Vaclav Havel, Dr. Pavel Hosa supported the long-term reorganization of the Czech Republic's military. During that process, he worked with the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Air National Guard Commander. Pavel supported the Czech President during his seven official and closed-door negotiations with President Clinton, Defense Secretaries Rumsfeld and Cohen, and Secretary of State Albright. During his tour of duty at the Supreme Allied Headquarters Atlantic in Norfolk, VA, Pavel led a global team of 200+ international government-level managers, briefed President G. W. Bush on cultural and government personnel-related challenges associated with the NATO enlargement, and applied PhD-level analytic methodologies and principles and achieved significant operating costs savings and greater levels of innovation. Dr. Pavel Hosa has been trained by the U.S. Air Force and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in innovative thinking for success in the 21st century. He holds a Master's degree in management from the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, FL, and a doctoral degree in organization and management from the Capella University in Minneapolis, MN.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Process studies to quantify ecosystem dynamics and inform EBFM in the central California Current
Presenter(s): Brian Wells, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 14 February 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series:

Presenter(s):
Brian Wells, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Abstract:
Brian Wells will describe the large- and regional-scale environmental conditions of the Pacific Ocean Basin and California Current shelf ecosystem that relate to forage, Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), and seabird productivity in central California. This information can be used to parameterize ecosystem models and evaluate likely outcomes of ecosystem management options, including considerations of three fishery resources and recovering seabird populations.

Wells will put the work in the context of the EBFM priorities.

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the February EBM/EBFM seminar:

https://goo.gl/fddvsB

Bio(s):
Brian Wells has a research program in Ecosystem Oceanography at SWFSC. The focus of his group's work has been to evaluate how environmental variability relates to trophic structure within the California Current. The work can be applied to informing EBFM.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

15 February 2018

Title: Natural Shoreline Infrastructure: Working with Nature to Increase Coastal Resilience
Presenter(s): Jenna Judge, PhD, SF Bay and Outer Coast Sentinel Site Cooperative, NOAA
Date & Time: 15 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jenna Judge, PhD, San Francisco Bay and Outer Coast Sentinel Site Cooperative, NOAA. Presenting remotely from NOAA's Office of Coastal Management Office in Oakland, CA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
Sea level rise and erosion are major threats to California's coast, requiring solutions that preserve the many benefits of a natural coast that Californians enjoy: flood protection, recreation, habitat for wildlife, water quality, and more. Seawalls are commonly installed in an attempt to keep the shoreline in place and hold back the sea; however, they ultimately worsen impacts by increasing erosion along the seawall and the shoreline adjacent to it, causing already vulnerable beaches to shrink more. Natural shoreline infrastructure is an alternative that is more likely to preserve the benefits coastal ecosystems provide while also maintaining coastal access. The California coastline is heterogeneous and no single solution will address all of the challenges we anticipate in the future. Dr. Judge developed detailed case studies highlighting a range of approaches and offering lessons related to the design, permitting, implementation, and monitoring challenges encountered when pursuing nature-based solutions to climate-related coastal hazards.

Bio(s):
Dr. Jenna Judge coordinates the San Francisco Bay and Outer Coast Sentinel Site Cooperative, one of five NOAA Sentinel Site Cooperatives in the country, dedicated to improving both ecosystem and community resilience to rising sea levels, storms, and flooding events. Dr. Judge works with partners to develop resources for and advance dialogue between diverse stakeholder groups that are planning and implementing strategies for sea level rise adaptation. Judge received a bachelor's degree in aquatic biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and earned her doctorate in integrative biology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Shared socioeconomic pathways: what are they and how can they inform ecosystem management?
Presenter(s): Kristie Ebi, Ph.D. , Professor of Global Health and Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 15 February 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kristie Ebi, Ph.D. , Professor of Global Health and Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky Krikelas at Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. WEBINAR: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m5de78f759a29b11f50e0fdfa230450df Join Webex Meeting number and Access Code: 809 635 739 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 ABSTRACT The climate change research community developed a new framework for the creation and use of scenarios to improve interdisciplinary analysis and assessment of climate change, its impacts, and response options. This process includes a set of forcing pathways (the Representative Concentration Pathways or RCPs) that can be combined with alternative socioeconomic development pathways (Shared Socioeconomic Pathways or SSPs) to create a range of scenarios. The SSPs define the high-level evolution of human and natural societies over the 21st century through a narrative storyline and a set of quantified measures under the assumption of no significant climate feedback. One objective of the SSPs is to provide sufficient information and context for impacts, adaptation, and mitigation analyses. BIO Kristie L. Ebi is director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment (CHanGE), and Rohm and Haas Endowed Professor in Public Health Sciences at the University of Washington. She has been conducting research and practice on the health risks of climate variability and change for over twenty years, focusing on understanding sources of vulnerability, estimating current and future health risks of climate change, and designing adaptation policies and measures to reduce the risks of climate change in multi-stressor environments. She has supported multiple countries in Central America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific in assessing their vulnerability and implementing adaptation measures. As an author contributing to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 4th Assessment Report, she shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Mr. Gore. She has been an author on multiple national and international climate change assessments. She co-chairs the International Committee On New Integrated Climate change assessment Scenarios (ICONICS), facilitating development of new climate change scenarios. Dr. Ebi's scientific training includes an M.S. in toxicology and a Ph.D. and a Masters of Public Health in epidemiology, and two years of postgraduate research at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has edited fours books on aspects of climate change and has more than 200 publications. RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS Ebi, K. L., Kram, T., van Vuuren, D. P., O'Neill, B. C., & Kriegler, E. (2014). A new toolkit for developing scenarios for climate change research and policy analysis. Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development, 56(2), 6-16. O'Neill, B. C., Kriegler, E., Ebi, K. L., Kemp-Benedict, E., Riahi, K., Rothman, D. S., ... & Levy, M. (2017). The roads ahead: narratives for shared socioeconomic pathways describing world futures in the 21st century. Global Environmental Change 42, 169-180.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Seeing Nighttime Lights from Space and What They Tell Us About Humanity’s Tenure on Earth
Presenter(s): Dr. Miguel O. Roman, Research Physical Scientist, NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center
Date & Time: 15 February 2018
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC2, Room 17250
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Miguel O. Román, Research Physical Scientist, NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center

Sponsor(s):
Latinos@NOAA. POC Latinos@noaa.gov Webex Link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/493238141 Dial: +1 (312) 757-3129; Access Code: 493-238-141 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting; Meeting ID: 493-238-141

Abstract:
The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Human Planet Initiative is committed to the development of state-of-the-art products that provide new scientific evidence and a comprehensive understanding of the human presence on the Planet. The initiative relies on a core set of partners, which coordinate the development and evaluation of global human settlement baseline measurements. In this context, NASA recently announced the formation of a cross-cutting activity under the auspices of GEO Human Planet. The Nighttime Product Validation task (NPV) is dedicated to the uncertainty assessment of global nighttime environmental products through validation " the process of comparing satellite-derived products to independent reference data. The NPV task, along with other GEO Work Programme projects announced during the GEO XIV Plenary, broadens the involvement in GEO Human Planet by U.S. organizations, adding their expertise and contributions to realize societal benefits from Earth observations. This seminar will provide an overview of GEO Human Planet activities supported by NASA's Black Marble science team; highlighting areas of progress related to urban sustainability, disaster response, and human well-being; as well as other GEO-led efforts tied to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Miguel O. Román (WaPo Profile; Google Scholar Profile) is a research physical scientist in the Terrestrial Information Systems Laboratory at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. He is the principal NASA scientist for the VIIRS Day/Night Band on Suomi-NPP and oversees the development of NASA's Black Marble product suite. He has been PI on over $4 million of external funding for the development and use of operational products from MODIS and VIIRS. At the agency level, Román serves as part of NASA's Disasters Response Program; working directly with technical and program staff from 6 NASA centers and JPL. The program targets a wide spectrum of disasters and is tasked with representing the Agency during national and international emergencies where NASA satellite data and products can be used to improve situational awareness and inform decision making. At the international level, Dr. Román serves as an officer to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Working Group on Calibration and Validation (WGCV), and as the Chair of the CEOS Land Product Validation (LPV) subgroup. Román is also leading international efforts, under the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Human Planet Initiative, which are committed to the development and evaluation of state-of-the-art nighttime lights products that provide new scientific evidence and a comprehensive understanding of the human presence on the Planet. Román is a senior member of IEEE, and an active member of the American Geophysical Union. He is a recent recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 February 2018

Title: Nonlinear Wave Ensemble Averaging using Neural Networks
Presenter(s): Ricardo Compos, UMD
Date & Time: 20 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction,Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Ricardo Campos (UMD visiting scientist)

Title:
Nonlinear Wave Ensemble Averaging using Neural Networks Date,Time, Room: Tuesday February 20, 2018 at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155 Contact: Michiko Masutani Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:
This lecture presents results of a GWES assessment using NDBC buoys, studying the errors of 10-m wind speed (U10m), significant wave height (Hs), and peak period (Tp), in function of forecast range and severity (percentiles). Then it focuses on a large experiment using neural networks (NN) applied to nonlinear ensemble averages. First, using a single location approach, considering two buoys in the Pacific and the Atlantic Ocean. Then moving to a spatial approach at the Gulf of Mexico. The NN simulates the residue of the ensemble mean, i.e., the difference from the arithmetic mean of the ensemble members to the buoy observations. The sensitivity NN test considered a total of 12 different numbers of neurons, 8 different filtering windows (residue), and 100 seeds for the random initialization. Independent NN models have been constructed for specific forecast days, from Day 0 to Day 10. Results show that a small number of neurons are sufficient to reduce the bias, while 35 to 50 neurons are optimum to reduce both the scatter and average errors. More complex NN models with a higher number of neurons presented worse results. Finally, a comparison showed significant improvements of the best neural network models (NNs) compared to the traditional arithmetic ensemble mean (EM). The correlation coefficient for forecast Day 10, for example, was increased from 0.39 to 0.61 for U10m, from 0.50 to 0.76 for Hs, and from 0.38 to 0.63 for Tp. This is part of the project: "Improving Global Wind-Wave Probabilistic Forecasts and Products Beyond Week 2" Award Number: NA16NWS4680011 Steve Penny, Jose-Henrique Alves, Vladimir Krasnopolsky, and Ricardo Martins Campos. ====== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The Value of Coastal Wetlands in Reducing Flood Losses from Storms: Case-studies from the US Atlantic Coastline and Elsewhere
Presenter(s): Siddharth Narayan, Research Scientist, presenting remotely from the University of California Santa Cruz
Date & Time: 20 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Authors: Siddharth Narayan, Research Scientist, presenting remotely from the University of California Santa Cruz. Co-authors include Michael W. Beck, Christopher Thomas, Christine C. Shepard, Paul Wilson, Inigo J. Losada, Guillermo Franco, Borja Reguero, Dania Trespalacios, and Carter J. Ingram.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
There is increasing interest these days around natural and nature-based features, such as coastal wetlands, for reducing risk. This interest spans not just the public sector (NOAA, US Army Corps of Engineers) but also the private sector (risk financing, engineering industries). A corpus of work over the last few decades shows that coastal wetlands can and do help reduce flood damages. Translating this knowledge into practical, on-the-ground measures for conservation and risk management, requires a multi-pronged effort by conservationists, engineers and academia. Key to this effort is using industry-standard tools that allow engineers and risk financers to readily measure, finance and, ultimately, implement these ‘novel' features. In this seminar Dr. Sid Narayan will discuss some of their recent work on measuring the value of coastal wetlands for reducing flood losses from storms, done in close partnership with private insurance, financial, and academic institutions. He will explore some of the main challenges and opportunities that arise out of this work for conservation and risk reduction practice.

Bio(s):
Dr. Siddharth Narayan is a coastal engineer, currently working as a research scientist at the University of California Santa Cruz. Sid is from Chennai in South India, where he earned his bachelor's degree in civil engineering. He subsequently received a master's in Coastal Engineering at TU Delft in The Netherlands, and a PhD in coastal flood risk assessments at the University of Southampton in the UK. For the past four years, Sid's research, together with Michael Beck of The Nature Conservancy, have focused on assessments, approaches and tools to understand how, where and when conserving ecosystems can benefit people and nature. At present, he works with a team of ecologists, coastal engineers and risk modelers to assess the role and value of ecosystems for coastal risk reduction and resilience.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NOAA Institutional Repository Seminar: 508 Compliance
Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS; Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 20 February 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, https://goo.gl/KNPTTT, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS and Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/KNPTTT After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). Each seminar will be on a topic related to the NOAA IR and these seminars will occur bimonthly Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of NOAA IR seminars. POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter judith.salter@noaa.gov; IR Managing Librarian: Jennifer Fagan-Fry (jennifer.fagan-fry@noaa.gov); Sr. Bibliometrics Librarian: Sarah Davis (sarah.davis@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Welcome to NOAA's Institutional Repository Seminar Series! Each bimonthly NOAA IR seminar will be on a topic related to the NOAA IR. Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. February 2018's topic is Section 508 Compliance. NOAA's Institutional Repository (NOAA IR) provides long-term public access to NOAA publications and articles. Join us in the library to learn more about recent developments in the NOAA IR and with the submission process as well as information about Section 508 compliance. A Q&A session will follow the presentation.

Bio(s):
Jennifer Fagan-Fry received her MLIS from Catholic University and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2015. Jenn manages the NOAA Institutional Repository, provides cataloging/metadata services and works with the library website. Sarah Davis received her M.L.S from the University of Maryland and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2008. She heads the bibliometrics team and also works with the NOAA Institutional Repository and the library website.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 February 2018

Title: Subseasonal to Seasonal Prediction: Research Efforts and Broader Perspective
Presenter(s): Elizabeth Barnes, Colorado State University, Ben Kirtman, University of Miami, Michael Rixen, World Climate Research Program, Andrew Robertson, Columbia University, Paolo Ruti, World Meteorological Organization, Michael Ventrice, The Weather Company
Date & Time: 21 February 2018
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 OAR CPO Fishbowl Room 12871 and Online Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Elizabeth Barnes (Colorado State University), Ben Kirtman (University of Miami), Michael Rixen (World Climate Research Program), Andrew Robertson (Columbia University), Paolo Ruti (World Meteorological Organization), Michael Ventrice (The Weather Company)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR/CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program Seminar POC: Daniel.Barrie@noaa.gov REMOTE ACCESS INFORMATION: - Link: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e043d633772298071cf86dc829e5e39ad - Passcode: 20910 - For audio: After logging on to WebEx, click "I will call in" (to hear audio via phone). Make sure to enter both the access code and attendee ID #. If you do not see the option "I will call in," click the "Quick Start" tab in WebEx, and you'll see the option.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Allisions, Collisions and Groundings: The Impact of the Physical Oceanographic Real Time System (PORTS®) on Accident Reduction
Presenter(s): s):
K. Eric Wolfe, Chief Economist, Office of the Associate Administrator, National Ocean Service, NOAA. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.
Date & Time: 21 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
K. Eric Wolfe, Chief Economist, Office of the Associate Administrator, National Ocean Service, NOAA. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
Reductions in the rates of domestic allisions, collisions and groundings (ACGs) are the result of technological advances as well as implementation of best practices in the maritime industry. This study investigated long-term gross benefits derived from expanded implementation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS®) with respect to reductions in ACG rates in the United States. Following PORTS® installations that provided expanded coverage of U.S. ports and adjoining areas, concomitant decreases in accident rates occurred. While previous estimates suggested that between twenty and sixty percent of grounding accident reductions were due to PORTS®, current research suggests that between 44 and 51 percent of ACG rate reductions were due to such installations. Annual gross benefits resulting from lowered ACG rates PORTS® locations installed through 2016 were estimated to approach $29 million. Over the estimated ten-year economic life of PORTS® instruments, present PORTS® installations could produce a present value saving of $180 million. If expanded to an additional 23 ports where economic justification might be made, up to $10 million could be saved. Over ten years this would equate to over $84 million.

Bio(s):
K. Eric Wolfe is the chief economist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Ocean Service. He was a senior executive at the Association of American Railroads where he managed industry interline revenue and financial clearinghouse operations, operations and reference file data, as well as the Surface Transportation Board's Carload Waybill Sample from 1983 to 1999. He also served as a senior executive at the American Trucking Associations and as a Certified Financial Planner. Wolfe earned his Master of Science degree in economics from the University of Maryland. He has served as co-general and associate editor of the Journal of the Transportation Research Forum (JTRF) and has published several research articles on the transportation industry. His research has appeared in such journals as Transportation Journal, Traffic Quarterly, Journal of Leisure Research, JTRF, Journal of Ocean and Coastal Economics.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/ (

Presente
Title: Virtual Dives into America's Underwater Treasures
Presenter(s): Mitchell Tartt, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 21 February 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Remote
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mitchell Tartt, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8480734782159289859


Abstract:
Immerse yourself in the ocean and your national marine sanctuaries without getting wet! These Virtual Reality (VR) voyages use 360-degree images to highlight the amazing habitats, animals, and cultural resources you can find in each national marine sanctuary. Learn more about VR technology and dive into our underwater treasures using your desktop or mobile devices. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 February 2018

Title: Natural Hazard Mitigation Saves: 2017 Interim Report
Presenter(s): Philip Schneider, National Institute of Building Sciences
Date & Time: 22 February 2018
11:00 am - 12:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, SSMC-3, 2nd Floor, or via webinar https://goo.gl/PUJwUc, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Philip Schneider is the Director of the Building Seismic Safety Council, Director of the Multihazard Mitigation Council and Director of the buildingSMART alliance®.

POC: Denna Geppi, Risk Communication Lead Social Scientist, NOAA PRSS; Judith Salter, Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Natural Hazard Mitigation Saves

Remote Access:
https://goo.gl/PUJwUc After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
More than a decade after releasing its original report on mitigation, the National Institute of Building Sciences issued Natural Hazard Mitigation Saves: 2017 Interim Report. The 2017 Interim Report highlights the benefits of two mitigation strategies.The Institute's project team looked at the results of 23 years of federally funded mitigation grants provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and found mitigation funding can save the nation $6 in future disaster costs, for every $1 spent on hazard mitigation.In addition, the project team looked at scenarios that focus on designing new buildings to exceed provisions of the 2015 model building codes. The 2017 Interim Report demonstrates that investing in hazard mitigation measures to exceed select requirements of the 2015 International Codes (I-Codes), the model building codes developed by the International Code Council (ICC), can save the nation $4 for every $1 spent.The project team estimated that just implementing these two sets of mitigation strategies would prevent 600 deaths, 1 million nonfatal injuries and 4,000 cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the long term. In addition, designing new buildings to exceed the 2015 International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) would result in 87,000 new, long-term jobs and an approximate 1% increase in utilization of domestically produced construction material.Sponsors of the report include FEMA, HUD, EDA, ICC, the Insurance Institute for Business & Home
Safety (IBHS), the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

Bio(s):
Philip Schneider is the Director of the Building Seismic Safety Council, Director of the Multihazard Mitigation Council and Director of the buildingSMART alliance®.Subscribe to theOneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Citizen Science Benefits Coral Reef Restoration
Presenter(s): Dalton Hesley, Research Associate, University of Miami RSMAS Presenting remotely
Date & Time: 22 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dalton Hesley, Research Associate, University of Miami RSMAS. Presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.

Abstract:
The abundance of corals has declined significantly over past decades, to the point where several reef-building species in the Caribbean are now listed as threatened. Active reef restoration has expanded exponentially to help recover degraded coral populations and the ecological services they provide. While restoration practitioners now grow hundreds of coral genotypes from several species within coral nurseries and outplant thousands onto degraded reefs annually, the cost of these activities continues to be a limiting factor. We describe a citizen science program, Rescue a Reef (RAR), which trains participants in reef restoration and provides unique experiential learning opportunities to recover degraded coral reefs. Between 2015-2017, 230 participants outplanted >1,300 staghorn corals, showing that citizen scientists significantly contribute to reef restoration. Most importantly, corals outplanted by RAR participants showed the same survivorship as those outplanted by scientific experts. The direct benefits of using citizen scientists for restoration are enhanced when the educational opportunities offered by these expeditions are considered. Results from our survey showed significant improvements in coral reef ecology and restoration knowledge for RAR participants.

Bio(s):
Dalton Hesley is a University of Miami (UM) graduate, earning his Master of Professional Science in Marine Biology and Ecology. Before that, he received his B.S. degree in Biology from the University of Minnesota-Duluth. Currently, he works as a Research Associate in Dr. Diego Lirman's Benthic Ecology laboratory at UM while also managing their Rescue a Reef program, a citizen science project aimed at supporting coral reef research and restoration through community education and engagement. His main areas of focus are marine ecosystem management as well as coral reef conservation. He hopes to continue working to restore the future of our coral reefs.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Optimizing Green Stormwater Infrastructure for People and Nature: Advancing Urban Stormwater Planning through Design Thinking, Pollution Loading, and Social Equity Metrics
Presenter(s): Emily Howe, Ph.D. , Aquatic Ecologist, The Nature Conservancy
Date & Time: 22 February 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online and at NWFSC
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Emily Howe, Ph.D. , Aquatic Ecologist, The Nature Conservancy

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky Krikelas at Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov. WEBINAR Join Webex :https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m5de78f759a29b11f50e0fdfa230450df Meeting number and Access Code: 809 635 739 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 ABSTRACT Although urban stormwater pollution is a widely recognized threat to coastal cities and ecosystems, stormwater retrofit planning, especially green stormwater infrastructure (GSI), remains an opportunistic, locally-focused endeavor as opposed to an efficiently optimized planning process. We are developing a decision support/prioritization tool for the Puget Sound region that estimates pollutant loads, GSI performance modeling, and other factors to assist decision makers on making better informed GSI investment decisions. Wide scale adoption and geographic expansion of tools such as this one can allow better prioritization of stormwater investments and lead to more rapid recovery of the Puget Sound ecosystem. We utilized Design Thinking to deepen our understanding of stormwater managers' current decision-making processes, and to outline a distribution of needs and barriers within the stormwater community of practice for using GSI. We found that GSI/BMP investments are made with little consideration of watershed-wide implications, cumulative effects, pollution loading, or environmental justice issues, leading to continued ecosystem and community degradation. The developing tool utilizes pollutant loading information from local urban runoff and BMP monitoring programs, the International BMP Database, and peer-reviewed literature to develop customized GIS layers via an online interface. It assigns loading information to parcels based on landuse and imperviousness to calculate average annual pollutant loadings for nine common urban stormwater pollutants. From this, the tool produces pollutant loading “heatmaps” that identify the estimated contribution of stormwater pollutants at a sub-neighborhood level. These heatmaps can be used on their own to identify hotspots, or can be utilized by the tool's decision support framework to decide on infrastructure investments. Other information used to support the decision framework include locations of/proximity to fish bearing streams, 303d listings, and social justice demographics. These data are then coupled with a multi-criteria decision analysis module to identify optimal locations and GSI/BMP types for investments. We intend for the tool to be used by a variety of audiences including the public, stormwater managers, municipal decision makers, and industry. BIO Emily Howe is an aquatic ecologist at The Nature Conservancy of Washington. She works with TNC's cities, land, and water programs. She holds an M.S. (2006) and a Ph.D. (2012) from the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington, with a focus on estuarine restoration and food web ecology in tidally-influenced ecosystems. Emily's work integrates across ecosystem boundaries, investigating how landscape configuration and management shapes cross-boundary relationships for food webs, organisms, and ecosystem processes. She is currently working at the nexus of stormwater pollution, green infrastructure, and freshwater and marine restoration ecology.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 February 2018

Title: A Multisatellite Layered Precipitable Water Vapor Product for Forecasting and Model Comparison.
Presenter(s): John Forsythe, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere - CIRA, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
Date & Time: 26 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Bldg, 7700 Hubble Drive, Lanham MD 20771, Conference Room S561
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
John Forsythe, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO

Sponsor(s):
Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) December Science Seminar POC for questions: Dr. Mitch Goldberg (mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov) Webex JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m853c72c76d5f03ee3c30946f5b3c3af4 Meeting number: 747 284 455 Host key: 429249 Meeting password: Jpss2018

Abstract:
Forecasters have been using the NOAA operational blended total precipitable water (TPW) product, developed by the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), since 2009. New blending techniques using the increased spatial and temporal resolution of GOES-16 data are expected to improve the depiction of TPW, especially over land. Advective blending, using model winds to advect the product to synoptic times, achieves a more useful product for forecasters. Blended TPW conveys no information on the vertical distribution of moisture, which is relevant to a variety of forecast concerns. A blended seven-satellite, four-layer,layered precipitable water (LPW) product allows forecasters to see the vertical distribution of water vapor in near real-time. Blended LPW is created by using NOAA investments in polar orbiting satellite sounding retrievals from passive microwave radiances, in particular,the Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS). Data from the Suomi-NPP, NOAA-18 and -19,Metop-A and "B, and Defense Meteorological Program (DMSP) F17 and F18spacecraft are merged to create the LPW product. The NOAA JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction program supports the development of advanced blending algorithms and the distribution of the product to NOAA national centers. Examples of forecast usage of the total and advected layered precipitable water productswill be presented, along with model water vapor comparisons. Interactions with the National HurricaneCenter (NHC) and the Weather Prediction Center (WPC) will be discussed.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Hurricane Analysis and Forecasting at the National Hurricane Center: Past, Present and Future
Presenter(s): Dr. Chris Landsea, NOAA NWS National Hurricane Center
Date & Time: 26 February 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA SMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817, SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 4817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Chris Landsea, NOAA NWS National Hurricane Center

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NESDIS NCEI, POC: Hernan Garcia (Hernan.Garcia@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Phone: 1-877-725-4068 (8634769#). For Webcast access go to http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=744868915&p=science&t=c

Abstract:
The National Hurricane Center issues analyses, forecasts, and warnings over large parts of the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and in support of many nearby countries. Advances in observational capabilities, operational numerical weather prediction, and forecaster tools and support systems over the past 15"20 yr have enabled the center to make more accurate forecasts, extend forecast lead times, and provide new products and services. Important limitations, however, persist. This paper discusses the current workings and state of the nation's hurricane warning program, and highlights recent improvements and the enabling science and technology. It concludes with a look ahead at opportunities to address challenges.

Bio(s):
I am the Science and Operations Officer at NOAA's National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami. In addition to forecasting and training duties, I am responsible for administration and evaluation of Joint Hurricane Testbed projects which may be implemented operationally to assist in the monitoring and forecasting of hurricane. I received my Bachelor's Degree in Atmospheric Science from the University of California Los Angeles (1987) and my Master's Degree and Doctorate in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University (1991, 1994). Power point: https://drive.google.com/a/noaa.gov/file/d/1y-ZSPfH43N2BKfOOa9oeBkgZjPD-jMg-/view?usp=drive_web

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Pacific Northwest Water Year: Keeping a Watchful Eye on Snowpack
Presenter(s): s):
Karin Bumbacco, Washington Assistant State Climatologist, Dave Miskus, NOAA Climate Prediction Center, Justin Huntington, Western Regional Climate Center/Desert Research Institute, Claire Phillips, US Department of Agriculture
Date & Time: 26 February 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Karin Bumbacco, Washington Assistant State Climatologist, Dave Miskus, NOAA Climate Prediction Center, Justin Huntington, Western Regional Climate Center/Desert Research Institute, Claire Phillips, US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) Seminar POC for questions: britt.parker@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2883116688429604867 TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO: When the Webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. --OR-- TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE: If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below. United States: +1 (631) 992-3221 Access Code: 715-819-787 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar

Abstract:
The NIDIS Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (PNW DEWS) February 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars that provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. The agenda for this month's webinar will include a drought & climate status update and outlook, and presentations of Climate Engine and the Biochar Atlas. There will be a Q&A session following the presentations. Winter Snowpack: Snowpack numbers for mountains across much of Oregon and southwestern Idaho looked pretty dismal as of January 31, 2018 release of The Climate CIRCulator. However, snowpack in other portions of our region aren't looking all that bad. This year's snowpack is a story of haves and have-nots. https://climatecirculatororg.wordpress.com/2018/01/31/winter-snowpack-numbers/ Climate Engine: Free, web-based application that uses the Google Earth engine to enable users to analyze and interact with climate and earth observations for decision support related to drought, water use, agriculture, wildfire and ecology. http://climateengine.org Pacific Northwest Biochar Atlas: A growing body of evidence suggests that biochars can provide “win-win-win” solutions to sustain rural livelihoods, preserve natural ecosystems, and adapt to climate variability. Biochar is a soil amendment that is produced when organic waste material is partially combusted in the presence of limited oxygen. http://www.pnwbiochar.org/

Bio(s):
Karin Bumbaco is a climatologist at the Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean at the University of Washington. The majority of Karin's time is spent as the Assistant State Climatologist for the Office of the Washington State Climatologist. Her research focuses on WA weather and climate, and includes projects on historical heat events, optimal network design, and recent droughts. David Miskus is a Meteorologist at the NOAA Climate Prediction Center, serving as the Operational Drought Monitoring & Forecasting Lead and liaison for the USDA Joint Agricultural Weather Facility (JAWF). Justin Huntington is an Associate Research Professor of Hydrology at the Desert Research Institute and Western Regional Climate Center in Reno, Nevada. His research interests are focused on surface energy balance measurement and modeling, surface and groundwater interactions, drought, and agriculture. Claire Phillips is Research Soil Scientist at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Forage Seed and Cereal Research Center. Her research interests include soil respiration, ecosystem respiration, tower fluxes, and soil biogeochemistry.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. (

Presente

28 February 2018

Title: Transformative Mindset Change as a Precondition to Successful Reorganization: Part 2
Presenter(s): Dr. Pavel Hosa, MBA, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 28 February 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via Webinar or at NOAA,SSMC4, Rm 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Pavel Hosa, MBA, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Join the Adobe Connect meeting at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/nosscienceseminars/ The audio for this seminar is only available thru the computer, not the phone, and there is no participant speaking enabled " participants can type into the chat. If you cannot hear the audio, you may need to turn up the volume on your computer audio. If you want to use a headset for the seminar, please have it plugged in and selected for your audio prior to joining the meeting. If you still cannot hear anything, please open the link below and configure your audio. If you have never attended an Adobe Connect meeting before, test your ability to use Adobe Connect: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Abstract:
Traditionally, costly reorganizations do not lead to success. Only organizations and teams perfectly aligned with their external environments succeed in the 21st century. Dr. Pavel Hosa explains the transformative mindset change necessary now, and why it is crucial for any successful reorganization to succeed! He presents his transformative mindset change results based on the Theory U and MIT-guided research. This seminar is the second of a two-part series; the first seminar was held on Feb. 14, 12-1pm ET. .

Bio(s):
As a special assistant of the Czech Secretary of Defense and former Czech president Vaclav Havel, Dr. Pavel Hosa supported the long-term reorganization of the Czech Republic's military. During that process, he worked with the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Air National Guard Commander. Pavel supported the Czech President during his seven official and closed-door negotiations with President Clinton, Defense Secretaries Rumsfeld and Cohen, and Secretary of State Albright. During his tour of duty at the Supreme Allied Headquarters Atlantic in Norfolk, VA, Pavel led a global team of 200+ international government-level managers, briefed President G. W. Bush on cultural and government personnel-related challenges associated with the NATO enlargement, and applied PhD-level analytic methodologies and principles and achieved significant operating costs savings and greater levels of innovation. Dr. Pavel Hosa has been trained by the U.S. Air Force and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in innovative thinking for success in the 21st century. He holds a Master's degree in management from the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, FL, and doctoral degree in organization and management from the Capella University in Minneapolis, MN.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The Role of Environmental Monitoring and Data Management in Supporting Science to Inform Decision Making: Integrating Coastal and Ocean Monitoring Programs to Address Societal Needs
Presenter(s): Dr. Dwayne Porter, Centralized Data Management Office, National Estuarine Research Reserve System, Baruch Marine Lab, University of South Carolina
Date & Time: 28 February 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Dwayne Porter, Centralized Data Management Office, National Estuarine Research Reserve System, Baruch Marine Lab, University of South Carolina) Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar Seminar Points of Contact: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.edu

Remote Access:
Please register through GoToWebinar https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4463065420028382978

Abstract:
A goal of NOAA's National Ocean Service is to increase coastal intelligence with a commitment to integrating scientifically-defensible data, models, and decision-support tools to improve the ability of decision makers scaling from federal agencies to the private individual. Implementation and maintenance of robust data management and communications infrastructures are critical challenges for development of successful collaborative scientific and management initiatives. The development of the data and information management components of coastal and ocean observing system initiatives must address both core and cooperating programs' data and information exchange while meeting the needs of the end users. This webinar will provide an overview of the necessity for and benefits of a sound data management program. Examples will be provided to illustrate instances where management decisions have benefited from decision support tools that make use of data integrated across multiple coastal and ocean monitoring programs. See Project Factsheet: Data Management for the NERRS: http://graham.umich.edu/media/files/NSC-Data-Management.pdf

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

1 March 2018

Title: Kissing Coral: Measuring coral metabolic rates in situ with a novel diver-portable underwater respirometer - CISME
Presenter(s): Dr. Alina M. Szmant, Retired Professor, Adjunct Professor, enter for Marine Science, University of North Carolina Wilmington, presenting from Wilmington, NC. Co-author, co-developer: Dr. Robert F. Whitehead, Research Specialist, Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Date & Time: 1 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Alina M. Szmant, Retired Professor, Adjunct Professor, Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina Wilmington, presenting from Wilmington, NC. Co-author, co-developer: Dr. Robert F. Whitehead, Research Specialist, Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina Wilmington.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is available only over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary app works fine.

Abstract:
CISME is a new tool that was developed to non-destructively measure coral and algal bioenergetics in situ. Such a tool facilitates research and monitoring of corals and similar benthic organisms affected by ocean acidification, global warming, and other anthropogenic disturbances. CISME is deployed over the organism of interest, and held in place by locking retractors. A foam layer at the bottom of the sensor package seals CISME against the coral, and isolates a small volume of seawater for the incubation. Changes over time in dissolved oxygen (O2, measured with a PreSens optode), and pH (measured with a Honeywell Durafet electrode) in the incubation seawater are used to calculate rates of respiration (R) and photosynthesis (P). A sample port is used to withdraw water samples for discrete analyses such as total alkalinity used to calculate calcification rates, and can also be used to introduce experimental reagents (e.g. metabolic inhibitors, CO2 enriched seawater). The instrument can be deployed over coral species with fairly smooth surface structure, as well as benthic reef organisms such as algal turf, coralline algae and macroalgae. Field tests show that CISME can produce quick, consistent and non-destructive (to the coral) measurements of R (5 minutes), P (5-10 minutes), P vs I (irradiance) response curves (30-40 minutes), and calcification rates (G; 15-20 minutes) on corals and reef algae in their natural environment. Among the technical innovations of CISME is control of the instrument by an underwater tablet connected by WiFi which displays a real-time strip chart of the run so that the investigator can see the incubation trend in real time. CISME was used to measure seasonal changes in the metabolic rates of 40 tagged colonies of the Caribbean coral Orbicella faveolata on two coral reefs in La Parguera, PR. Measurements were repeated 4 times over an annual cycle. Results show elevated R during late summer, but no change in P, and thus lower P/R ratios during the late summer. P, CA and P/R ratios were ≥ than published laboratory measured rates, suggesting that in situ conditions were better than those provided in land-based seawater systems. CISME represents a valuable new technology that will help expand the scope of in situ physiological ecology research.

Bio(s):
Dr. Alina Szmant is among the pioneers in the study of the physiology, reproduction and larval biology of Caribbean reef corals. Other areas of expertise include nutrition and skeletogenesis of reef corals, ecological interactions central to coral reef function, and nutrient dynamics of coral reef ecosystems. Her current research is focused on the development and commercialization of a new diver portable respirometer to measure the ‘vital signs' of corals in their natural environment. She remains active in conservation issues regarding coral reefs, particularly with regard to the impact of climate change. She was a member of the Scientific Technical Advisory Committee to the Water Quality Plan for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary from 1994 to 2004, and has participated in numerous regional, national and international workshops organized to consider nutrients and other environmental issues affecting coral reef ecosystems. Before joining UNCW in 1999, Szmant was a Professor of Marine Biology at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science from 1983 to 1999, a research faculty at Florida State University and on the staff of the University of Puerto Rico and the Puerto Rico Nuclear Center. She obtained a B.S. in Biology from the University of Puerto Rico in 1966, a M.S. in Marine Biology from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1970, and a Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island in 1980. She was a member of the first all-female team of aquanauts to conduct scientific research in an underwater habitat, during the Tektite II Program in 1970. Dr. Robert Whitehead is a research specialist at UNCW. His PhD is in Chemical Oceanography, and at UNCW he has developed and optimized techniques and equipment for measuring seawater chemical parameters. These efforts have culminated in the development of the hardware and software components at the heart of CISME.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Valuing Nature for Coastal Risk Reduction: It's Not All About the $$$
Presenter(s): Katie Arkema, Ph.D. , Lead Scientist, The Natural Capital Project
Date & Time: 1 March 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Katie Arkema, Ph.D. , Lead Scientist, The Natural Capital Project Seminar sponsor: For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky Krikelas at Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:
https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m5de78f759a29b11f50e0fdfa230450df Meeting number and Access Code: 809 635 739 Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207 ABSTRACT Globally, extreme weather, sea-level rise, and degraded ecosystems are placing people and infrastructure at greater risk of damages from coastal hazards. Flooding and erosion may be reduced by intact reefs and vegetation when these habitats fringe vulnerable communities. Yet the magnitude and nature of these effects are highly context dependent, making it difficult to know under what conditions ecosystems are likely to be effective for saving lives and protecting property. I am addressing this challenge by developing approaches that link social, ecological, and physical processes to value ecosystems for coastal risk reduction in both monetary and social vulnerability metrics. My talk will share examples in which my research has informed coastal management and sustainable development in the US and Caribbean. I will end with some ideas about future work that aims to explore issues of equity in risk reduction and climate adaptation. BIO As lead scientist at the Natural Capital Project, Katie spearheads several efforts around the world to develop and use science about how nature benefits people to inform problems humans face in managing coastal and marine ecosystems. Katie is particularly interested in the ability of coastal ecosystems to protect vulnerable communities from sea level rise and storms, while providing other services such as nursery habitat for fish and opportunities for tourism and recreation. Her research is informing national development planning, climate adaptation, and investments in restoration and conservation in the United States, Latin America, the Caribbean and Africa. Katie received her Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara and her B.A. in ecology with a minor in Latin American studies from Princeton University. She is a recent recipient of a Fulbright NEXUS scholarship.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Introduction to some NOAA Satellites and their Data Products through Science on a Sphere
Presenter(s): Walter Smith, NOAA NESDIS
Date & Time: 1 March 2018
3:15 pm - 3:45 pm ET
Location: NOAA,SSMC3 Science on a Sphere (Plaza Level)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Walter Smith, NOAA NESDIS

Sponsor(s):
Science on a Sphere (SOS) POC: katherine.hawley@noaa.gov No remote access available

Abstract:
A brief introduction to Science on a Sphere (SOS) and its relationship to the NOAA GOES and POES satellites, with some SOS visualizations of NOAA satellite data products and their use in research and forecasting ocean and atmosphere phenomena.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Chasing Coral Bleaching Around the SoS
Presenter(s): Mark Eakin, NOAA NESDIS
Date & Time: 1 March 2018
3:50 pm - 4:20 pm ET
Location: NOAA,SSMC3 Science on a Sphere (Plaza Level)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mark Eakin, NOAA NESDIS

Sponsor(s):
Science on a Sphere (SOS) POC: katherine.hawley@noaa.gov No remote access available

Abstract:
Dr. Mark Eakin, Coordinator of NOAA's Coral Reef Watch will use the SoS to discuss explain the problem of coral bleaching, how it is killing corals around the world, and how satellites and climate models allow NOAA to monitor and forecast these events for the benefit of resource managers around the world.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 March 2018

Title: Pacific salmon in hot water: past, present and future of thermal diversity in rivers
Presenter(s): Aimee H. Fullerton, PhD., NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle WA. Presenting from Seattle
Date & Time: 6 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Aimee H. Fullerton, PhD., NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center Seattle WA. Presenting from Seattle.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
Water temperature is an increasing concern in Pacific Northwest rivers, where climate change is expected to negatively influence coldwater species. Novel methods for monitoring and modeling thermal regimes across river networks have made it possible to envision thermal diversity over space and time. However, understanding effects of thermal patterns on stream biota remains challenging. An important first step towards protecting and restoring functional thermal habitats is to quantify key aspects of a thermal regime that are important during each life stage. For example, adult Pacific salmon may suffer increased mortality and reduced fecundity if exposed to high temperatures during their migration to spawning grounds in the summer and fall. Watershed managers can characterize availability of cold-water refuges during this critical period and predict how conditions may change in the future. Thermal habitat is also important in winter when eggs are incubating in the gravel. Changes in winter thermal regimes, such as increases in minima and variability, may alter hatch timing and growth opportunity during early life stages that could have cascading consequences for later life stages. In this presentation, I provide an overview of these concepts and highlight new quantitative tools for assessing and managing thermal landscapes.

Bio(s):
Aimee joined NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center in 2002. She received her Ph.D. in Landscape Ecology from the University of Washington, her M.S. in Aquatic Ecology from the University of Notre Dame, and her B.S. in Biology from the Ohio State University. Her research interests include thermal diversity in streams and the effect of climate change on Pacific salmon and aquatic systems; the spatial structure of aquatic populations, especially those living in stream networks; the relationship between spatiotemporal scale and ecological patterns and processes; the influence of nonindigenous species on native aquatic fauna; and ways that science can contribute to improved decision-making.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

7 March 2018

Title: Moved to 3/21: Risk Factors for Seabird Bycatch in the Hawaii Pelagic Longline Tuna Fishery
Presenter(s): Eric Gilman, Tuna Program, The Nature Conservancy, Co-authors include: Milani Chaloupka, Ecological Modeling Services and University of Queens, and John Peschon and Sarah Ellgen, both with NOAA NMFS PIRO
Date & Time: 7 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OnenOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Eric Gilman, Tuna Program, The Nature Conservancy. Co-authors include: Milani Chaloupka, Ecological Modeling Services and University of Queens, and John Peschon and Sarah Ellgen, both with NOAA/NMFS/PIRO

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
TBD - check back a few days before the seminar

Abstract:
Capture in global pelagic longline fisheries threatens the viability of some seabird populations. The Hawaii longline tuna fishery annually catches hundreds of seabirds, primarily Laysan (Phoebastria immutabilis) and black-footed (P. nigripes) albatrosses. Since seabird regulations were introduced in 2001, the seabird catch rate has declined 74%. However, over the past decade, seabird catch levels significantly increased due to significant increasing trends in both effort and nominal seabird catch rates. We modelled observer data using a spatio-temporal generalized additive mixed model with zero-inflated Poisson likelihood to determine the significance of the effect of various risk factors on the seabird catch rate. The seabird catch rate significantly increased as annual mean multivariate ENSO index values increased, suggesting that decreasing ocean productivity observed in recent years in the central north Pacific may have contributed to the increasing trend in nominal seabird catch rate. A significant increasing trend in number of albatrosses attending vessels, possibly linked to declining regional ocean productivity and increasing absolute abundance of black footed albatrosses, may also have contributed to the increasing nominal seabird catch rate. Largest opportunities for reductions are through augmented efficacy of seabird bycatch mitigation north of 23° N where mitigation methods are required and during setting instead of during hauling. Both side vs. stern setting, and blue-dyed vs. untreated bait significantly reduced the seabird catch rate. Of two options for meeting regulatory requirements, side setting had a significantly lower seabird catch rate than blue-dyed bait. There was significant spatio-temporal and seasonal variation in the risk of seabird capture with highest catch rates in April and May and to the northwest of the main Hawaiian Islands. This presentation is based on the following open source publication: Gilman, E., Chaloupka, M., Peschon, J., Ellgen, S. 2016. Risk factors for seabird bycatch in a pelagic longline tuna fishery. PLoS ONE 11(5): e0155477. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0155477.

Bio(s):
Eric Gilman conducts research on: direct and collateral ecological effects of pelagic (oceanic) fisheries, fishing gear selectivity to reduce bycatch of at-risk taxa, mechanisms underpinning pelagic ecosystem stability, and broad ecosystem-level effects of fishing. He is Associate Faculty at Hawaii Pacific University and senior fisheries advisor to The Nature Conservancy. He has a PhD from the University of Tasmania School of Geography and Environmental Studies, Australia; an MSc from Oregon State University Department of Oceanography; and a BA from Wesleyan University. Publications are available at: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric_Gilman2 and https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric_Gilman2.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 March 2018

Title: Understanding and Reconciling Recent Observations of Global Temperatures
Presenter(s): Zeke Hausfather, Research Scientist, Berkeley Earth
Date & Time: 8 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Zeke Hausfather, Research Scientist, Berkeley Earth. Presenting from San Francisco.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary application works fine.

Abstract:


Abstract:
Global temperature records are subject to uncertainties due to changes in instrumentation, observation times, physical location, and other data in homogeneities. These factors complicate our assessment of the rate of recent warming and comparisons between observations and climate model projections.Here I will be discussing some recent work evaluating the homogenization of sea surface temperature (SST) records in recent years, and exploring the difference between SST records from NOAA and the UK MET Office Hadley Centre. Using independent data from buoys, Argo floats, and satellite radiometers we find that NOAA's record, which shows little evidence of an early-2000s slowdown in warming, is likely the most accurate in recent years.

Bio(s):
Zeke Hausfather is the US Analyst for Carbon Brief, a research scientist at Berkeley Earth, and is finishing a PhD with the Energy and Resources Group at U.C. Berkeley.He was previously the lead data scientist at Essess, Inc, an energy efficiency startup that develops vehicle mounted thermal imaging systems, the senior climate analyst at Project Drawdown, the chief scientist at C3 Energy, and the cofounder and chief scientist of Efficiency 2.0, a behavior-based energy efficiency company. His current research focuses on improving observational estimates of surface and near-surface temperatures, climate model/observation comparisons, and climate impacts of energy systems.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminarweekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Conservation Connections: Species and Places, NOAA's Partnerships for Transboundary Protection Program
Presenter(s): Lisamarie Carruba, NOAA NMFS and Vicki Wedell, acting Chief for Policy and Planning, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 8 March 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lisamarie Carrubba of NOAA and Vicki Wedell, acting Chief for Policy and Planning, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Register at: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/1915167454630/WN_ijMfXUTcQoCgen5ganvwxg

Sponsor(s):
Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MarineDebris.info, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe). Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The Partnerships for Transboundary Protection (PTP) Program was established by NOAA's Office of Protected Resources and Office of National Marine Sanctuaries to better connect conservation efforts directed toward marine species and their habitats. Through collaborative conservation that aligns sanctuary management plans, species' recovery plans, and habitat protection, the PTP Program is working to improve internal coordination and management of threatened and endangered species and their habitats, as well as other NOAA resources such as key fishery species in sanctuaries. The PTP Program is also working on expanding collaboration with other marine protected areas and external partners in order to further support conservation and recovery of species such as whales, corals, and Nassau grouper.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: 20 Years Worth of Sediment in Two Weeks: A Controlled Thin Layer Experiment in NC
Presenter(s): Jenny Davis, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS
Date & Time: 8 March 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar - register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jenny Davis, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)

Sponsor(s):
FWS and NOAA Restoration Webinar Series, hosts are Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov and Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Abstract:
Jenny will present to-date results from a recent thin layer sediment deposition experiment in North Carolina demonstrate increases in elevation, Spartina alterniflora biomass, and porewater concentrations of inorganic nutrients and sulfide.

Bio(s):
Jenny Davis is an Ecologist at the NOAA/NCCOS laboratory in Beaufort NC. Her broad research interests include plant ecology and biogeochemistry of coastal wetlands with a specific focus on how wetlands adapt to changing sea levels. If you are interested in receiving continuing education credits under SER's Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program, contact Jen Lyndall at certification@ser.org. To receive an e-mail notification when registration opens, send your e-mail address to jennifer_ryan@fws.gov. To access the Restoration Webinar Series recording archive, visit https://nctc.fws.gov/topic/online-training/webinars/restoration.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 March 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: The State Plane Coordinate System: History, Policy, Future Directions
Presenter(s): Michael Dennis, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 8 March 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC3 Room 8836
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Michael Dennis, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Sponsor(s):
NOAA NGS; POC for questions: christine.gallagher@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Gotomeeting webinar uses internet, VOIP or phone. Click the link to join the webinar at the specified time and date: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5578300063751046402. TO USE YOUR COMPUTER'S AUDIO:When the webinar begins, you will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended.--OR--TO USE YOUR TELEPHONE:If you prefer to use your phone, you must select "Use Telephone" after joining the webinar and call in using the numbers below.
United States: +1 (415) 655-0052 Access Code: 373-758-240Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinarWebinar ID: 942-427-523.

Abstract:
The State Plane Coordinate System will soon change. A new version (SPCS2022) will replace SPCS 83 as part of the transition to the Terrestrial Reference Frames of 2022. This webinar gives a historical overview and explores changes being considered for building the SPCS of the future.

Bio(s):
Michael Dennis is a geodesist at NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Use of scenario planning to help drive management decisions in the West Coast region
Presenter(s): Barry Thom, Regional Administrator, NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region
Date & Time: 8 March 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Barry Thom, Regional Administrator, NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Sponsor(s):
NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM. POC for questions: Vicky Krikelas at Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

WEBINAR
Join Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/nwfsc200/j.php?MTID=m5de78f759a29b11f50e0fdfa230450df
Meeting number and Access Code: 809 635 739
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207
Need help joining? Contact Support (https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-5412)

ABSTRACT
We spend a significant amount of time negotiating solutions to difficult fisheries and protected species challenges within the West Coast Region . A few key negotiation principles are useful to resolving intractable problems and achieving successful outcomes. First, the parties need to understand both their own and the other parties issues, interests, and goals. Second, the parties need to have the widest range of possible options to choose from. Third, the parties need to understand the value of those options, or the value of a mix of options. I will explore how current efforts in monitoring, ecosystem science, life cycle modeling and management strategy evaluation may help inform the second and third principles and help us achieve lasting fisheries management and protected species recovery on the West Coast.

BIO
Barry leads more than 300 NOAA Fisheries employees in nine offices from Seattle to Southern California. His region works to recover threatened and endangered species, protect marine mammals, and oversees fisheries programs along the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California. Barry has been with NOAA Fisheries for the past 17 years working in both the West Coast Regional office and Headquarters. He has worked on protected species and fisheries policy, habitat restoration, monitoring, budget and planning, and regional operations. Mr. Thom has a B.S. in Fisheries Science from Oregon State University and an M.S. in Fisheries Science from the University of Washington.

INTERESTED IN MEETING WITH THE MONSTER SEMINAR JAM SPEAKER?
If you are interested in meeting with the speaker, contact Robby Fonner at robby.fonner@noaa.gov.


"MEET OUR PARTNERS" DISCUSSION FOLLOWING THE SEMINAR

The NWFSC's new intermittent series "Meet Our Partners" involves inviting our partners to a casual information session to learn more about them and discuss projects and areas of mutual interest. At 12:30, following the Monster Jam Seminar, Barry Thom will be our inaugural "Meet the Partner" participant and will give a short overview of the West Coast Region's office and take questions from staff. Join by phone at 1-650-479-3207 or by Web Ex using meeting code 806 596 501.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: 508 Compliance Training
Presenter(s): Timothy Creagan, U.S. Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board
Date & Time: 8 March 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/HSnkZe, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Timothy Creagan, Senior Accessibility Specialist/Information Technology, U.S. Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (the Access Board)

POC: Jennifer Fagan-Fry (jennifer.fagan-fry@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
if you are located away from Silver Spring, please register for the webinar at:
https://goo.gl/HSnkZe After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Accessibility: Two American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters will be present in-person for this event. If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's Deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/RAC_inter_bus_rules.html Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar and will run in a separate browser window: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3581941&CustomerID=321

Abstract:
Federal agencies must comply with the Revised 508 Standards as of January 18, 2018. What does this mean? Join us for this session as we hear from Timothy Creagan of the U.S. Access Board as they review the changes between the original Section 508 Standards (2000) and the Revised 508 Standards (2017). Mr. Creagan is an experienced leader in the federal community with years of experience in the revision and development of the Revised 508 Standards. Join Tim as he reviews what has changed, what has remained the same, highlight available resources, share insights, and assist participants to help their agencies to successfully transition from the old to the new standards. This webinar will feature new materials developed by several agencies working together that recognized the challenges ahead and the need for roadmap along with tools for managers, team leaders, and others tasked with implementing the Revised 508 Standards. The presenter will allow time to respond to questions from webinar attendees who are encouraged to prepare their thoughts in advance. This session will be helpful to people who need to know what resources are available to assist their agencies to get on-track and to avoid compliance issues. Along with a high-level overview of the Revised 508 Standards,presenters will share best practices, helpful tips, and will provide real-life examples to better prepare your agency to successfully meet its 508 obligations.

Bio(s):
Timothy Creagan is a senior accessibility specialist with the US Access Board. He provides technical assistance and training on the Revised Section 508 Standards and the Revised Section 255 Guidelines, and he frequently presents on accessible electronic and information technology and telecommunications. He is co-chair of the Education subcommittee of the Accessibility Community of Practice of the Chief Information Officers' Council. He currently serves on the Disability Advisory Committee of the Federal Communications Commission. Mr. Creagan joined the US Access Board in 2006 to lead the team revising the Board's existing standards and guidelines for electronic and communication technologies. He served as the Designated Federal Official for the Telecommunications and Electronic and Information Technology Advisory Committee (TEITAC). He was a member of the team that developed the revised accessibility standards for information and communication technology (ICT) under Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act and the revised accessibility guidelines under Section 255 of the Communications Act, published in 2017.

He was formerly the Director of Consumer Training for the Information Technology Technical Assistance and Training Center (ITTATC) and before that he was the Director of Public Policy for Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) (formerly SHHH). Before joining HLAA, Mr. Creagan was a litigator in the courts of D.C. and Maryland. Mr. Creagan received his J.D. from the Catholic University of America, and his undergraduate degree from the University of Notre Dame.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

9 March 2018

Title: ​The Current Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Sentry and the Path Towards Getting Rid of the Ship for Future Systems
Presenter(s): Dr. Carl Kaiser, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Date & Time: 9 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, https://goo.gl/paEkcC , OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Carl Kaiser, AUV Program Manager, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

POC: Chris Beaverson (chris.beaverson@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/paEkcC After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
Dr. Kaiser will discuss the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Sentry of the National Deep Submergence Facility and its current and future capabilities. Sentry is a fully autonomous underwater vehicle capable of exploring the ocean down to 6,000 meters (19,685 feet) depth. Sentry produces bathymetric, sidescan, subbottom, and magnetic maps of the seafloor and is capable of taking digital bottom photographs in a variety of deep-sea terrains such as mid-ocean ridges, deep-sea vents, and cold seeps at ocean margins. The National Deep Submergence Facility (NDSF), hosted at WHOI, is a federally funded center that operates, maintains, and coordinates the use of three vital deep ocean vehicles: the Human Occupied Vehicle (HOV) Alvin, the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Jason/Medea, and the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV)Sentry. The NDSF is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The operation is managed by WHOI and overseen by the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), an organization of 62 academic institutions and national laboratories involved in marine research.

Bio(s):
Carl L. Kaiser, Program Manager, holds a B.S, M.S., and PhD in Mechanical Engineering (Robotics) from Colorado State University. He has previously held positions at Colorado State University and Agilent Technologies and is currently a Program Manager in the Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He manages the AUV portion of the National Deep Submergence Facility as well as numerous other operations and technology development projects at WHOI including for NSF, NOAA, ONR, the state of Massachusetts, private industry, and philanthropic organizations. His research interests include novel applications for AUVs, human robot interaction via limited or degraded communication channels, and integration of robotic technologies into human activities.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: What is the Ultimate Limit of Weather Predictability?
Presenter(s): Fuqing Zhang,Penn State University
Date & Time: 9 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Please contact the speaker for the presentation and the Youtube recording.

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Fuqing Zhang,Penn State University

Title:
What is the Ultimate Limit of Weather Predictability?
Date,Time, Room: Friday March 9 at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155
Contact: Daryl Kleist - NOAA Federal <daryl.kleist@noaa.gov>

Abstract:
Through extremely high-resolution global ensemble experiments with state-of-the-science global numerical weather prediction models from ECMWF and US NOAA, this study investigates the ultimate predictability limit of day-to-day weather phenomena such as midlatitude winter storms and summer monsoonal rainstorms. Results suggest such a limit may indeed exist that is intrinsic to the underlying dynamical system and instabilities even if the forecast model and the initial conditions are nearly perfect. Currently, the practical predictability limit of midlatitude instantaneous weather is around 10 days; reducing initial-condition error by an order of magnitude will extend the deterministic forecast lead times of day-to-day weather by up to 3-5 days, with much shorter room for improving prediction of small-scale severe weather phenomena like thunderstorms. Achieving this additional predictability limit can have enormous socioeconomic benefits but requires coordinated efforts by the entire community to design better numerical weather models, to improve observations, and to make better use of observations with advanced data assimilation and computing techniques. In essence, predictability of daily weather may be intrinsically limited to about 2 weeks but can be extended by as much as 3-5 days beyond the current-day limit.

======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

13 March 2018

Title: Methane Variation Over Terrestrial And Marine Arctic Areas (2010 – 2016): IASI Satellite Data
Presenter(s): Leonid Yurganov, PhD., Senior Research Scientist, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250. Other authors include F. Muller-Karger and I. Leifer.
Date & Time: 13 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar (see below) or in NOAA SSMC3 - new conference center on second floor - ask Jason at front desk for room no/
Description:

OnenOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Leonid Yurganov, PhD., Senior Research Scientist, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring. Co-authors include F. Muller-Karger and I. Leifer.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary app works fine.

Abstract:
There is evidence that methane is being released into the atmosphere at high northern latitudes as the Arctic warms up. Methane concentration in the Arctic lower troposphere was estimated between 2010 and 2016 with the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), a thermal IR spectrometer orbiting the Earth on a satellite MetOp-A. The area studied encompasses the Barents/Kara seas and the West Siberian Lowland (WSL), one the most important methane sources in high northern latitudes. Methane anomalies were referenced to a specific deep sea region in the North Atlantic between 50 degrees N and 83 degrees N and assumed to be proportional to methane flux. Methane anomalies over the Arctic Ocean reach maxima in winter, coinciding with periods of strong and deep mixing of the Arctic Ocean water column. In summer, anomalies over the ocean decrease to zero every year. Annually averaged anomalies over sea and over land in summer-time have been increasing after 2014, and were twice as large in 2016 compared to 2010-2013. Methane anomalies estimated using the Japanese short-wave IR spectrometer GOSAT/TANSO over the WSL have also been increasing. Annual methane flux from the Barents and Kara Seas was estimated to be about 1/3 that from the West Siberian Lowland.

Plain Language Summary: Methane input to the lower atmosphere from many ground sources is temperature-dependent. Satellite data show evidence of a growing emission of methane to the atmosphere after 2014 both from land and sea areas in the Arctic.

Bio(s):
Dr. Leonid Yurganov is a Senior Research Scientist at UMBC, Physics Dept. and JCET. His current research expertise is connected with remote sensing of tropospheric composition, mostly CO and other members of carbon family, as well as ozone. He graduated from Leningrad State University in 1969 (MS) and Institute of Atmospheric Physics in 1979 (Ph.D.), both in Russia. For many years he has been using grating spectrometers for atmospheric research in Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia.

He studied total column and surface CO abundances in 1995-1996 at the Geophysical Institute, UAF, Fairbanks, Alaska. Validation of MOPITT Terra instrument was his duty during 1997-2001 at the University of Toronto. Between 2001 and 2006 he studied variations of CO burden in the Northern Hemisphere at the Japan Marine and Earth Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC) in Yokohama. He is a co-author of 41 refereed publications.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Title: Why I put a pteropod in a CT scanner to study the impacts of ocean acidification
Presenter(s): Rosie Oakes, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University
Date & Time: 13 March 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: online only; Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7680955524254121219
Description:



Presenter(s):
Rosie Oakes, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel UniversityRegister: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7680955524254121219

Sponsor(s):
The SOARCE webinar series is co-sponsored by the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program and National Marine Sanctuaries. Seminar POC: jennifer.mintz@noaa.gov

Abstract:
Tiny swimming snails, called pteropods, have delicate shells which make them vulnerable to changes in ocean chemistry. Their shells are made from aragonite, a more soluble form of calcium carbonate, which is predicted to be chemically unstable in some parts of the ocean by the middle of the century. Why have I spent the last 5 years studying them? Because these tiny organisms are key to understanding the big picture of ocean acidification " the more CO2 that we put into the air, the more CO2 is taken up by the ocean, and the harder it is for pteropods to build and maintain their shells. Pteropods also play a crucial role in the marine food chain, eating phytoplankton and small zooplankton, and being eaten by krill, sea birds, and fish. This means changes that impact pteropods have the potential to impact the whole ocean ecosystem.

The challenge of studying, and communicating information about pteropods is their size. They are about the size of grain of sugar. In this webinar, I'll discuss how I used a micro CT scanner to image pteropods in 3D so I could measure their shell thickness and volume. I will then explain how I enlarge these 3D reconstructions to print them for educational purposes, and how you can do the same. Finally, I'll introduce my new research direction, using museum collections of pteropods to decipher how they have been affected by ocean acidification since the industrial revolution.

About our speaker: A geologist by training, Rosie stumbled into the wonderful world of pteropods after finding some shells in a sediment core she was working on during her Ph.D. Since then, Rosie has spent over 200 hours CT scanning pteropods and has used a variety of other imaging techniques to learn more about how these organisms may be affected by ocean acidification.

Rosie believes that it's important to communicate science on all levels, and so in addition to travelling to international science conferences and publishing papers, she makes time to attend school science fairs and participate in outreach events (like this one!) in a hope to inspire the next generation of scientists. Originally from the UK, Rosie is currently living in Philadelphia and working as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Two perspectives on evaluating MPA management effectiveness: lessons learned from Australia's Great Barrier Reef and India
Presenter(s): John C. Day, ARC Centre for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, Australia
Date & Time: 13 March 2018
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John C. Day, ARC Centre for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, Australia

Register: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/5515185399379/WN_RJJIdIf-TGC38sdKd7HP8w

Sponsor(s):
Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MarineDebris.info, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe)
Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov and Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Abstract:
The term 'Management Effectiveness Evaluation' (or MEE) is well recognized as an important part of adaptive management for any protected area.&nbsp; Differing assessment methodologies have emerged around the world, many of them building upon the Framework agreed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and its World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA) for assessing management effectiveness. In this talk, Jon will discuss some of the lessons learned when applying the IUCN/WCPA framework to assess MEE in a large and complex marine protected area (MPA) like the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. Jon will compare and contrast this with a similar, but simpler, use of the same IUCN framework that he developed, working in conjunction with GIZ India, for Indian MPAs.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Understanding El Nino - Using NOAA's New Educational Tools
Presenter(s): Amy Dean, NOAA's National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: 13 March 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote - Online Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Amy Dean, National Estuarine Research Reserve System

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7314238708789617667

Abstract:
People all over the world experience impacts from El Niño and La Niña, the recurring climate pattern that occurs across the tropical Pacific Ocean. As this year's La Niña subsides, join us for a science-based exploration of this powerful phenomena. In this presentation, participants will dive deep into Data in the Classroom's El Niño Module to examine decades of observations from Earth observing satellites and take a virtual tour of the new web-based curricular modules and data tools. Data in the Classroom (https://dataintheclassroom.noaa.gov/) is designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes.

More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

14 March 2018

Title: Fishing Effort Survey Transition Update
Presenter(s): Kelly Denit, Office of Sustainable Fisheries; Dave Van Voorhees, Office of Science Technology
Date & Time: 14 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, https://goo.gl/6p4HkL, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kelly Denit, Chief of the Domestic Fisheries Division in the Office of Sustainable Fisheries, and Dave Van Voorhees, Chief of the Fisheries Statistics Division in the Office of Science Technology. POC: Laura Diederick laura.diederick@noaa.gov Marine Recreational Information Program, or MRIP, in the Office of Science and Technology.

Remote Access:
Register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/6p4HkL After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
In January 2018, NOAA Fisheries completed the transition to the mail-based Fishing Effort Survey to estimate the number of shore and private boat fishing trips taken by anglers on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. We combine that information with estimates of angler catch per trip, gathered through a separate survey, to develop total recreational catch estimates. Total recreational catch is one important source of data used by scientists and managers to help ensure healthy, productive fisheries. Developed by NOAA Fisheries, state and regional partners, and independent consultants, the FES provides a more accurate estimate of recreational fishing effort than the previous Coastal Household Telephone Survey. Dave Van Voorhees and Kelly Denit, co-chairs of the Transition Team, will share updates on the transition process and timeline, as well as address frequently asked questions.

Bio(s):
Dave Van Voorhees is the Chief of the Fisheries Statistics Division in the Office of Science Technology. He has worked for the agency on recreational fisheries statistics since 1991 and is the co-chair of the Marine Recreational Information Program's Transition Team. He received a B.A. in Biology from Lehigh University, an M.A. in Biology from Wake Forest University, and a Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolution from S.U.N.Y at Stony Brook. Kelly Denit serves as Chief of the Domestic Fisheries Division in the Office of Sustainable Fisheries and co-chair of the Marine Recreational Information Program's Transition Team. Kelly has been with NOAA Fisheries for 12 years and has worked on domestic fisheries management issues since 2011. Kelly earned a B.S. in Ecology from Yale University and an M.S. in Biological Oceanography from the University of Miami.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Modelling the food web: The mass balance approach at the NEFSC (Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series)
Presenter(s): Sean Lucey, NEFSC
Date & Time: 14 March 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/aeszvB, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sean Lucey, Fishery Biologist, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC)
POC: EBFM/EBM Series, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov); Webinar host/Librarian: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://goo.gl/fddvsB After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
Welcome to the EBFM/EBM Seminar Series! Each month we feature a new speaker and a topic related to Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management/Ecosystem Based Management. Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. Our March 2018 EBFM/EBM Speaker is Sean Lucey from NOAA's NEFSC. The presentation is titled: Modelling the food web: The mass balance approach at the NEFSC. Ecosystem models are useful for providing context and understand of the system within which management decision are being made. Among a wide range of ecosystem models, a common approach for fisheries related questions are aggregate or box models, including a popular representation of the ecosystem as a mass balance model. Sean will discuss the general mass balance approach and how it has been applied at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center.

Bio(s):
Sean Lucey is a Fishery Biologist at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center. He works for the Ecosystem Dynamics and Assessment Branch in Woods Hole, MA. He serves on several international, national, and regional ecosystem working groups include WGNARS, NOAA's IEA Program Steering Committee, NMFS National EBFM working group, and NEFMC EBFM plan development team.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar:http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3584404&CustomerID=321 If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

15 March 2018

Title: NOAA in the Arctic
Presenter(s): David Kennedy, Senior Advisor for the Arctic Region, NOAA
Date & Time: 15 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David Kennedy, Senior Advisor for the Arctic Region, NOAA

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to http://www.mymeetings.com. Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is actively engaged in the Arctic, providing science, service, and stewardship to this rapidly changing region, its inhabitants, and the Nation. Through its broad range of activities, NOAA is well prepared to make significant contributions, to the extent possible within existing resources, to all three lines of effort in the recently released U.S.National Strategy for the Arctic Region (May 2013) and its subsequent Implementation Plan (January 2014). As described in its 2011 Arctic Vision and Strategy, NOAA has six strategic goals in the Arctic, each of which directly supports the National Strategy.

Advancing U.S. security interests in the Arctic requires improved maritime domain awareness, for which NOAA's weather and sea ice forecasts are critically important. NOAA's sea ice research strengthens forecasts of both ice and weather conditions as well as building a better understanding of the direct links between sea ice and climate. As a result of this research, the complicated linkages among melting sea ice, changing climate, and weather patterns in the Arctic and around the globe are becoming more apparent and allow better planning to cope with Arctic change.

NOAA plays a key role in pursuing responsible Arctic region stewardship. Foundational science enables better understanding of Arctic ecosystems, the atmosphere, climate, and their dynamic interconnections. NOAA's fisheries research and management programs are likewise vital, particularly for the economically important U.S. Bering Sea fisheries. Research and stewardship of marine ecosystems and protected species like marine mammals promote sustainable use, conservation, and protection from potential impacts of offshore development, increased shipping,and environmental degradation. NOAA provides important services to coastal communities by improving safe Arctic maritime access with mapping and charting as well as increasing preparedness and communities' resilience to intensifying weather. NOAA is also an important partner in hazard response and mitigation (e.g., providing scientific support to the U.S. Coast Guard after oil spills). Research relevant to oil spills, sea ice, and marine ecosystems will help to prepare for and to protect against potential environmental disasters in the Arctic.

All of NOAA's Arctic activities are united in one aspect: leveraging national and international partnerships and collaborating to support common Arctic goals. NOAA strengthens international cooperation through the Arctic Council, joint research opportunities, and provision of services. NOAA also has many successful Arctic national partnerships, within and outside the Federal Government. Existing partnerships will be strengthened and new ones developed in the coming years as NOAA continues its work to address the Nation's challenges in the Arctic.

Bio(s):
After six years as a U.S. Air Force pilot based in Alaska, Mr. Kennedy spent several years with the University of Alaska's Geophysical Institute. There he was the Research Facilities Director and later he was the Director of the Spilled Oil Research Team focusing on arctic pollution issues. This experience led to a 30-year career devoted to environmental management. During this time, Mr. Kennedy established himself as a recognized national expert in the field of emergency pollution response;contingency planning; innovative technology development; matrix and collaborative program management; and a suite of coastal issues dealing with development, climate change, energy, and coastal resiliency. His reputation is based on a broad range of experiences and training combined with the ability to bring balance and objectivity to complex and high-stress situations. Mr. Kennedy's experience covers the entire suite of activities from field science and coordination to program management and development of national initiatives and legislation.His most recent work, prior to his retirement from the Federal government in January 2014, was in the role of Deputy Under Secretary for Operations at NOAA. In addition to being the operational lead for the Bureau, he has taken the lead on all NOAA related Arctic issues on behalf of the Under Secretary for NOAA and the Department of Commerce. This role includes leading the agency on drafting and implementing the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, developing the Integrated Arctic Management Report, implementing the National Ocean Policy, representing NOAA and the Department of Commerce on the Alaskan Interagency Working Group,working closely with Environment Canada on Arctic related issues, supporting the Arctic Council, and developing and implementing the NOAA/USCG Maritime Strategy.Coming out of retirement in May 2014, Mr. Kennedy returned to NOAA in the role of Senior Policy Adviser for the Arctic Region in NOAA. In this role he works closely with NOAA Headquarters leadership, Line and Staff Office leadership and the NOAA Arctic Task Force to address NOAA-wide Arctic policy goals, objectives, and program issues. He provides guidance and direction on a broad scope of Arctic regional policy as well as support on major legislation, budget and programs related to the Arctic. Additionally, Mr. Kennedy coordinates Arctic activities on priority issues established by NOAA senior leadership and work independently to develop, coordinate, and helps implement new policy, programs, and activities within the Department and throughout the Administration. Mr. Kennedy participates in NOAA activities supporting NOAA's Arctic Vision and Strategy as well as in inter-agency working groups to represent policies, objectives, and decisions of NOAA leadership and to ensure close coordination and cooperation among Federal agencies, stakeholders, and Congressional staff.
Title: Testing a Novel Adaptation Strategy in a California Salt Marsh
Presenter(s): Karen Thorne, USGS and Evyan Sloane, State of California
Date & Time: 15 March 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar - register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Karen Thorne, USGS and Evyan Sloane, State of California

Sponsor(s):
FWS and NOAA Restoration Webinar Series, hosts are Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov and Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Abstract:
Speakers will discuss the Seal Beach Sediment Augmentation Project's novel sea-level rise adaptation strategy in a subsiding salt marsh by spraying clean dredge material on the vegetated marsh and monitoring the physical and biological effects.

Bio(s):
Karen Thorne is a Principle Investigator with the USGS Western Ecological Research Center, where her research focus is in climate change impacts to ecosystems. In particular, her work has included assessing sea-level rise and storms impacts to nearshore ecosystems, wetland ecology and wildife. She received her Ph.D. and MS from the University of California, Davis. Dr. Thorne's interests lie in conservation issues surrounding climate-related research that assess changes to ecosystems and wildlife. Her current focus is assessing how sea-level rise and storms impact salt marsh ecosystems and local wildlife populations. In particular, Dr. Thorne is interested in how wildlife respond to high water events and how this relates to predation and breeding success. Her research is based on field data collection methods that can be developed into climate change impact models using ArcGIS and other remote sensing tools. Evyan Borgnis Sloane is a Project Manager for the California State Coastal Conservancy. Her restoration projects span many coastal and estuarine habitat-types across southern California. She obtained her M.S. in Biology and Systematic Ecology from San Francisco State University in 2013. Now with the Coastal Conservancy, she specializes in developing and managing innovative coastal restoration projects founded in science and resilient to global climate change. She also works with the Southern California Wetlands Recovery Project striving to develop successful, sustainable, and coordinated wetland restoration projects. If you are interested in receiving continuing education credits under SER's Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program, contact Jen Lyndall at certification@ser.org. To receive an e-mail notification when registration opens, send your e-mail address to jennifer_ryan@fws.gov. To access the Restoration Webinar Series recording archive, visit https://nctc.fws.gov/topic/online-training/webinars/restoration.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 March 2018

Title: Managing Drought in the Southern Plains
Presenter(s): John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist
Date & Time: 16 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John Nielsen-Gammon

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for the webinar at
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3278868307969597185

Abstract:
Due to drought severity across the Southern Plains, including portions of Kansas, Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma, a collaboration of drought and climate experts are providing stakeholders with the latest information on current conditions, impacts, and outlooks. Join Texas State Climatologist John Neilsen-Gammon on March 16 for the first in this webinar series which will feature presentations by regional experts followed by a Q & A session. The webinar will be recorded and made available on drought.gov.

Bio(s):
John Nielsen-Gammon is a Regents Professor at Texas A&MUniversity and is the Texas State Climatologist. Dr. Nielsen-Gammon received anS.B. in Earth and Planetary Sciences (1984), an S.M. in Meteorology (1987), anda Ph.D. in Meteorology (1990), all from the Massachusetts Institute ofTechnology. Dr. Nielsen-Gammon joined the faculty of Texas A&M Universityin 1991 and was appointed Texas State Climatologist by then-Governor George W.Bush in 2000. Dr. Nielsen-Gammon conducts research on large-scale andlocal-scale meteorology, basic and applied climatology, and air pollutionmeteorology. He teaches courses in weather analysis and forecasting, climate,climate change, and computer modeling. He is a Fellow of the AmericanMeteorological Society.

19 March 2018

Title: Remote Sensing of Power Outages Following Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria of 2017
Presenter(s): William Straka, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies University of Wisconsin and Lori Schultz, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
Date & Time: 19 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Greentech IV Bldg, 7700 Hubble Drive, Lanham MD 20771, Conference Room S650
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
William Straka, Cooperative Institute for MeteorologicalSatellite Studies University of Wisconsin and Lori Schultz NASA Marshall Space FlightCenter

Sponsor(s):
Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) December Science Seminar
POC for questions: Dr. Mitch Goldberg (mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov
877-401-9225 pc: 53339716 JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m71bfd254eebbaa427aae8fc3c52ad60a
Meeting number: 745 313 781
Host key: 672945
Meeting password: Jpss2018!

Abstract:
The 2017 hurricane season included three major hurricanes with impacts to theUnited States, Puerto Rico, and the Caribbean Islands. Harvey's initial landfall along Texas coast, followed by slow movement and record-settin grainfall over the Houston metro led to widespread urban and river flooding overmultiple days. Irma's winds across to the Caribbean Islands, Florida, and the southeastern states contributed to coastal and inland flooding, extensive wind damage, and numerous power outages. The long-lasting impacts to the electrical infrastructure of Puerto Rico from Maria were widely reported and a scarcity of power continues in some areas several months later. Remote sensing scientists from NASA, NOAA, and academia, collaborated to assist the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. National Guard, and others in their assessment, response to,and recovery from this triad of disaster events. The capabilities of nex tgeneration satellites map the impacts of the loss of electricity in the immediate aftermath of the storms as well as the and slow recovery of light,particularly in the hardest hit areas such as Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. These broad community efforts,examples of mapping techniques, and collaborations with end users will be discussed to highlight the successes and as well as capture future opportunities in remote sensing for disaster response to loss of power.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Observations on the Ocean’s Mason-Dixon Line
Presenter(s): Mike Muglia, Research Scientist, UNC Coastal Studies Institute/UNC Chapel Hill. Presenting in person at NOAA
Date & Time: 19 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mike Muglia, Research Scientist, UNC Coastal Studies Institute/UNC Chapel Hill. Presenting in person at NOAA.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Greg.Dusek@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary plugin works fine.


Abstract:
Cape Hatteras, NC is the location of a complex confluence of ocean currents on the shelf, shelf slope, and near the abyss. The different water masses influence local weather and water temperatures at the beach, produce upwelling that supports an abundant fishery, and pose numerous scientific questions about current interactions, atmospheric stability, wind and marine hydrokinetic energy resources, and the Atlantic's meridional overturning circulation.

Mike will provide an overview of an extensive observing program off the North Carolina coast that is helping us understand this complex confluence of currents, and answer questions about the marine hydrokinetic energy resource potential off Cape Hatteras. Observations to be highlighted include: nested 13 MHz WERA and 5 MHz Codar HF radars, moored and vessel mounted 38, 75, 150, 300, and 600 kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers, Slocum and Spray gliders, buoys, numerous CTD casts and moored time series, and several years of acoustic hydrophone recordings on the shelf slope.

Bio(s):
Mike Muglia helped found the UNC Coastal Studies Institute and leads CSI's Gulf Stream resource assessment for the NC Ocean Energy Program. His scientific interests include understanding variability in position and transport of western boundary currents and the complex confluence of different shelf water masses, and meridional overturning circulation linkages between western boundary currents and deep western boundary currents. Specifics of my ongoing research efforts include:
- Understanding high frequency variability in the cyclonic shear zone of the Gulf Stream with HF radars
- Quantifying the variability in the available hydrokinetic energy resource from the Gulf Stream for the state of NC
- Inferring Gulf Stream transport from HF radar surface current measurements
- Gulf Stream, Mid Atlantic Bight, South Atlantic Bight, Chesapeake Bay Outflow, and Slope Sea water mass dynamics off of NC

In 2018, Mike hopes to earn his Ph.D. in Oceanography at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2002, he earned an M.S. in Physics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and in 2000, he earned a B.S. in Physics at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. In 1996 he earned a B.S. in Biology, B.S. in Marine Science; University of Miami. Mike is a self described surf junky and ocean nut. He's tempted by anything salty, especially surfing, but also seafood, fishing, diving, snorkeling, and being on the water.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

20 March 2018

Title: Wave Energy-Based Guidance for Siting Living Shorelines
Presenter(s): Jenny Davis, Coastal Ecologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science in Beaufort NC and Lora Eddy, Coastal Geologist,The Nature Conservancy
Date & Time: 20 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jenny Davis, Coastal Ecologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) in Beaufort NC and Lora Eddy, Coastal Geologist,The Nature Conservancy

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.


Abstract:
Widespread acceptance of living shorelines for shoreline stabilization has been limited by uncertainty about the wave energy settings under which living shorelines provide adequate protection. To address this uncertainty, NCCOS and TNC recently partnered to develop a web-based guidance tool for pairing living shoreline design to site-specific shoreline wave energy conditions. The siting guidance provided in this tool is supported by a decade-long research program that monitored changes in vegetation, shoreline position, and surface elevation in natural fringing marshes and created living shorelines. Using this data, we evaluated marsh stability with respect to both modeled nearshore wind-wave energy, and estimated boat wake energy to predict where shoreline energetics will support the use of living shoreline techniques. The Living Shorelines application, part of
The Nature Conservancy's web-based Coastal Resilience tool (http://maps.coastalresilience.org/northcarolina/), provides spatially explicit guidance on living shoreline design in a user-friendly format to aid in broadened implementation of these projects.

Bio(s):
Jenny Davis is a coastal ecologist with NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) in Beaufort NC. Her research interests include basic ecology and biogeochemistry of coastal ecosystems, how vegetated coastal systems respond to changes in sea level, and how these systems can best be incorporated into natural infrastructure strategies.

Lora Eddy is a coastal geologist and North Carolina's Coastal Engagement Coordinator. She has spent her career working with coastal communities in Florida, Oregon, and Washington on environmental permitting, regulation, planning, and stormwater topics. Since joining the Conservancy in 2016, she has brought this knowledge and experience to the Conservancy's Coastal Resilience project to help NC's communities examine nature's role in reducing coastal hazards. She is working with several communities in northeastern North Carolina to design decision support tools that enable communities to evaluate the role that coastal habitats play in risk reduction and adaptation.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NCL Knowledge Workshop: Predatory Publishing & Evaluating Journals
Presenter(s): Trevor Riley, MLIS, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 20 March 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, https://goo.gl/BNKnyN, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Trevor Riley, MLIS, Head of Public Services, NOAA Central Library.

POCs: Trevor Riley (Trevor.Riley@noaa.gov); Outreach Librarian/NCL Knowledge Workshops Webinar Host: Katie Rowley (Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Located outside Silver Spring? Register for the

Remote Access:
https://goo.gl/BNKnyN After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
Welcome to the bimonthly series: NCL Knowledge Workshops. Lead by Trevor Riley, Head of Public Services at the NOAA Central Library, each bimonthly NCL Knowledge Workshop will feature a different topic. March's NCL Knowledge Workshop topic is Predatory Publishing & Evaluating Journals.

With the rise of the Open Access movement, the scientific community is now facing exploitative publishing practices by predatory publishers. In this Knowledge Workshop you will learn about common characteristics of these journals and how to evaluate a publication. The library will also introduce you to tools you can use when selecting the best place to publish your research!

Bio(s):
Trevor Riley is Head of Public Services at the NOAA Central Library.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar​: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3585941&CustomerID=321 If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/RAC_inter_bus_rules.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Moved to 4/17: NOAA Marine Debris Toolkit for Educators: Incorporating citizen science and community action into an educational setting
Presenter(s): Alyssa Nally, Project Coordinator, NOAA's Ocean Guardian School Program and Sherry Lippiatt, NOAA Marine Debris Program California Regional Coordinator
Date & Time: 20 March 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar: see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Alyssa Nally, Project Coordinator, NOAA's Ocean Guardian School Program and Sherry Lippiatt, NOAA Marine Debris Program California Regional Coordinator Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Seminar host is Seaberry.Nachbar@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register for Marine Debris Toolkit for Educators on Apr 17, 2018 12:00 PM PDT at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7753989484183770115 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Brought to you by GoToWebinar® Webinars Made Easy®.

Abstract:
The Marine Debris Toolkit serves as a unique collaborative effort between the NOAA Marine Debris Program and the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries to reduce our impact on the ocean through hands-on scientific monitoring, targeted education, and community outreach. Composed of teacher resources, data collection and analysis guidelines, and community engagement and outreach activities, this toolkit empowers students to become ocean stewards by taking action against marine debris on campus, in their local community, and at home. During this presentation, participants will receive an in-depth look into this new education tool.

Bio(s):
Alyssa Nally, coordinator for NOAA's Ocean Guardian School program, is an environmental educator with a background in program development and coordination in both the nonprofit and government sectors. She recently received her master's in Applied Marine and Watershed Science from California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB) where she focused her studies on human impacts, specifically plastic pollution, on marine ecosystems. As an informal educator, she is passionate about utilizing hands-on citizen science activities to inspire the next generation of ocean stewards. Sherry Lippiatt is the California Regional Coordinator for NOAA's Marine Debris Program. In this role, Sherry works with local partners and key stakeholders to identify regional marine debris priorities and provides expertise and oversight for MDP-funded projects in the state. Sherry also leads the MDP's flagship citizen science program, the Marine Debris Monitoring and Assessment Project. She has a Ph.D. in Ocean Sciences from the University of California Santa Cruz and a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. In 2016, Sherry was selected as a NOAA National Ocean Service Team Member of the Year.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 March 2018

Title: Risk Factors for Seabird Bycatch in the Hawaii Longline Deep-set Tuna Fishery
Presenter(s): Eric Gilman, Tuna Program, The Nature Conservancy, Co-authors include: Milani Chaloupka, Ecological Modeling Services and University of Queens, and John Peschon and Sarah Ellgen, both with NOAA NMFS PIRO
Date & Time: 21 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: WEBINAR ONLY; see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Eric Gilman, Tuna Program, The Nature Conservancy. Co-authors include: Milani Chaloupka, Ecological Modeling Services and University of Queens, and John Peschon and Sarah Ellgen, both with NOAA/NMFS/PIRO

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is available only over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary app works fine.

Abstract:
Capture in global pelagic longline fisheries threatens the viability of some seabird populations. The Hawaii longline tuna fishery annually catches hundreds of seabirds, primarily Laysan (Phoebastria immutabilis) and black-footed (P. nigripes) albatrosses. Since seabird regulations were introduced in 2001, the seabird catch rate has declined 74%. However, over the past decade, seabird catch levels significantly increased due to significant increasing trends in both effort and nominal seabird catch rates. We modelled observer data using a spatio-temporal generalized additive mixed model with zero-inflated Poisson likelihood to determine the significance of the effect of various risk factors on the seabird catch rate. The seabird catch rate significantly increased as annual mean multivariate ENSO index values increased, suggesting that decreasing ocean productivity observed in recent years in the central north Pacific may have contributed to the increasing trend in nominal seabird catch rate. A significant increasing trend in number of albatrosses attending vessels, possibly linked to declining regional ocean productivity and increasing absolute abundance of black footed albatrosses, may also have contributed to the increasing nominal seabird catch rate. Largest opportunities for reductions are through augmented efficacy of seabird bycatch mitigation north of 23 degrees N where mitigation methods are required and during setting instead of during hauling. Both side vs. stern setting, and blue-dyed vs. untreated bait significantly reduced the seabird catch rate. Of two options for meeting regulatory requirements, side setting had a significantly lower seabird catch rate than blue-dyed bait. There was significant spatio-temporal and seasonal variation in the risk of seabird capture with highest catch rates in April and May and to the northwest of the main Hawaiian Islands. This presentation is based on the following open source publication: Gilman, E., Chaloupka, M., Peschon, J., Ellgen, S. 2016. Risk factors for seabird bycatch in a pelagic longline tuna fishery. PLoS ONE 11(5): e0155477. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0155477.

Bio(s):
Eric Gilman conducts research on: direct and collateral ecological effects of pelagic (oceanic) fisheries, fishing gear selectivity to reduce bycatch of at-risk taxa, mechanisms underpinning pelagic ecosystem stability, and broad ecosystem-level effects of fishing. He is Associate Faculty at Hawaii Pacific University and senior fisheries advisor to The Nature Conservancy. He has a PhD from the University of Tasmania School of Geography and Environmental Studies, Australia; an MSc from Oregon State University Department of Oceanography; and a BA from Wesleyan University. Publications are available at: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric_Gilman2 and https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric_Gilman2.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Diet tracing in ecology: Method comparison and selection
Presenter(s): Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA.
Date & Time: 21 March 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jens Nielsen Ph.D., NRC postdoctoral researcher, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA. Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).


Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:
Determining diets is a prerequisite for understanding species interactions, food web structure and ecological dynamics, yet empirical characterization of feeding interactions remains challenging. I will provide an overview, and discuss strength and weaknesses of some of the common dietary methods, such as visual techniques (e.g. gut, stomach, fecal or scat content analyses), DNA identification of prey items and stable isotope analyses of bulk or specific compounds such as amino acids. At the end I will briefly introduce my current work focusing on analyzing long-term ichthyoplankton data in an effort to develop biological indicators of ecosystem changes along the US west coast from California to AlaskaSeminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 March 2018

Title: Economic Valuation of Natural Infrastructure Provided by the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve
Presenter(s): Jarrod Loerzel, Social Scientist, Matt Gorstein, Resource Economist, Chloe Fleming, Social Scientist, Sarah Gonyo, Resource Economist, all from NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS
Date & Time: 22 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jarrod Loerzel, Social Scientist, Matt Gorstein, Resource Economist, Chloe Fleming, Social Scientist, Sarah Gonyo, Resource Economist, all from NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science - NCCOS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct application for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
For this project, we estimated the economic value of shoreline protection provided by natural habitats (such as marshes) to areas in and around the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve (JC NERR) using a combination of storm, coastal wave, and marsh migration models (i.e. ADCIRC+SWAN and SLAMM). The economic value of natural infrastructure in the area was estimated by first identifying and mapping shoreline habitats in relation to developed land areas vulnerable to environmental threats such as storm surge and sea level rise. Then, researchers estimated the amount of shoreline protection provided to those areas by existing shoreline habitats in a select number of storm and marsh migration scenarios. Finally, we articulate the calculated value of damages avoided (e.g., from storm surge and sea level rise) to coastal communities due to the presence of natural infrastructure using three storm scenarios coupled with current and future marsh migration. Using the assembled data and results, additional analyses may help determine locations for future nature-based infrastructure projects to increase any coastal community's resilience to future environmental or climate-based disturbances.


Bio(s):
Jarrod Loerzel is a social scientist with NOAA NCCOS and works at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Among other things, Jarrod's work is focused on the development, theory, and application of a variety of survey methods. He is interested in the spatial aspects of social phenomena, particularly as they relate to place attachment and environmental resource condition.

Matt Gorstein is a natural resource economist with NOAA NCCOS sitting at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Much of his work is focused on economic valuation and statistical analysis, as well as data collection and data management. Matt is interested in indicator development, ecosystem service valuation, and in using numbers to tell stories.

Chloe Fleming is a marine and coastal social scientist and policy specialist with NOAA NCCOS at the Hollings Marine Lab in Charleston, SC. Her work is focused on the interactions between communities and coastal and marine environments. Among other things, Chloe is interested in community vulnerability and resilience to climate change impacts, sustainable use and management of coastal resources, and scientific writing and communication.

Sarah Gonyo is an economist with NOAA NCCOS in Silver Spring, MD. Her work is focused on economic valuation, survey development, and statistical analysis. Sarah is interested in ecosystem service valuation, particularly non-market valuation, and how humans use and interact with nature.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

23 March 2018

Title: Subseasonal Forecasting with an Icosahedral, Vertically Quasi-Lagrangian Coupled Model: Systematic Errors and Deterministic/Probabilistic Forecast Skill
Presenter(s): Shan Sun, NOAA/ESRL/GSD
Date & Time: 23 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Shan Sun (NOAA/ESRL/GSD)
Contact: Avichal Mehra - NOAA Federal <avichal.mehra@noaa.gov>

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=m82067af343b21a96c89edd237899da18
Meeting number: 900 947 999
Host key: 796253
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN

JOIN BY PHONE
866-756-2072
Participant: 4546287#

Can't join the meeting? Contact support here:
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:
TheFIM-iHYCOM coupled model has been running real-time for NOAA's SubseasonalExperiment (SubX) since July 2017. It couples the atmospheric Flow-followingfinite volume Icosahedral Model (FIM) to an icosahedral version of the HYbridCoordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). This coupled model is unique in terms of itsgrid structure: in the horizontal, both atmospheric and ocean model operate ona common icosahedral mesh, eliminating the need for a flux interpolator; in thevertical, both models use an adaptive ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian)coordinate. FIM uses GFS physics package, with an option of Grell-Freitas scaleaware convective parameterization.ForSubX, FIM-iHYCOM initializes four time-lagged ensemble members around eachWednesday, and integrates for 32 days. Preliminaryresults from the multi-year hindcastsindicate that both deterministic andprobabilistic forecast skill of week-3-4 fromFIM-iHYCOM are comparable to those ofthe operational model CFSv2. Moreover, we will discuss model skills in simulatingMadden-Julian Oscillation index, blocking frequency and sudden stratosphericwarming events.
======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 March 2018

Title: Women in NOAA Corps: A Women's History month presentation
Presenter(s): LTJG Melissa D. Mathes, NOAA Commissioned Corps
Date & Time: 26 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/De3LdS, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
LTJG Melissa D. Mathes, NOAA Commissioned Corps, Assistant to the Deputy Director National Weather Service

POC: LTJG Melissa D. Mathes (melissa.d.mathes@noaa.gov) NOAA Commissioned Corps; Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov) Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator

Remote Access:
Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/De3LdS After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
In honor of Women's History month, Lieutenant Melissa D. Mathes, NOAA Corps, will discuss the historical role of women in NOAA Corps and her own road to NOAA Corps.

Bio(s):
Mathes graduated Magna Cum Laude from Texas A&M University in 2013 with a Bachelor's of Science in Marine Biology. Mathes joined the NOAA Commissioned Corps in 2014, following service in the U.S. Army Reserves and U.S. Navy.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar:
http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3587250&CustomerID=321 If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/RAC_inter_bus_rules.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Improved Statistical Postprocessing of Precipitation for the NWS Forecasts and Hydrologic Applications
Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas M. Hamill, NOAA Earth System Research Lab, Physical Sciences Division
Date & Time: 26 March 2018
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Thomas M. Hamill, NOAA Earth System Research Lab, Physical Sciences Division Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1902655782769094914

Abstract:
Accurate numerical forecasts of precipitation have many purposes, including providing forcings to hydrologic models used to predict river flow and Great Lakes water levels. Commonly, the raw model guidance may exhibit both random and systematic errors, such as an overabundance of light precipitation and not enough heavy precipitation. If the raw guidance is used to provide precipitation forcings to hydrologic predictions, the accuracy of those predictions will suffer. A potential solution is the statistical postprocessing of the numerical guidance, using past forecasts and observations (or analyses) to statistically adjust the current model guidance. Statistical postprocessing of precipitation amount is quite challenging; to have an adequate training sample of unusual events such as heavy precipitation, either a long time series of past forecasts and analyses are needed (i.e., reforecasts) or advanced statistical methods to leverage shorter training data sets. In this seminar I will describe an advanced precipitation postprocessing algorithm in development that is intended for operational use in the NWS roughly a year hence. Each of the ensemble predictions are statistically postprocessed to adjust for biases in the mean amount and for excessive confidence. Short training data sets (the last 60 days of forecasts and analyses) are used. Biases in the mean amount are addressed through "quantile mapping" using cumulative distributions functions (CDFs) of analyzed and forecast precipitation. To address the small training sample size, the training sample used to populate CDFs at a particular location are supplemented by data from other locations with similar precipitation climatologies and terrain characteristics. The final probabilities are determined from a weighted linear combination of "dressed" ensemble members. The resultant probabilistic forecasts are greatly improved, as will be demonstrated with verification statistics and some case studies. After presentation of results, I welcome discussion about the potential relevance of this algorithm for forcing hydrologic predictions of the Great Lakes.

Bio(s):
I perform, coordinate, and lead R&D to improve NOAA's probabilistic weather forecasts on time scales of days to several weeks. The probabilistic forecasts are based on ensembles of weather simulations using different initial conditions and methods for simulating imperfections in the forecast model. I also am involved in the "post-processing" of ensembles of forecasts, making corrections to the real-time forecasts based on discrepancies noted between past forecasts and observations or analyses. My team and I develop these research methods, demonstrate their suitability for operational use, and then work with colleagues in the National Weather Service to adapt them for daily use by forecasters and the public. We document our work in the form of peer-reviewed journal articles, presentations, white papers, book chapters, and so forth. I have several additional roles. I am co-chairperson of the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO's) Data Assimilation and Observing Systems committee. I am on the management board of the NOAA-NCAR Developmental Test Center, and I am on Cornell University's Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences review board. I have previously been an editor of the American Meteorological Society's journal "Monthly Weather Review" and served for many years on the WMO's Working Group for Numerical Experimentation. Recently I contributed to the NWS Service Assessment in the wake of the severe flooding in Boulder (Sep 2013).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

27 March 2018

Title: Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States
Presenter(s): Amanda Staudt, Director of the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and Polar Research Board within the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine -NASEM-; Katie Thomas, Senior Program Officer for the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate within NASEM; Steven C. Wofsy, the Abbott Lawrence Rotch Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Science at Harvard University; and James W.C. White, Dean of the College of Arts Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Professor of Geological Sciences
Date & Time: 27 March 2018
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Amanda Staudt (PhD), Director of the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and Polar Research Board within the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM)Katie Thomas, Senior Program Officer for the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate within the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM)Steven C. Wofsy (PhD), the Abbott Lawrence Rotch Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Science at Harvard UniversityJames W.C. White (PhD), Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Professor of Geological Sciences.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's OAR / Climate Program Office. The points of contact for the report are Kenneth.Mooney@noaa.gov and Monika.Kopacz@noaa.gov.The point of contact for the event and webinar is David.Herring@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Due to popular interest in this briefing, please note that we have moved to another GoToWebinar account to accommodate a much larger number of attendees. (NOTE: The new webinar registration information below replaces the information I provided earlier.)
To attend, you will need to register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7412241480075887107

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing instructions on how to join the webinar.

Abstract:
On March 27, representatives from the National Academy of Sciences will publicly release their new report, titled Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States, which was sponsored largely by NOAA's OAR / Climate Program Office in partnership with DOE, EPA, and NASA. This report examines current approaches to measuring, monitoring, reporting, and developing inventories of human emissions of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is the second most prevalent greenhouse gas emitted in the United States. Although it is shorter-lived in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide, methane is more efficient at absorbing heat. More accurate inventories of human-emitted methane in the United States and a framework for long term monitoring and reporting would help improve the scientific bases of strategies for reducing emissions. In this session, there will be an up-front presentation by the NAS program manager and the report's leading principal investigators, followed by a facilitated Q&A and discussion session.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Buffer Options for the Bay: An in-depth look at the use of vegetated buffers in New Hampshire
Presenter(s): Cory Riley, Reserve Manager, Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Southeastern New Hampshire
Date & Time: 27 March 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only - see login below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Cory Riley, Reserve Manager, Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Southeastern New Hampshire Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar Seminar Points of Contact: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or boumad@umich.edu

Remote Access:
Please register through GoToWebinar https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2457306621825538562

Abstract:
Buffers intersect with a range of activities including land acquisition, management, and protection; restoration; community engagement; and policy making. Underpinning such decisions are tradeoffs that impact economic vitality, environmental health, and community well-being. To help decision makers navigate these tradeoffs and understand their options for action, the project team conducted an integrated assessment, aggregating existing physical and social science data; conducting a policy analysis; quantifying potential willingness to pay for management options based on water quality benefits; assessed values, knowledge, and assumptions at the community level; and then integrating these findings into a series of reports, maps, a website, and an action plan. See Project Factsheet: Exploring the Trends, the Science, and the Options of Buffer Management in the Great Bay Watershed - http://graham.umich.edu/activity/32648

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

29 March 2018

Title: Mapping Tidal Wetlands and Their Losses on the U.S. West Coast: New Methods, New Insights
Presenter(s): Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis OR and Marine Resource Management Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis
Date & Time: 29 March 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis OR and Marine Resource Management Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR. Presenting from Corvallis.

Coauthors: Correigh Greene1, Van Hare2, Brett Holycross2, Andy Lanier3, Hiroo Imaki1, Tanya Haddad3, Randy Dana3, Walter Heady4, Kevin O'Connor5. Co-author affiliations:
1 NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA
2 Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland, OR
3 Oregon Coastal Management Program, Dept. of Land Conservation and Development, Salem, OR
4 The Nature Conservancy
5 Moss Landing Marine Labs

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
How can we be more effective in our work to conserve and restore estuarine wetlands on the U.S. West Coast, both under current conditions and projected future sea level rise? The first step is to make sure we have accurately mapped the historical and current extent of estuarine wetlands. Existing tidal wetland mapping such as the National Wetland Inventory has limitations for these purposes; for example, it doesn't explicitly mapformer tidal wetlands (which represent restoration opportunities). To meet today's coastal resource management needs, our team, coordinated through the Pacific Marine and Estuarine Fish Habitat Partnership (PMEP), recently generated new maps of current and historical tidal wetlands for the entire contiguous U.S. West Coast (Washington, Oregon, and California). The new maps use LIDAR digital elevation models (DEMs) and
NOAA extreme water level models to establish the maximum extent of tidal wetlands, and they represent a major step forward in accuracy and utility for restoration planning and analysis of wetland loss and conversion. Building from this new base, our team developed an indirect method for mapping tidal wetland losses, and generated maps of these losses for 55 estuaries on the West Coast, representing about 98% of historical West Coast tidal wetland area. Based on this assessment, about 85% of tidal wetlands have been lost from West Coast estuaries, a figure of clear significance. The new maps will help interested groups develop improved action plans for conserving what remains, and for restoring tidal wetlands to support vital habitat for fish and wildlife and many other valued wetland functions.

Bio(s):
Laura Brophy is the Director of the Estuary Technical Group at the Institute for Applied Ecology in Corvallis, Oregon. She provides leadership in science-based decision support for estuary restoration and conservation priorities in the Pacific Northwest. Her current work focuses on West Coast estuarine habitat mapping and prioritization; analysis of climate change threats and strategic planning for sustainability of Pacific Northwest wetland ecosystems; and effectiveness monitoring at Oregon's largest tidal wetland restoration projects.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

3 April 2018

Title: Coastal Water Quality Satellite Observations in Puerto Rico after Extreme Hurricane Events
Presenter(s): William J. Hernandez, NOAA Center for Earth System Science and Remote Sensing Technologies, City College, City University of New York, New York, NY
Date & Time: 3 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
William J. Hernandez (william.hernandez@upr.edu), NOAA Center for Earth System Science and Remote Sensing Technologies (CESSRST), City College, City University of New York,New York, NY

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
Satellite remote sensing has been used to study the effects of hurricanes and major storms on the bio-optical properties of ocean waters. This assessment was performed on satellite images collected immediately after two Category 4 hurricanes hit Puerto Rico (Hurricane Irma, September 6, 2017; Hurricane Maria, September 20, 2017). Maria's precipitation of over 96 cm (38.9 inches) from September 20-21, 2017 caused 13 river gauges around Puerto Rico to record floods. To overcome the missing data caused by persistent hurricane cloud cover, a multi-sensor approach was used to include other satellite sensors, such as the NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer, Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager, and the European Space Agency Sentinel-2 Multispectral Instrument and Sentinel-3 Ocean Land Colour Instrument. This approach made it possible to piece together 'true color' visualizations of major plumes at high spatial resolution. Additionally, satellite ocean color products such as diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490nm (Kd[490], an index of turbidity) and chlorophyll-a (chl-a) were also evaluated. An assessment of coastal water quality conditions, based on these products, The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) imagery produced by the NOAA Ocean Color Team and delivered online by NOAA Coral Reef Watch were used to derive the products and evaluate the water quality. The study demonstrates that these remote sensing tools can provide rapid assessment of water quality conditions on critical coastal ecosystems following major storm events. The methodology and results from this assessment will be presented.

Bio(s):
Dr. Hernandez is currently appointed as a Post-Doctoral Researcher for the NOAA CREST City College City University of New York. He has more than 12 years of experience in the analysis and processing of remotely sensed data and Geographic Information Systems. His education consist of a Bachelor's degree in Biology, a Master's degree in Environmental Science (Water Resources) and a Ph.D. in Marine Sciences (Biological Oceanography) from the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez. His doctoral dissertation was entitled: 'Benthic Habitat Mapping and Bio-Optical Characterization La Parguera Marine Reserve using Passive and Active Remote Sensing Data'. He has worked in multiple industries including academia,government and private sector, performing duties as an environmental consultant, research scientist, fish and wildlife biologist in government agencies dedicated to conservation, and developer of information systems technology in environmental science and infrastructure management. Dr. Hernandez is currently a collaborator of the NOAA NESDIS STAR Coral Reef Watch Ocean Color Projects and the US Coral Reef Task Force Guanica watershed management. He has also been collecting bio-optical and water quality data in La Parguera and the Guanica area for the past 6 years.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Lexis Advance Update for NOAA – Getting Specific Research Results
Presenter(s): Brenna Clanton, LexisNexis
Date & Time: 3 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/PdQaM6 , OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brenna Clanton, J.D., LexisNexis, Federal Government Team

POC: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov) Librarian/Brown Bag Coordinator; Trevor Riley (trevor.riley@noaa.gov), Head of Public Services, NOAA Central Library

Class summary: Learn how to use Lexis more effectively in your research at NOAA! During the session, we will cover:

How to use folders to save more than just documents;
How to easily search for archival materials;
Searching in our court documents;
Using legal news to go beyond the headline;
And using LexisAdvance to assist with reviews of NOAA research.

Remote Access:
Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/PdQaM6 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Bio(s):
Brenna Clanton has been with LexisNexis for over 8 years. She has worked for LexisNexis in both the Chicago and DC offices and has supported both law firm and federal government customers. Originally from Chicago, she attended Chicago-Kent College of Law.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3608131&CustomerID=321 If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/SignLangInterServices.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

4 April 2018

Title: Using Early Life History to Uncover Relationships of Fishes
Presenter(s): Peter Konstantinidis Ph.D, Ichthyoplankton Taxonomist & Curator of Vertebrates,Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Oregon State University
Date & Time: 4 April 2018
1:30 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509, SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 10817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Peter Konstantinidis Ph.D, Ichthyoplankton Taxonomist& Curator of Vertebrates, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR.Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).


Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:
Morphological characters in adult fishes are often of complex nature which makes the identification of their onto genetic origin difficult to impossible. In most cases ontogeny is the only reliable source to identify shared (homologous)structures and therefore the basis to correctly uncover evolutionary relationships. This is where early life history stages come in to play. Complex morphological characters in larval fishes are often in a simple stage of development compared to their adult congeners, therefore the comparison of those characters are easier and more accurate. For most marine fishes however,early life history stages are unknown which makes it equally challenging but also exciting to work with these taxa. I will present examples of my own research to show how significant early life history stages are for phylogenetic studies of fishes.Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Protecting Resources Through Communication and Compliance
Presenter(s): Dr. Kirsten Leong, NOAA Fisheries
Date & Time: 4 April 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC3 - Medium Conference Room - 10817
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kirsten Leong (NOAA Fisheries)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Fisheries Quantitative Ecology and Socioeconomics Training (QUEST) Program; Laura.Oremland@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at: https://goo.gl/yyFoYK

Abstract:
In the NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Region, the majority of management decisions depend on assumptions of compliance with regulations and data based on accurate reporting from fishers of catch, bycatch, and interactions with protected species. A number of systems have been put in place to ensure compliance, e.g. observers, training on reporting, etc. However, there are also concerns, especially when incentives for accurate reporting are low due to situations such as perceptions that reports of higher catch might lead to closure of fisheries, reporting of interactions with endangered species may result in sanctions, or distrust of agencies results in vendors declining to participate in commercial receipts programs. In addition to regulations, there are also best practices for fishing and recreating around protected species. For most of these, there is a desire to encourage compliance with the desired behavior by fishers and recreationists through communications. For these reasons, the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center is exploring social science research in fields such as human behavior and conservation marketing. This presentation will provide an overview of theories and methods from these emerging disciplines as well as updates on research initiatives that apply these methods to promote pro-environmental behaviors crucial to sustainable fisheries management in the region.

Bio(s):
Kirsten Leong is a Social Scientist with NOAA Fisheries at the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. She has worked as a Human Dimensions Specialist in biological conservation of federal lands and waters for over 10 years. She uses social science to better understand how different stakeholders perceive and interact with resources and are affected by potential resource management actions. She has published in areas such as governance, public participation, and managing human and animal behavior. Her current research includes broadening ecosystem-based fisheries models to better represent social-ecological systems, communicating risks about sources of seafood and interactions with protected species, and examining cultural aspects of artisanal fisheries.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

5 April 2018

Title: Mapping Sea Level Rise Impacts to Oregon’s Tidal Wetlands: Tools for Climate Change Adaptation
Presenter(s): Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis OR and Marine Resource Management Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
Date & Time: 5 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Laura Brophy, Director, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, Oregon, USA and Marine Resource Management Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA. Presenting from Corvalis, OR. Coauthor: Michael Ewald, Estuary Technical Group, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, Oregon, USA Project Manager: Fran Recht, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland, Oregon, USA Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
How will sea level rise affect Oregon's tidal wetlands? Starting from a base of recently-completed elevation-based maps of current tidal wetland extent, our team answered this question by mapping potential tidal wetlands of the future under six sea level rise scenarios for all 23 major estuaries on the Oregon coast south of the Columbia River. The results were delivered in person to hundreds of coastal land managers and other stakeholders in a series of local meetings. In this presentation, we summarize results of the study, including the magnitude and significance of the future losses (and in some cases, gains) of tidal wetland area by estuary; the impact of developed areas on potential future tidal wetlands; and a summary of areas prioritized for action planning purposes. Products of this study provide solid information on climate change impacts, along with adaptation guidance, for coastal communities seeking to preserve valued estuarine ecosystems.

Bio(s):
Laura Brophy is the Director of the Estuary Technical Group at the Institute for Applied Ecology in Corvallis, Oregon. She provides leadership in science-based decision support for estuary restoration and conservation priorities in the Pacific Northwest. Her current work focuses on West Coast estuarine habitat mapping and prioritization; analysis of climate change threats and strategic planning for sustainability of Pacific Northwest wetland ecosystems; and effectiveness monitoring at Oregon's largest tidal wetland restoration projects.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: An abundance of anchovies and other perspectives on 'salmon food' in the Salish Sea
Presenter(s): Will Duguid, Department of Biology, University of Victoria
Date & Time: 5 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Will Duguid, Department of Biology, University of Victoria

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:


Join Webex: https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D607405942%26UID%3D485714733%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATmUJARtbfkwLTwaiHA8tiq_u6zTZCl6RnvyP5ITwePC-bNSYwdyr-15l9Dw1Q0_4L-oME9PoSItcnB_B2T0XxW0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmdc7ace9e83d3851b3187b42993c64ffc
Meeting number and Access Code: 809 638 766
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207

Abstract:
Small pelagic fish play a critical role in the flow of energy from primary producers and primary consumers to higher trophic levels. Some small pelagic fish species also exhibit dramatic fluctuations in abundance and range, with extent of suitable habitats shifting in response to both short-term variability and long-term trends in climate. Due to their critical position in food-webs, shifts in dominance among small pelagic fish with differing ecology can have important ecosystem-level consequences. Recognizing and understanding such shifts may be challenging where existing fisheries research programs have been developed in the context of a pre-existing ecosystem state. Here I will provide an example of this: the recent increase in Northern Anchovy in the Salish Sea.

Northern Anchovy have been scarce in the Salish Sea for most of the 20th century, and are not generally considered to be an important component of the ecosystem. Since 2014, there has been an increase in the frequency and abundance of anchovy catches in monitoring programs. I will present a synthesis of diverse, but patchy, datasets bearing on the biology and dynamics of anchovy in the Salish Sea, and discuss possible ecological implications of increased anchovy abundance. In this context I will also introduce other salmon " forage fish interaction research ongoing in our lab. My dissertation research focuses on the ecology of juvenile Chinook salmon late in their first marine summer. This work is suggesting some intriguing links between juvenile salmon behaviour and growth, the transition to piscivory (feeding on age-0 herring), and exposure to predation. I will also provide an overview of a program we are developing to work with recreational anglers to sample the diets of adult Chinook and Coho salmon in the Canadian Salish Sea. We are hoping that this program will develop into a long-term initiative to monitor the forage fish community from the perspective of their predators.

Bio(s):
Will is a PhD candidate in the Fisheries Ecology and Marine Conservation Group in the Department of Biology at the University of Victoria, working under Dr. Francis Juanes. He completed an MSc in crab developmental biology in 2009 before switching gears to work in salmon stock assessment and fisheries management with LGL limited on behalf of a number of British Columbia First Nations. He began a PhD program in 2014 investigating fine scale spatial and temporal patterns of habitat use by juvenile Chinook salmon in the Salish Sea.

RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS
Duguid, William, Iwanicki, Thomas, Journey, Meredith, Noel, Amanda, Beckman, Brian and Juanes, Francis. (in press). Assessing indices of growth for field studies of juvenile salmon: an experiment and synthesis. Marine and Coastal Fisheries.

Duguid, William & Juanes, Francis. (2017). Microtrolling: an Economical Method to Nonlethally Sample and Tag Juvenile Pacific Salmon at Sea. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society. 146. 359-369. 10.1080/00028487.2016.1256835.

Duguid, William & Page, Louise. (2011). Biennial reproduction with embryonic diapause in Lopholithodes foraminatus (Anomura: Lithodidae) from British Columbia waters. Invertebrate Biology. 130. 68 - 82. 10.1111/j.1744-7410.2011.00221.x.

Duguid, William. (2010). The enigma of reversed asymmetry in lithodid crabs: Absence of evidence for heritability or induction of morphological handedness in Lopholithodes foraminatus. Evolution & Development. 12. 74-83. 10.1111/j.1525-142X.2009.00392.x.

Duguid, William. & Page, Louise (2009). Larval and early post-larval morphology, growth, and behaviour of laboratory reared Lopholithodes foraminatus (brown box crab). Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 89(8), 1607-1626. doi:10.1017/S002531540900068X

INTERESTED IN MEETING WITH THE MONSTER SEMINAR JAM SPEAKER?
If you are interested in meeting with the speaker, contact Kinsey Frick at kinsey.frick@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 April 2018

Title: Toward seasonal to multi-annual marine biogeochemical prediction using GFDLs Earth System ModelCapes
Presenter(s): Jong-Yeon Park, Princeton University / GFDL
Date & Time: 6 April 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Jong-Yeon Park (Princeton University / GFDL)

Title:
Toward seasonal to multi-annual marine biogeochemical prediction using GFDLs Earth System Model Date,Time, Room: Friday April 6, 2018 at 1pm in NCWCP Rm 2155 Contact: Avichal Mehra - JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4 Meeting number: 900 826 795 Host key: 796253 Meeting password: a3YhdEPN JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3) 1-877-953-0315 1-517-268-7866 (toll number) Leader: 9702437# Participant: 1262920# Can't join the meeting? Contact support here: https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:
While physical ocean prediction systems routinely assimilate observations and produce seasonal to decadal forecasts, ocean biogeochemical (BGC) prediction systems are less mature due to additional challenges. These include insufficient global-scale BGC observations to inform model initialization, uncertainties from both physical and BGC processes in earth system models, and properties of BGC variables that challenge data assimilation approaches (e.g., non-Gaussian, complex patterns of cross-correlation). A first impediment, however, is the high BGC sensitivity to transient momentum imbalances that arise during physical data assimilation. In this study, we develop a strategy to robustly integrate the GFDL's ocean BGC model (i.e. COBALT) with the ensemble coupled-climate data assimilation (ECDA) system used for GFDL's seasonal to decadal global climate predictions. The ocean and atmosphere data constraints in the assimilation system are optimally modified to reduce BGC biases caused by momentum imbalances while retaining the information of observed physical states. We then performed retrospective prediction runs by initializing the model with the output from our ECDA run coupled with BGC model and investigated seasonal to multi-annual prediction skills of nutrient anomalies, oxygen, phytoplankton and zooplankton over 1991 to 2016. We found that BGC variables generally show a higher and longer-term predictability than sea surface temperature although predictability varies regionally and with initialization month. While the predictability results here suggest a promising strategy of using earth system models for future operational BGC prediction systems, assessment of BGC predictions against satellite datasets shows a considerable gap between potential predictability and achieved prediction skills. Opportunities to close this gap will be also discussed. ====== Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar. Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 April 2018

Title: Marine Microplastics Quest
Presenter(s): Ashok Deshpande, Research Chemist, NOAA/NMFS/Habitat Ecology Branch/Sandy Hook, New Jersey. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 10 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ashok Deshpande, Research Chemist, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Habitat Ecology Branch, Sandy Hook, New Jersey. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
This seminar will cover the following topics: polymer history, plastics integration in modern society, environmental concerns and potential effects on fisheries resources, the need for and the examples of chemical characterization of plastics from the littoral and aquatic systems, and the emerging concerns of microplastics in shellfish in wild and in aquaculture.

Bio(s):
Ashok Deshpande has been working as a Research Chemist for the Northeast Fisheries Science Center's James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sandy Hook, New Jersey for about 28 years. His research interests include the application of principles of analytical chemistry in understanding the condition and basic life history of fisheries resources such as chemical contaminant loadings, seafood safety, trophic ecology, habitat use, schooling, and trans-Atlantic migrations. He contributed to and participated in a variety of diverse projects like the characterization of the 12-Mile and 106-Mile Dumpsites, potential causes for the overwintering blue crab mortalities, seafood safety of recreationally caught fish and lobsters in the NY Bight Apex, use of PCB fingerprints in the understanding of habitat use by Young of the year (YOY) bluefish in the NY Bight estuaries, PCB contamination of shortfin mako, PCBs in YOY bluefish in and around the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site, PBDEs in YOY bluefish along the US Atlantic Coast, PCBs in striped bass in the Chesapeake Bay, utility of fatty acid fingerprints in understanding the trophic ecology of striped bass, use of PCB and organochlorine pesticide fingerprints in understanding schooling and trans-Atlantic movements of highly migratory species like the Atlantic bluefin tuna, behavioral effects and condition of YOY bluefish in the contaminated and relatively pristine estuaries, baseline levels of PCBs, pesticides, and PBDEs in YOY bluefish in NY and NJ estuaries in reference to the redistribution of contaminants due to the Super Storm Hurricane Sandy, mercury contamination of the fish and marine mammals, and the characterization of microplastics polymers in the littoral and aquatic environments. He has collaborated with the scientists from academia, minority-serving institutions, and federal and state governments. He has mentored the students at different educational experiences ranging from the high school to undergraduates, graduates, doctoral, and post-doctoral as well as sabbatical guest researchers. The students and the collaborations bring in new energy and fresh ideas, which allowed the expansion of the scope of the research well beyond what would be permitted by the shrinking FTE pool and the decreasing funding support. The field of microplastics is a fairly recent initiative under the Northeast Fisheries Science's consideration. Apparently, the literature, the media, the public, and the political attention to the global plastics issue is incrementally increasing, indicating an urgent and critical need for an in-depth scrutiny for the presence and harmful effects of plastics in the fisheries resources from the field and in the aquaculture, and ultimately the health and safety of the seafood consumers.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: The Ocean Aero Submaran™ an Innovative Hybrid Autonomous Unmanned Underwater & Surface Vehicle (AUUSV)
Presenter(s): Neil Trenaman, Ocean Aero Inc.
Date & Time: 10 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Neil Trenaman, EVP of Strategic Business Development, Ocean Aero, Inc.

POC: William Michaels william.michaels@noaa.gov NOAA Advanced Sampling Technology Program, Director

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3295374176364013827 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
The Ocean Aero Submaran™ is the first hybrid wind and solar powered, Autonomous Unmanned Underwater and Surface Vehicle (AUUSV) designed for long term autonomous ocean observation and data collection. Built for speed, efficiency and maneuverability, the Submaran is powered by a unique composite wing-sail. The combination of wind and solar power enables the Submaran to cover long distances with the navigating ability for extended station keeping and prolonged monitoring. The Submaran has the added versatility of underwater capability. The wing sail folds and retracts allowing the Submaran to quickly submerge to evade detection, and severe weather conditions as well as perform subsurface data collection tasks. The Ocean Aero Submaran provides new autonomous surface and sub-surface sampling capabilities to address:

Environmental sensing and sampling

Remote and protected marine areas monitoring

Marine mammal tracking

Ocean Water Column Sampling

MetOcean data gathering

Persistent situational awareness

Marine security

Cross-domain communications

The presentation will talk to these applications and recent field duration exercises.

Bio(s):
Neil Trenaman is the Executive Vice President of Strategic Business Development at Ocean Aero Inc. and works closely with the CEO and the Executive Management group to develop “go to market” strategies and to successfully execute Ocean Aero's business plans. Neil is also responsible for establishing a national sales team and a network of international channel partners as well as transitioning pre-production technologies into fully productized, commercially viable entities.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. Tuesday's live relay captioning service session http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3608837&CustomerID=321 will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar. If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Heat Waves and Mortality: A Global Perspective
Presenter(s): Eric Lavigne, Ph.D, Air Health Science Division of Health Canada and the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa
Date & Time: 10 April 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Eric Lavigne, Ph.D, Air Health Science Division of Health Canada and the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa

Sponsor(s):
NWS Point of contact for questions and seminar host: Michelle.Hawkins@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Online Access Only;
1. Go tohttps://gts-ee.webex.com/gts-ee/j.php?MTID=mf32da174a1ee0d71581e1f4a43e987a9
2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
3. Enter the meeting password: lastheat
4. Click "Join"
5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.Important Notice: This WebEx service includes a feature thatallows audio and any documents and other materials exchanged or viewed duringthe session to be recorded. By joining this session, you automatically consentto such recordings. If you do not consent to the recording, discuss yourconcerns with the meeting host prior to the start of the recording or do notjoin the session. Please note that any such recordings may be subject todiscovery in the event of litigation.

Abstract:
Heat waves are a critical public-health problem. Climate models projected there will be an increase in the frequency and severity of heat waves. However,evidence about the impacts of climate change on heat wave-related mortality at a global scale is very limited. The aim of this presentation is to presentresults from a study conducted across 20 countries, including Canada, onprojected heat wave-mortality associations under four scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions, with three assumptions for adaptation: no adaptation, partial adaptation, and full adaptation.
About the speaker: Eric Lavigne is an environmental epidemiologist with research interests that encompass both adverse and beneficial effects of the environment on human health. He is particularly interested in the effects of air pollution, climatic conditions, and green space on maternal and child health.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAA science seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 April 2018

Title: Introducing Gulf TREE, a New Resource for Climate Resilience Tools
Presenter(s): Mikaela Heming, Project Coordinator for the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative.
Date & Time: 11 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mikaela Heming, Project Coordinator for the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative. Not presenting, but a part of this work: Renee Collini, Program Coordinator for the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative; Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
Gulf TREE (Tools for Resilience Exploration Engine) is a filter-based search engine designed to match users with relevant climate resilience tools quickly, easily, and confidently. The goal is to make the process of finding a relevant climate resilience tool simpler; Gulf TREE sorts through over 100 tools (with more being added all the time) to help users find one that meets their criteria. The new site, released late February 2018, was created by the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative, Gulf of Mexico Alliance, and the Gulf of Mexico Climate and Resilience Community of Practice. Gulf TREE is relevant for users of all experience levels and across a wide variety of sectors. Input from nearly 200 prospective end-users across the climate resilience spectrum was sought to understand specific issues stakeholders are tackling, questions and needs for tool suitability, and to ensure an intuitive, user-friendly website. The result is a powerful resource for Gulf of Mexico stakeholders. In this seminar, the Gulf TREE approach and process will be presented, the final resource will be reviewed, and lessons learned will be discussed. Feel free to explore the site ahead of time at www.gulfTREE.org.

Bio(s):
Mikaela Heming is the Project Coordinator for the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative. Drawing on her previous experience working with a climate tool for the Northeast Climate Science Center, she took over coordinating Gulf TREE halfway through its inception. She received her B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Massachusetts " Amherst.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Pop-Up Buoys: Developing Low-Cost Instrumentation for Under-Ice Research
Presenter(s): Dan Langis LT, NOAA Corps., Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA. https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/itae/technologies
Date & Time: 11 April 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dan Langis LT, NOAA Corps., Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle, WA.Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:
Conditions just under Arctic sea ice during Winter and Spring months are largely a mystery, but we do know they play a critical role in shaping one of the world's most highly productive ecosystems during the ice-free Summer months. Large ice keels, constantly shifting floes,and broad inaccessibility make data collection under sea ice notoriously difficult. To answer this question, a new under-ice mooring, capable of collecting oceanographic data at the water-ice boundary during these vital periods was designed. The newest generation of instruments will collect daily images; measure temperature, depth, PAR, and fluorescence;and transmit all data to shore using Iridium Short Burst Data. We will discuss how a number of novel design elements have been integrated to create low-cost, high quality instruments and the challenges that have emerged throughout the process. This project is funded by Pacific Marine Environmental Lab's Innovative Technology for Arctic Exploration program with in-kind support from Ecosystems and Fisheries Oceanography Coordinated Investigations.Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Assessing Collaboration Potential in the Saco River Watershed: A Multidisciplinary Graduate Student-Reserve Project
Presenter(s): Kaitlyn Pritchard, Sophia Paul, and Julia Wondolleck,School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan; ChristineFeurt, Wells Reserve, National Estuarine Research Reserve System
Date & Time: 11 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Online
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Kaitlyn Pritchard, Sophia Paul, and Julia Wondolleck,School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan; ChristineFeurt, Wells Reserve, National Estuarine Research Reserve SystemSeminar sponsor: NERRS Science Collaborative, Dwight.Trueblood@noaa.gov


Remote Access:
Please register through GoToWebinar (http://graham.umich.edu/water/nerrs/webinar).

Abstract:
Sophia Paul and KatiePritchard are part of a Master's Project team of four graduate students fromUniversity of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS) workingon a 12-month project with the Wells Reserve to provide recommendations on theformation of a Saco River Watershed Collaborative. Master's Projects areinterdisciplinary capstone experiences that enable U-M SEAS master's studentsto develop solutions to pressing problems faced by real-world clients. WellsNERR, the client for this project, is facilitating an effort to create astakeholder network within the watershed and engaged the student team toconduct a situation assessment in order to assess residents' values andaspirations for the watershed, perceptions of issues, and interest in greatercollaboration. Katie and Sophia will provide an overview of the impetus for theproject, their methods, their findings, and deliverables provided to WellsNERR. Their research supports the creation of a broader stakeholder networkwithin the watershed, which could create more coordinated conservation andeducation efforts.Join us to learn more about how you can leverage a Master's project team for your reserve.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Science to Support Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management of Coral Reef Ecosystems Across the U.S. Pacific Islands
Presenter(s): Rusty Brainard, NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 11 April 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/fddvsB
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Rusty Brainard, Chief, Coral Reef Ecosystem Program, NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC).

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the April EBM/EBFM seminar: https://goo.gl/fddvsB After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
To provide the scientific underpinnings supporting implementation of ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM), the Coral Reef Ecosystem Program of NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center conducts interdisciplinary monitoring and applied research of coral reef ecosystems across >40 U.S. Pacific islands and atolls. Since 2000, we have collected integrated observations to investigate spatial patterns, temporal trends, trophic, biogeochemical, and climate processes, and human interactions influencing the coral reef ecosystems and fisheries to better inform fisheries management and conservation. Integrated ecosystem observations include: benthic habitat mapping, ecological surveys of the diversity, abundance, size, and distribution of reef fishes, corals, other invertebrates, algae, and microbial communities, and physical and chemical oceanographic measurements local reefs to archipelagic scales. Along with fisheries-dependent and socio-economic data, multivariate analyses of these interdisciplinary data streams and on-going development of end-to-end ecosystem models are used to inform archipelagic fisheries ecosystem plans by NOAA, the Western Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Council and State, Territorial, and NGO partners. Specifically, we will discuss how the ecosystem observations and models are being used to generate annual catch limits, ecosystem components, stock and integrated ecosystem assessments, essential fish and critical habitat designations, listing and recovery decisions, and development of climate and ecosystem considerations and indicators.

Bio(s):
Dr. Rusty Brainard has served NOAA for the past 36 years, including his present role leading the Habitat and Living Marine Resources Program of the Ecosystem Sciences Division at NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. Dr. Brainard completed a BS in Marine Science from Texas A&M (1981), and MS in Oceanography (1986) and PhD in Physical Oceanography (1994) from the Naval Postgraduate School. In 2000, he founded the PIFSC Coral Reef Ecosystem Program, an interdisciplinary, ecosystem-based research program that conducts integrated ecosystem observations, long-term monitoring and assessment, and applied research of coral reefs to support ecosystem-based management and conservation. His team monitors the distribution, abundance, diversity, and condition of fish, corals, other invertebrates, algae, and microbes in the context of their diverse benthic habitats, human pressures, and changing ocean conditions.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3608741&CustomerID=321If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/SignLangInterServices.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 April 2018

Title: Landscape Ecology Influences Estuarine Community Dynamics and Service Delivery
Presenter(s): Shelby L. Ziegler, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Morehead City, NC. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD. Co-authors: F. Joel Fodrie, Jonathan H. Grabowski, Christopher J. Baillie, and Lauren A. Yeager
Date & Time: 12 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

One NOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Shelby L. Ziegler, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Morehead City, NC. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD. Co-authors: F. Joel Fodrie, Jonathan H. Grabowski, Christopher J. Baillie, and Lauren A. Yeager

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is available only over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary app works fine.

Abstract:
Biogenic habitats or foundation species can mediate both community structure and ecosystem function. Most coastal biogenic habitats exist as components of functionally connected mosaics, or landscapes, and the spatial arrangement of these habitats can determine the distribution of and interactions between organisms within an ecosystem. For example, seagrass meadows adjacent to salt marsh habitat can act as corridors for predators to access shellfish reef habitat, which could consequently alter predator foraging behavior and prey survival. If a particular habitat is lost or becomes degraded, the integrity of neighboring patches and the ecosystem as a whole can become impaired. Our research focuses on how estuarine habitats such as oyster reefs, seagrass meadows, and salt marshes function across a variety of landscape contexts or settings. We will discuss multiple case studies that examine habitat context and its influence on fish and crustacean communities and ultimately fish production.

About

Presenter(s):
Shelby is a PhD candidate at UNC Chapel Hill's Institute of Marine Sciences working with the fisheries ecology research group. Her interests span the realms of marine community and conservation ecology. Her dissertation research focuses on the drivers influencing how animals and energy move across ecological boundaries at the land-sea interface. Shelby received a B.S. in Biology at the College of William and Mary where her research focused on the how environmental conditions effected the development of marine invertebrates. Prior to pursuing her PhD, Shelby worked as a research technician studying seagrass community ecology at the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences with Dr. J. Emmett Duffy. Thus far her work has led to four peer-reviewed publications. Shelby is interested in pursuing a career in habitat and fisheries conservation

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: Traditional and modern perspectives on herring survival with a Coast Salish perspective
Presenter(s): Tim Kulchyski, Cowichan Tribes, Cowichan Watershed Board
Date & Time: 12 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tim Kulchyski (Q'utxulenuhw), Cowichan Tribes, Cowichan Watershed Board

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Kinsey Frick at kinsey.frick@noaa.gov and Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:

https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D607405942%26UID%3D485714733%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATmUJARtbfkwLTwaiHA8tiq_u6zTZCl6RnvyP5ITwePC-bNSYwdyr-15l9Dw1Q0_4L-oME9PoSItcnB_B2T0XxW0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmdc7ace9e83d3851b3187b42993c64ffc
Meeting number and Access Code: 809 638 766
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
Tim Kulchyski is a biologist for Cowichan Tribes the largest First Nation in British Columbia. Tim is the grandson of late Simon and Violet Charlie who have left a prominent legacy in Cowichan valley. Tim has worked in both the hard science research field working on issues such as contaminants in traditional foods, salmonid near shore habitat studies, predation studies relating to salmonids as examples. The work over the last two decades has also incorporated First Nations traditional knowledge and other wide ranging aspects of the natural world and first nation's existence and introducing modern science perspective to traditional world views and vice versa. Two worlds that can seemingly often collide when not tempered with mediation and an understanding of the two perspectives. This has included a long standing struggle to attain understanding and recognition of resident herring populations throughout the Salish Sea. This includes the need for understanding on herring population dynamics and genetics but also requires perspectives that respect indigenous understandings and views that do not always rely on a modern western linear train of thought. Tim has worked as a biologist, language revivalist, and researcher for 21 years for Hul'q'umi'num' speaking communities.

INTERESTED IN MEETING WITH THE MONSTER SEMINAR JAM SPEAKER?
If you are interested in meeting with the speaker, contact Kinsey Frick at kinsey.frick@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: EconLit Training for NOAA Fisheries
Presenter(s): Greg Weyman, EBSCO
Date & Time: 12 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8059920898355635971
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Greg Weyman, EBSCO Regional Sales Manager-Federal Government and Corporate Associations

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library. For questions about EconLit access contact: library.reference@noaa.gov; Host is Judith Salter, Librarian (judith.salter@noaa.gov).

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8059920898355635971 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract/Training Description: EBSCO Information Services will be conducting an on-site training seminar for the research database EconLit w. Full Text. Training will include how to access EconLit w. Full Text from within NOAA as well as searching, retrieving, saving and sharing relevant content.

EconLit with Full Text is the most reliable full-text source for economic research, this database offers full text for hundreds of journals including the American Economic Association journals with no embargo. In addition to full-text coverage, the database contains indexing and abstracts for economic journals.

Content Includes:

More than 670 full-text journals

15 full-text books, including The Handbook of World Trade

All of the indexing available in EconLit

Subjects Include:

Capital markets

Country studies

Econometrics

Economic forecasting

Environmental economics

Government regulations

Labor economics

Monetary theory

Urban economics

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3610162&CustomerID=321 If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program:
http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/SignLangInterServices.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 April 2018

Title: PolarWatch, A New NOAA Program to Improve Ocean Remote Sensing Data Access
Presenter(s): Cara Wilson, Environmental Research Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Monterey, CA
Date & Time: 16 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: JPSS Greentech IV Building 7770 Hubble Drive, Lanham MD - Conference Room S561
Description:



Presenter(s):
Cara Wilson, Environmental Research Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Monterey, CAHost: JPSS PROVING GROUND SEMINAR April Science Seminar. POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov877-401-9225pc: 53339716
JOIN WEBEX MEETING

https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m4e141589a02d1d6f04fbc8a526d9db75
Meeting number: 744 886 177
Host key: 180276
Meeting password: Jpss2018!

Abstract:
The PolarWatch program is an end to end solution for providing ocean remote sensing data to diverse end users across disciplines in support of broad applications in the Arctic and Southern Oceans. The primary goals of the program are to enable data discovery, easy access, and broader use of high-latitude satellite data such as surface winds, sea ice properties, ocean color, waves, temperature, salinity, and sea surface height. Initial user engagement indicates that improving data discovery, accessing data in a preferred format, information about emerging and novel data products, assistance determining the most appropriate datasets for a given use case, and training for accessing, visualizing and analyzing data are high priorities for potential users of PolarWatch. PolarWatch leverages existing CoastWatch infrastructure and the data distribution capabilities of SouthWest Fisheries Science Center's Environmental Research Division. The use of ERD's ERDDAP data system facilitates data distribution to existing and emerging Arctic and Antarctic data portals and serves as the underlying data system for the PolarWatch data discovery and access interface.

During the first year of this initiative we have focused on identifying potential polar ocean remote sensing datasets; evaluation of dataset accessibility; testing services, formats, polar projections; and demonstrating dataset integration and distribution. A beta version of the data distribution system and data discovery interface was released on the PolarWatch website in Aug 2017. The discovery and access interfaces will be refined over the next year and work is underway to expand the data catalog. As part of the data curation effort, we are also developing targeted guidance for satellite data
providers on metadata best practices (CF, ACDD) for enhanced data discovery and preparation for publishing data in netCDF format and distribution via ERDDAP and THREDDS. polarwatch.noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 April 2018

Title: Assessing the Population Consequences of Disturbance on Migratory Baleen Whales
Presenter(s): Enrico Pirotta, PhD, Washington State University Vancouver. Presenting from Vancouver, WA
Date & Time: 17 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Enrico Pirotta, PhD, Washington State University Vancouver, WA. Presenting from Vancouver, WA.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is available only over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
Human activities at sea can cause changes in animals' behavior, but their impact on population dynamics is difficult to predict. Female baleen whales acquire most of the energy to sustain migration, gestation and lactation before a calf's birth. Therefore, disturbance that disrupts feeding behavior can negatively affect calf survival through reductions in maternal body condition. This might have long-term repercussions on females' reproductive success and, ultimately, the status of a population. We developed a dynamic state variable model to predict the effects of disturbance on the long-term fitness of migratory baleen whales. We parameterized the framework by integrating data on behavior and physiology of Eastern North Pacific blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus). The effects of different patterns of human disturbance operating in the whales' range were assessed in the context of variable environmental conditions, including periodic climatic oscillations. Our modelling approach can support strategic management decisions regarding marine developments and activities in the face of a rapidly changing environment.

Bio(s):
Enrico Pirotta is a postdoctoral researcher at Washington State University (USA), working with Dr. Leslie New on a variety of projects related to the assessment of the population consequences of disturbance on marine mammals. His work currently focuses on Eastern North Pacific blue whales, northern elephant seals, belugas in the Canadian Arctic, fulmars and golden eagles. Broadly, he is interested in applying quantitative methods to the study of marine predator ecology and their interactions with human activities.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NOAA Institutional Repository: Public Access to Research Results (PARR) Compliance and Journals
Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS and Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library
Date & Time: 17 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, https://goo.gl/KNPTTT, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS and Sarah Davis, MLS, NOAA Central Library

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Institutional Repository Seminar Series, NOAA Central Library.
POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator/Host: Judith Salter judith.salter@noaa.gov; IR Managing Librarian: Jennifer Fagan-Fry (jennifer.fagan-fry@noaa.gov); Sr. Bibliometrics Librarian: Sarah Davis (sarah.davis@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/KNPTTT After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP). Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of NOAA IR seminars.

Abstract:
Welcome to NOAA's Institutional Repository Seminar Series! Each bimonthly NOAA IR seminar will be on a topic related to the NOAA IR. Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. April 2018's topic is looking at Public Access to Research Results (PARR) compliance, journal article requirements, and new developments in the IR. Join us in the library to learn more about how to ensure you are complying with PARR requirements (for both authors and grantees), how the library determines compliance, submitting journal articles, and a brief description of some new IR updates and features.

Bio(s):
Jennifer Fagan-Fry received her MLIS from Catholic University and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2015. Jenn manages the IR ingest. Sarah Davis received her M.L.S from the University of Maryland and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2008. She heads the bibliometrics team and also works with the NOAA Institutional Repository and the library website.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3608729&CustomerID=321 If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/SignLangInterServices.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Sendan email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NOAA's Marine Debris Toolkit for Educators: Incorporating citizen science and community action into an educational setting
Presenter(s): Alyssa Nally, Project Coordinator, NOAA's Ocean Guardian School Program and Sherry Lippiatt, NOAA Marine Debris Program California Regional Coordinator
Date & Time: 17 April 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only - see login info below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Alyssa Nally, Project Coordinator, NOAA's Ocean Guardian School Program and Sherry Lippiatt, NOAA Marine Debris Program California Regional Coordinator

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Seminar host is Seaberry.Nachbar@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Please register for Marine Debris Toolkit for Educators on Apr 17, 2018 12:00 PM PDT at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7753989484183770115
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Brought to you by GoToWebinar, Webinars Made Easy.

Abstract:
The Marine Debris Toolkit serves as a unique collaborative effort between the NOAA Marine Debris Program and the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries to reduce our impact on the ocean through hands-on scientific monitoring, targeted education, and community outreach. Composed of teacher resources, data collection and analysis guidelines, and community engagement and outreach activities, this toolkit empowers students to become ocean stewards by taking action against marine debris on campus, in their local community, and at home. During this presentation, participants will receive an in-depth look into this new education tool.

Bio(s):
Alyssa Nally, coordinator for NOAA's Ocean Guardian School program, is an environmental educator with a background in program development and coordination in both the nonprofit and government sectors. She recently received her master's in Applied Marine and Watershed Science from California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB) where she focused her studies on human impacts, specifically plastic pollution, on marine ecosystems. As an informal educator, she is passionate about utilizing hands-on citizen science activities to inspire the next generation of ocean stewards.

Sherry Lippiatt is the California Regional Coordinator for NOAA's Marine Debris Program. In this role, Sherry works with local partners and key stakeholders to identify regional marine debris priorities and provides expertise and oversight for MDP-funded projects in the state. Sherry also leads the MDP's flagship citizen science program, the Marine Debris Monitoring and Assessment Project. She has a Ph.D. in Ocean Sciences from the University of California Santa Cruz and a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. In 2016, Sherry was selected as a NOAA National Ocean Service Team Member of the Year.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

18 April 2018

Title: Sea Turtle Bycatch in U.S. Longline Fisheries: Do the Regulations Work?
Presenter(s): Yonat Swimmer, Research Fishery Biologist, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: 18 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Yonat Swimmer, Research Fish Biologist, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar series; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is available only over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
Sea turtle bycatch in longline fisheries has been associated with population declines for leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtles, which led to the implementation of U.S. regulations on longline vessels fishing swordfish and tuna in the Pacific and parts of the Atlantic. Our paper (Swimmer et al. 2017) examined 20 years of fisheries observer data and found that with the implementation of regulations, sea turtle bycatch declined in the Atlantic by 40% for leatherback and 61% for loggerhead turtles. For the Pacific shallow set fishery, bycatch declined by 84% and for leatherback and 95% for loggerhead turtles, respectively. Our work used generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs) to assess the probability of expected sea turtle interactions with consideration given to fishing location, hook type, bait type, sea surface temperature, and use of light sticks. GAMMs suggested that the probability of capture was reduced when circle hooks were used. We also found that when fish bait rather than squid was used, capture probabilities were reduced for loggerheads in both the Atlantic and Pacific, and for leatherbacks in the Atlantic only. Our work highlights the value of maintaining a long term (~22 year) data set of observed target and non-target species caught in U.S. longline fisheries. The regulatory actions taken by the U.S. can serve as a model for other countries or organizations, such as regional fisheries management organizations that aim to achieve similar reductions in the bycatch of sea turtles in international longline fisheries.
(Swimmer Y, Gutierrez A, Bigelow K, Barcelo C, Schroeder B, Keene K, Shattenkirk K, Foster D. (2017). Sea Turtle Bycatch Mitigation in U.S. Longline Fisheries. Frontiers in Marine Science, 4. DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2017.00260. (http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2017.00260).

Bio(s):
Yonat is a research fisheries biologist who has been with the NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center since early 2000's. She has been researching means to reduce sea turtle bycatch in fisheries during most of her tenure at NOAA. More recently, Yonat has been active in supporting conservation measures within tuna regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs). Yonat has an MS and PhD from the University of Michigan, and a BA from University of California, Santa Cruz. Yonat is a native Californian who was inspired to pursue marine conservation due to an early connection to Southern California marine ecosystems and a fortunate experience with the late Dr. Ken Norris at UCSC.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The effect of oceanographic variability on the distribution of larval fishes of the Northern Bering and Chukchi Seas
Presenter(s): Libby Loggerwell Ph.D, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 18 April 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Libby Loggerwell Ph.D, Research Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle,WA.Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).


Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:
This work is part of the Arctic Ecosystem Integrated Survey (Arctic EIS) program which is a multi-disciplinary approach to document the state of the ecosystem through oceanography, plankton, and fisheries surveys. Surveys were conducted in the Chukchi and Northern Bering Seas from August to September 2012 and 2013. Ocean currents, phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions were very different between the two years. We investigated whether the distribution of larval fish reflected these differences. The larval fish community was dominated by Arctic cod, Bering flounder, yellowfin sole and capelin. Yellowfin sole and capelin larvae were associated with Alaska Coastal Water, likely because they were advected north from nearshore spawning areas in the Bering Sea. Arctic cod and Bering flounder spawn in the Chukchi Sea and were associated with Anadyr/Bering Sea/Chukchi Sea Water and with Chukchi Winter Water. These water masses had moderate to high nutrient concentrations, so we hypothesize that the result was favorable foraging for larval fishes. Statistical models of the effect of oceanographic variables, phytoplankton and zooplankton distribution were developed to test these hypotheses and to examine the effects of interannual oceanographic variability. Our results increase the knowledge of the mechanistic links between oceanography and the early life history of fish. Ocean processes such as advection and the formation and retreat of sea-ice have been and likely will continue to be impacted by climate change. Because growth and survival of early life stages of fish often drives population change, our results contribute to the understanding of the impacts of climate change on Arctic fish populations. Collaborators on this project include: Morgan Busby, Kathy Mier, Heather Tabisola, and Janet Duffy-AndersonSeminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Sendan email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Science and Leadership - Are They Mutually Compatible?
Presenter(s): Patrick Malone, PhD Director, Key Executive Leadership Program, American University
Date & Time: 18 April 2018
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA HQ SSMC2 - Conference Room - 17250
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Patrick Malone, PhD Director, Key Executive Leadership Program, American University

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
2018 NOAA Hispanic Program, Distinguished Lectures and Mentoring Session. POC for questions: ana.valentin@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Join us remotely from your computer, tablet or smartphone: Link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/493238141 Dial: +1 (312) 757-3129; Access Code: 493-238-141;
Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 493-238-141

Abstract:
Leadership is about relationships and the body of science behind relationships is growing every day. So does that mean science and relationships are compatible? Well……. Let's be candid, it's a struggle! This session explores what makes quality relationships both in and out of the workplace. Participants address the science behind thinking, trust, and kindness in building meaningful and productive connections with those they lead.

Bio(s):
Professor Malone is an Executive-in-Residence in the Department of Public Administration and Policy where he teaches courses in public sector leadership, executive problem solving, organizational analysis, action learning, leadership ethics, and public administration and policy. He also serves as the Director of American University's Key Executive Leadership Programs. He is a frequent guest lecturer on leadership and organizational dynamics in state and federal agencies, professional associations, and universities. He has extensive experience working with federal sector leaders from DHHS, EPA, IRS, USDA, HUD, DHS, and DoD among others. Professor Malone also regularly presents in international forums to government leaders from the Republic of Vietnam, Panama, Poland, Belgium, and Mauritius. His research interests and scholarship include work in public service motivation, leadership, ethics, and organizational behavior. He is one of only thirty researchers in the country certified to score the Subject/Object qualitative research methodology developed at Harvard University.

Dr Malone spent twenty-two years in the Department of Defense where he served in a number of senior leadership and policy roles including as a professor at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; Academic Director; and Dean of Academics for Navy Medicine. His most recent publications include "Thinking Up," “Selfies in the Workplace: Narcissists and the Public Manager,” “Making Assumptions? Try the Power of Inquiry,” “The Challenges That Set Public Service Apart” and “Enhancing Your Leadership by Tapping into Staff Attitudes.” His TED Talk, “Thinking about Time,” is available at http://tedxtalks.ted.com and his co-edited book, The Handbook of Federal Leadership and Administration, was published in November 2016. He is also the host of the monthly podcast “Take It From Key.”

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

19 April 2018

Title: Fire: Modeling and Prediction Issues (part 1)
Presenter(s): Francesca Di Giuseppe, ECMWF, Keren Mezuman, NASA GISS, Sam Rabin, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Etienne Tourigny, Barcelona Supercomputing Center
Date & Time: 19 April 2018
10:00 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: Online Access and CPO Fishbowl SSMC3 Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Francesca Di Giuseppe (ECMWF), Keren Mezuman (NASA GISS), Sam Rabin (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), Etienne Tourigny (Barcelona Supercomputing Center)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR/CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program

Seminar POC: Daniel.Barrie@noaa.gov

REMOTE ACCESS INFORMATION:

- Link: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=ece025cd4c9ac6161fc24042fd0b09483
- Passcode: 20910
- For audio: After logging on to WebEx, click "I will call in" (to hear audio via phone). Make sure to enter both the access code and attendee ID #. If you do not see the option "I will call in," click the "Quick Start" tab in WebEx, and you'll see the option.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Abstracts:

Francesca Di Giuseppe - Fire and weather: How well can we predict fire from weather? how much is weather modified by fires?

The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts is a leading institution in numerical weather prediction. In the last years, thanks to its crucial role in the management of some of the European Copernicus programs, ECMWF has been particularly active in demonstrating the capability of its weather forecasts to support sectoral applications. This effort has invested all time scales from the medium range (up to 10 days forecast) to the seasonal scale (up to 7 months ), including the the subseasonal to seasonal (S2S) range as well. As of today the ECMWF provides several datasets from three different fire danger rating systems; an historical reanalysis dataset, a daily medium range forecast and an extended range forecast. Following the Copernicus general data policy, all data are freely available to any user both public and commercial. The predictability of fire danger from ECMWF forecasts will be revised for few large fires which occurred in the last years

Given the impact that fire emissions from large fires have in modifying the surface radiative budget there is also an interest in including these phenomena into weather forecast. The longer range forecasts is the most likely time scale being affected by fire emissions and the subsequent smoke aerosols transport. Sub-seasonal to seasonal simulations performed prescribing observed fire emissions have already highlighted how the inclusion of this missing component can improve forecast scores up to 4 weeks.In its current setup, ECMWF model does not forecast emissions from fires while allowing these to be prescribed. However the challenge remains to design and implement a fully dynamical fire model which could allow to ignite and extinguish fires as required by long range simulations. In this short presentation I will also present some results from the ultimate challenge of including interactive fires into ECMWF numerical weather prediction system

-----

Keren Mezuman - Title and abstract TBD

-----

Sam Rabin - The Fire Model Intercomparison Project (FireMIP)

After a brief introduction to concepts in global fire modeling, this presentation introduces the goals and structure of the Fire Modeling Intercomparison Project (FireMIP). Preliminary results from the first phase (20th century) of the intercomparison will be presented.

-----

Etienne Tourigny - An observational study of the extreme wildfire events of California in 2017: quantifying the relative importance of climate and weather

The recent extreme wildfire events that occurred during the fall of 2017 in Northern and Southern California made world headlines due to their environmental and economic impacts as well as dramatic and catastrophic images. According to the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), the 2017 fall wildfires in California and the Western U.S. generated financial losses estimated at $18 billion, making the 2017 fire season the most destructive in U.S. history. The factors thought to create such dramatic wildfires at the Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI) in California are numerous: a wetter than average winter of 2016 allowed for vegetation to grow abundantly, followed by the warmest summer in recorded history, which dried the excessive fuel, culminating to hot, dry and windy events known as Santa Ana winds in the South and Diablo winds in the North, which allowed for rapid and uncontrolled fire spread.

We will present an observational study of the extreme wildfire events of 2017 in California. Our goal is to better understand the relative importance of climate and weather in creating the conditions which lead to extreme wildfire events such as those of 2017. The study relies on the well known Canadian Fire Weather Index (FWI). This index has the advantage of being easy to compute and rely on easily obtainable data sources (daily values of temperature, precipitation, relative humidity and wind data), as well as accounting for the influence of wind magnitude and near-surface relative humidity, which are so important for wildfire activity during the peak fire season of California. This fire danger index is better suited than simpler drought indices such as the Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI), which rely solely on daily temperature and precipitation.

As daily data sources we use the ERA-Interim and NARR re-analyses, gridded products covering an extensive period, and burned area is obtained through the MCD64 global burned area product. This allows the study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fire danger, compared to observed burned area, focusing on extreme events such as those of 2017. The study of the variability of FWI and its input data allow to separate the different physical controls on fire occurrence and understand the relative importance of seasonal climate and weather events.

We will also present a framework for seasonal prediction of fire risk based on FWI computed from operational seasonal products.



Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Predicting Whale Acoustic Exposures: Effect of Vessel Management Options
Presenter(s): Adam S. Frankel, Ph.D., Marine Acoustics, Inc. Hawai'i Marine Mammal Consortium.Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD
Date & Time: 19 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150 or via webinar (see login info below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Adam S. Frankel, Ph.D., Marine Acoustics, Inc. Hawai'i Marine Mammal Consortium.Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; hostis Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join anEvent", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Besure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - thetemporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
Vessel traffic management regimes intended to protect baleen whales can have unexpected consequences on whale exposure to underwater noise. Using the Acoustic Integration Model, we simulated whale and vessel movements in Glacier Bay National Park (GBNP). We estimated vessel noise exposures to humpback whales Megaptera novaeangliae while varying the number, speed (13 vs. 20 knots [kn]), and timing of cruise ships, and keeping a constant number, speed, and timing of smaller tour vessels. Using calibrated noise signatures for each vessel and the known sound velocity profile and bathymetry of Glacier Bay, we estimated received sound levels for each simulated whale every 15 s in a 24 h period. Simulations with fast ships produced the highest maximal sound pressure level (MSPL) and cumulative sound exposure levels (CSEL). Ships travelling at 13 kn producedCSEL levels 3 times lower than those traveling at 20 kn. We demonstrated that even in cases where a ship is only a few dB quieter at a slower speed, CSEL islower, but the ship's transit may take substantially longer. Synchronizing shiparrival times had little effect on CSEL or MSPL but appreciably decreased cumulative sound exposure time (CSET). Overall, our results suggest that the most effective way to reduce humpback whale acoustic exposure in GBNP is to reduce the numbers of cruise ships or their speed, although adjusting ship schedules may also be beneficial. Marine protected area managers may find these results illustrative or adapt these methods to better understand the acoustic effects of specific vessel management circumstances.

Bio(s):
As a Senior Scientist for Marine Acoustics, Inc. (http://www.marineacoustics.com), Dr. Frankel is primarily responsible for bioacoustic research, modeling and marine environmental compliance for a wide variety projects. These include at-sea monitoring and mitigation, modeling and predicting acoustic exposure of marine animals to sound, describing whistle characteristics of wild dolphins and testing for behavioral reactions of different whale species to anthropogenic sound. As a founding member of the Hawai‘i Marine Mammal Consortium (http://www.hmmc.org), Dr. Frankel continues his long-term research on humpback and melon-headed whale behavior and bioacoustics off Hawai‘i Island, an interest that developed from conducting playback experiments with humpback whales and using both passive acoustic and visual tracking methods to investigate humpback whale behavior, bioacoustics and distribution.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Sendan email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Hands-on Section 508 Workshop--Basic PDF Editing
Presenter(s): Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS, NOAA OAR/Library
Date & Time: 19 April 2018
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/epT5bL, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jennifer Fagan-Fry, MLIS, NOAA Institutional Repository Manager

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the webinar: https://goo.gl/epT5bL After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter judith.salter@noaa.gov; IR Managing Librarian: Jennifer Fagan-Fry (jennifer.fagan-fry@noaa.gov); Sr. Bibliometrics Librarian: Sarah Davis (sarah.davis@noaa.gov)

Abstract:
Join the NOAA Central Library via webinar: https://goo.gl/epT5bL for the first in our series of hands-on tutorials on Section 508. In this installment, join Jennifer Fagan-Fry (NOAA Institutional Repository Manager) for an introduction to basic PDF editing where she will cover how to fix common accessibility problems in PDF documents such as adding bookmarks, tags, document properties, alternative text, fixing tab order, and more.

Bio(s):
Jennifer Fagan-Fry received her MLIS from Catholic University and has been with the NOAA Central Library since 2015. Jenn manages the NOAA Institutional Repository, provides cataloging/metadata services and works with the library website

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3606686&CustomerID=321 If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/RAC_inter_bus_rules.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Lumping and splitting, waxing and waning: Metapopulation genetics of Pacific herring and its application to management
Presenter(s): Lorenz Hauser, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 19 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lorenz Hauser, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:


https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D607405942%26UID%3D485714733%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATmUJARtbfkwLTwaiHA8tiq_u6zTZCl6RnvyP5ITwePC-bNSYwdyr-15l9Dw1Q0_4L-oME9PoSItcnB_B2T0XxW0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmdc7ace9e83d3851b3187b42993c64ffc
Meeting number and Access Code: 809 638 766
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207

Abstract:
Herring (Clupea spp.) are not only central to many ecosystems, fisheries and cultures, but have also been central to the development of stock concepts starting in the late 19th century. Since then, a variety of models have been proposed, perhaps most significantly the metapopulation concept, although management units are still largely defined as spatially distinct and persistent populations. Metapopulations are characterized by extinction and colonization events, yet empirical data on the interaction between such dynamics and genetic population structure are still scarce. Here, I will provide a review of recent advances in both Atlantic and Pacific herring, specifically concentrating on insights provided by microsatellite analyses, genome sequencing and functional genomics, as well as recent work on herring in the Salish Sea and British Columbia. As suspected by earlier studies, stock separation seems to be determined primarily by spawn timing, though adaptation to salinity is important in Atlantic herring. For management, the question remains whether individual spawning ‘stocklets' should be managed separately, and whether spatial units can adequately capture biological population structure. Another applied question is whether reduction fisheries during the last century not only caused a reduction in biomass but also extinction of specific subpopulation, as suggested by reports of disappeared resident stocks from Canadian First Nations. Given the dynamic nature of herring populations, the most conservative approach may be to conserve processes of recolonization rather than specific populations, although the maintenance of genetic diversity is also crucial.

BIO
Lorenz Hauser originally hails from Austria, which lacks a coastline and major fisheries, but has an interesting fish fauna. After a MS degree at the University of Vienna, he did another one in Bangor, Wales, UK, and then moved on to a PhD on African freshwater clupeids at Swansea University, Wales, UK. After a postdoc in England, Lorenz accepted a faculty position at the University of Washington, where his research interests are centered on the interaction between the environment, species biology and genetic population structure. In pursuing this overarching goal, the research program of his group has developed along three principal themes: The investigation of drivers of genetic population structure in marine species, not only for the identification of self-recruiting populations as units for management and conservation, but also to pinpoint mechanisms of dispersal and demographic variability. The group mainly works on Pacific herring, Pacific cod, rockfishes and Pacific halibut, but also sockeye salmon. The quantification of reproductive success, dispersal and gene flow, primarily in anadromous salmonids, with the aim to identify primary causal mechanisms leading to phenotypic diversity and divergence. This research concentrates on steelhead and sockeye salmon, but the group has also worked on brown rockfish in Puget Sound. The examination of mutation mechanisms, patterns of variability and statistical analyses of molecular data, in order to improve their interpretation in a biological context. In his research, Lorenz always keeps in mind the practical applications of the group's findings. He therefore collaborate extensively with scientists and managers at local, state and federal agencies, as well as with other stakeholder groups. This doesn't only make the science more relevant, but also provides students in the group with contacts and experience in applied management.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

23 April 2018

Title: Drought and Wildfire in the Southern Plains
Presenter(s): s):
Brian Fuchs, Climatologist at National Drought Mitigation Center
Date & Time: 23 April 2018
11:30 am - 12:45 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brian Fuchs, National Drought Mitigation Center as well as state and regional fire specialists

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service and the National Drought Mitigation Center

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for the webinar at
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4268142900674306051

Abstract:

Due to drought severity across the Southern Plains, including portions of Oklahoma, Kansas, New Mexico, Colorado, and Texas, a collaboration of drought, climate and fire experts are providing up-to-date information on the drought and the potential for wildfires. This webinar will provide the latest information on current drought conditions, impacts and outlooks and will also highlight fire vulnerabilities and outlooks for the region. Brian Fuchs, a Climatologist with the National Drought Mitigation Center will lead the webinar. He will be joined by state and regional fire experts. Presenters will be available for questions at the end of the presentations. The webinar will be recorded and made available on drought.gov.

Bio(s):

Brian Fuchs joined the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) in 2005. Prior to joining the NDMC, he worked for 5 years as a Regional Climatologist for the High Plains Regional Climate Center. He has worked extensively with weather/climate data and on the development of the Applied Climate Information System (ACIS) and applied data products. Brian contributes to the production of the U.S. Drought Monitor and he serves as a media contact for climate- and drought-related issues.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

(

Presente
Title: Blossoms and Snow Melt: Spring in the Pacific Northwest
Presenter(s): s):
Philip Mote, Oregon State Climatologist, Jeremy Wolf NWS Weather Forecast Office - Spokane, Sarah Kapnick, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Lee Kalcsits, Washington State University
Date & Time: 23 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Philip Mote, Oregon State Climatologist, Jeremy Wolf NWS Weather Forecast Office - Spokane, Sarah Kapnick, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Lee Kalcsits, Washington State University

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)

Seminar POC for questions: britt.parker@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for the webinar at
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7688943474973460739

Webinar ID: 972-335-003
Access Code: 221-717-031
Participants can use their telephone or computer mic & speakers (VoIP).
United States: +1 (562) 247-8422
Audio PIN: Shown after joining the webinar
Attendee - muted

Abstract:
The NIDIS Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (PNW DEWS) February 2018 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars that provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Climate Recap and Current Conditions
Philip Mote | OR State Climatologist

Seasonal Conditions & Climate Outloo
Jeremy Wolf | WFO Spokane

Snowpack Prediction
Sarah Kapnick | NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

Climatic Resilience for Tree Fruit Production in Washington State
Lee Kalcsits | Washington State University

Bio(s):
Philip Mote is a professor of atmospheric sciences at Oregon State University and heads CIRC's (a NOAA RISA) Climate Science activity. Along with co-leading CIRC, Phil directs the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute (OCCRI) and the Oregon Climate Service, and has helped co-lead several long-term research projects looking into the impacts of climate change. You might also find him rowing along the Northwest's scenic waterways.

Jeremy Wolf is a forecaster and the office climate program manager at the NWS office in Spokane, WA. Jeremy has studied impacts of ENSO across Eastern Washington and north Idaho and has written and published numerous blogs regarding current weather and climate information. Jeremy also utilizes a NWS developed tool LCAT (Local Climate Analysis Tool) to study long term changes in temperature and precipitation, including a study on possible impacts with future fire seasons.

Dr. Sarah Kapnick is a Research Physical Scientist and Deputy Division Leader of the Seasonal to Decadal Variability and Predictability Division at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Her research focuses on the mechanisms controlling the hydroclimate, with an emphasis on: precipitation, extreme storms and mountain snowpack. She is the recipient of the American Geophysical Union Cryosphere Section Early Career Award for 2015 and NOAA OAR Daniel L. Albritton Outstanding Science Communicator Award for 2017. She presently serves as an Associate Editor of Water Resources Research.

Dr. Lee Kalcsits is an assistant professor of tree fruit physiology in the Department of Horticulture at the Washington State University Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center in Wenatchee, Washington. His research program works towards understanding the interactions between environment, horticultural management and genetics of tree fruit. Currently, his work is focused on understanding the mechanisms contributing to calcium-related disorders and the development of symptoms of abiotic stress in apple and, also, developing strategies to mitigate those problems.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

(

Presente

24 April 2018

Title: Exploring Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) for NWP and Situational Awareness Applications
Presenter(s): Sid Boukabara, NOAA/NESDIS
Date & Time: 24 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Sid Boukabara (NOAA/NESDIS)

Title:
ExploringUsing Artificial Intelligence (AI) for NWP and Situational Awareness Applications
Date,Time, Room: Tuesday April17, at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155
Youtube Record

https://youtu.be/n9wQDU4Lf-s
Presentation:
http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2018/Boukabara_20180424_ExploreUseOfAI4NWP_EtAl_v1.pptx

Contact: Sid Boukabara <Sid.Boukabara@noaa.gov>

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4
Meeting number: 900 826 795
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN

JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3)
1-877-953-0315
1-517-268-7866 (toll number)
Leader: 9702437#
Participant: 1262920#

Can't join the meeting? Contact support here:
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:
Exploring Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) for NWP andSituational Awareness ApplicationsApplication to Remote Sensing and Data Assimilation/FusionS. A. Boukabara, E. Maddy, K. Ide, K. Garrett, E. Jones, K.Kumar and N. ShahroudiAbstract" The volume and diversity of environmental data obtained from avariety of Earth-observing systems, has experienced a significant increase inthe last couple years with the advent of high spectral, high- spatial andtemporal resolutions sensors. At the same time, users-driven requirements,especially for nowcasting and short-term forecasting applications but also formedium-range weather forecasting, strongly point to the need for providing thisdata in a consistent, comprehensive and consolidated fashion, combiningspace-based, air-based and surface-based sources, but at higher spatial andtemporal resolutions and with low latency. This trend is expected to continuefurther with the emergence of commercial space-based data from multipleindustry players and the advent of flotillas of small satellites (Cubesats) aswell as new sources of data (such as Internet of Things IoT) to complementtraditional environmental data. Yet, the data volume presents already asignificant challenge. Satellite measurements input to data assimilation algorithmsfor instance, need to be aggressively thinned spatially, spectrally and temporallyin order to allow the products generation, calibration, assimilation andforecast system to be executed. Only a fraction of satellite data gets actuallyassimilated. Taking full advantage of all the observations, allowing moresources of observations to be used for initial conditions setting, and to do itwithin an ever shrinking window of assimilation/dissemination, requiresexploring new approaches for processing the data, from ingest to dissemination.We present in this study the results of a pilot project's effort to usecognitive learning approaches for numerical weather prediction (NWP)applications. The Google's machine learning open-source tool TensorFlow, usedfor many Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, was used to reproduce theperformances of remote sensing and some data assimilation tools (radiativetransfer), with flexibility to extend to other sources such as IoT. Theapproach relies on training a deep-layer neural network on a set of inputs fromNASA's GEOS-5 Nature Run (NR) as well as ECMWF analyses, along with correspondingobservations simulated using theCommunity Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and other forward operators. Thepresent study demonstrates the proof of concept and shows that using AI holdssignificant promise in potentially addressing the vexing issue of computationalpower and time requirements needed to handle the extraordinarily highvolume ofenvironmental data, current and expected. It is found that AI-based algorithmshave dramatically lower execution times, and provide very favorableperformances when compared to traditional approaches.
======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Fire: Modeling and Prediction Issues (part 2)
Presenter(s): Uma Bhatt, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Edward Delgado, Bureau of Land Management, Adam Kochanski, University of Utah, James Randerson, University of California, Irvine
Date & Time: 24 April 2018
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Online Access and CPO Fishbowl SSMC3 Rm 12871
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Uma Bhatt (University of Alaska, Fairbanks), Edward Delgado (Bureau of Land Management), Adam Kochanski (University of Utah), James Randerson (University of California, Irvine)

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR/CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program

Seminar POC: Daniel.Barrie@noaa.gov

REMOTE ACCESS INFORMATION:

- Link: https://cpomapp.webex.com/cpomapp/onstage/g.php?MTID=e7735858817d6e10a0a31f13b27c0ee64
- Passcode: 20910
- For audio: After logging on to WebEx, click "I will call in" (to hear audio via phone). Make sure to enter both the access code and attendee ID #. If you do not see the option "I will call in," click the "Quick Start" tab in WebEx, and you'll see the option.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

Abstracts:

Uma Bhatt - TBD

-----

Edward Delgado - Challenges for Wildland Fire Forecasters

Wildland fire forecasting is a critical part of decision support for managing and suppressing fire on the landscape. Land managers need to this support to: know where fire is likely to occur; identify when and where to position limited fire fighting resources to maximize effectiveness and efficiency; and ultimately, protect life and property. There are challenges to wildland fire forecasting. Wildland fire varies across the country both seasonally and geographically. It is drive not just by the natural elements of weather and vegetation but also by the day-to-day activities of people. Number of ignitions, spread or growth rates, and final size of fires provide some usefulness in accounting but their value in forecasting decreases when factors such as management strategies, values at risk, and resource capabilities enter the equation. Meteorologists must rethink how wildland fire forecasts are made. This will require better definitions of what is being forecast, approaching the problem from the perspective of fire business, and providing scalable products to address spatial and temporal needs.

-----

Adam Kochanski - Recent advancements in smoke modeling using coupled fire-atmosphere model WRF-SFIRE

The United States has entered a new era of increasing wildfire frequency & intensity and worsening fire impacts. The landscape has become more fire-prone as a result of recent climatic change and urban development resulting in steeply rising fire-suppression costs. Yet, fire is a part of the natural environment and fire prevention practices can at times lead to excessive fuel accumulation and catastrophic fires that are difficult to manage. The need for management decisions based on multifaceted analyses of benefits and risks associated with both wildfires and prescribed burns, including smoke impacts calls for new advanced decision support tools that interactively integrate satellite/aerial remote sensing with coupled high-resolution fire-weather modeling.

As the resolution of operational weather prediction products increase, coupled forecasting of fire progression, smoke generation, as well as plume rise, and dispersion becomes feasible. This integrated approach, based on coupled fire-atmosphere models, facilitates simulations in which not only the weather conditions drive fire propagation, but the fire itself also impacts local weather conditions through the fire heat and moisture fluxes released into the atmosphere. However, fire impacts on the weather conditions are not limited to local warming and generation of pyro-convective updrafts inducing inflows into to base of the convective column. The smoke itself proves to be an important factor significantly altering local weather conditions by its impact on the radiative heat budget.

In this presentation, we illustrate general capabilities of WRFX (the integrated forecasting system based on WRF-SFIRE), in terms of simulating plume rise and dispersion. We also present new model developments that extend model capabilities in terms of rendering fire-atmosphere interactions. The existing coupling mechanisms, through the wind field (modified by fire heat and moisture fluxes) and through the fuel moisture (controlled by local the weather conditions), are now extended by radiative smoke impacts. We present selected test cases and compare modeled plume rise to MISR observations. We also show how the new coupling mechanism improves estimates of the incoming solar radiation and the surface temperatures in smoked valleys.

-----

James Randerson - TBD

--

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

26 April 2018

Title: Evaluating methods for estimating mortality of Great Lakes walleye using acoustic telemetry data
Presenter(s): Lisa Peterson, Knauss Fellow, NOAA NMFS, OST
Date & Time: 26 April 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Lisa Peterson, Knauss Fellow, NOAA NMFS, Office of Science and Technology Assessment & Monitoring Division (ST4)

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellow Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (Katie.Rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
The Great Lakes Acoustic Telemetry Observation System (GLATOS) in North America includes millions of tag detections for Lake Erie walleye. These data provide researchers with information about behaviour, habitat use, and population dynamics. Natural mortality as a phenomenon is difficult to observe, but remains a critical component of stock assessments and quota estimation. This project developed methods to estimate mortality using acoustic telemetry detections and evaluated them using a simulation framework based on existing GLATOS data, assuming different scenarios of study design and true mortality rates. Our results should help inform researchers about the accuracy of estimation methods and study designs for determining mortality of fish populations using acoustic telemetry data.

Bio(s):
Lisa Peterson is a Knauss fellow in NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, working with Brett Alger on electronic technologies. Lisa received her B.S. (2011) and M.S (2014) in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University. She is currently finishing up her Ph.D. in the Quantitative Fisheries Center. She has worked on Lake Erie yellow perch and walleye stock assessment models as well as with Great Lakes acoustic telemetry data. She is from Royal Oak, Michigan.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3586366&CustomerID=321 If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/RAC_inter_bus_rules.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Positive or neutral effects of non-native plant species in hybrid ecosystems: The use of songbirds and other observable wildlife as measures of restoration success
Presenter(s): Sandy DeSimone, Audubon California
Date & Time: 26 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sandy DeSimone, Audubon California

Sponsor(s):
FWS and NOAA Restoration Webinar Series, hosts are Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov and Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Abstract:
Sandy DeSimone, will discuss her group's study of the impacts of a non-native ground layer species on an otherwise native ecosystem.

Bio(s):
Born in Indianapolis, Indiana. After receiving a B.S. in Education from Indiana University, I left for the east coast where I worked as an elementary classroom teacher in Boston and Manhattan for three years. I developed an interest in bird watching and, after attending the Audubon Camp on Hog Island, decided to leave teaching. Spent three months as a “naturalist-in-training” at the Sharon Audubon Center in northwest Connecticut then worked at the Center as a teacher/naturalist. Met my husband Peter while banding kestrels and after we got married we lived for five happy years in a two room cabin without indoor plumbing or electricity in a state forest. Plants soon became my passion and after a move to Audubon's Starr Ranch Sanctuary in Orange County, California (where Peter took a position as manager) got my master's degree then Ph.D. working in the rare coastal sage scrub. As soon as I finished my Ph.D., Peter took a chance and hired me to work as education and research director at Starr Ranch. I developed “Starr Ranch Field Ecology Programs,” an innovative approach that integrates ecological research into education. People of all ages come for our programs, taught by biologists with graduate degrees, and have a hands-on experience in simulated or actual field research. I also began five years of research on biology and non-chemical control of a priority non-native plant species, artichoke thistle. Since 1997, we have found a control method and have reduced artichoke thistle cover without herbicides by 95% per stand in 600 of the 720 acres targeted for control. The second year of artichoke thistle control we begin restoration to two rare habitats, coastal sage scrub or needlegrass grassland. It has been a pleasure to hire seasonal field crews composed of recent college graduates from all over the country, who come live in the historic buildings on the Ranch and do the research and physical work of our non-native control and restoration project. Over the years I've won some awards for our unusual conservation projects (US FWS Certificate of Appreciation, Cal-IPC Land Manager of the Year, Audubon Chapter Conservation Award). If you are interested in receiving continuing education credits under SER's Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program, contact Jen Lyndall at certification@ser.org. To receive an e-mail notification when registration opens, send your e-mail address to jennifer_ryan@fws.gov. To access the Restoration Webinar Series recording archive, visit https://nctc.fws.gov/topic/online-training/webinars/restoration.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Spatial variation and cryptic collapses in herring metapopulations
Presenter(s): Daniel Okamoto, Department of Biological Science, Florida State University
Date & Time: 26 April 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Daniel Okamoto, Department of Biological Science, Florida State University

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:

https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D607405942%26UID%3D485714733%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATmUJARtbfkwLTwaiHA8tiq_u6zTZCl6RnvyP5ITwePC-bNSYwdyr-15l9Dw1Q0_4L-oME9PoSItcnB_B2T0XxW0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmdc7ace9e83d3851b3187b42993c64ffc
Meeting number and Access Code: 809 638 766
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207

Abstract:
Spatial mismatches between population dynamics and the scale at which they are managed are pervasive problems in natural resource management. In this work, we explore causes, consequences and solutions for spatial mismatches for Pacific herring - an ecologically, economically, and culturally important forage fish " and present evidence for fine-scale (i.e. within stock) variability in dynamics. While spatial complexity in population dynamics can promote stability at large scales, we show how failing to consider such complexity in management produces cryptic negative consequences by magnifying risk of population collapse at small spatial scales. Such effects asymmetrically impact locally constrained fishers and predators who are more exposed to risks of cryptic collapses. Sustainable and equitable use of spatially complex resources requires either management input at finer scales or more conservative harvests to minimize unforeseen collapses at local scales.

Bio(s):
I study population dynamics with a focus on rocky reef species in temperate systems. I am interested in how environment and species interactions regulate fluctuations in demographics (i.e. recruitment, growth, reproduction & mortality) and how fisheries management impacts dynamics in space and time. These interests require studying dynamics with different approaches (lab and field studies as well as numerical, theoretical and statistical modeling) and at different spatial scales. I enjoy studying processes at the scale of micrometers (i.e. dynamics of sperm-egg interactions during spawning), meters (i.e. predator-prey interactions) to hundreds of kilometers (population and metapopulation scales. Focal taxa include sea urchins, abalone, herring, kelp, and reef fish. I earned a PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology from UC Santa Barbara, and MS in Fisheries from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a BS in Biology from UW. After a post-doc at Simon Fraser University I started a faculty position in the Department of Biological Science at Florida State in January.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

2 May 2018

Title: Nutrient Biogeochemistry of Vatia Bay, American Samoa: Variability, Sources and Effects
Presenter(s): Dr. David Whitall, Senior Scientist and Coastal Ecologist, NOAA/NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Stressor Detection & Impacts Division, Monitoring and Assessment Branch
Date & Time: 2 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. David Whitall, Senior Scientist and Coastal Ecologist, NOAA/NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Stressor Detection & Impacts Division, Monitoring and Assessment Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
Over the past ten years field observations have noted a decrease in healthy coral cover in Vatia Bay, on the island of Tutuila, American Samoa. The cause for this is unknown, but one hypothesis is that nutrient pollution from the local village may be driving the decline. Excess nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) can impact corals directly by lowering fertilization success, and reducing both photosynthesis and calcification rates, or indirectly such as through stimulation of the grown of benthic algae. Declining coral health adversely affects the biodiversity of the Bay and likely decreases ecosystem services. Water samples were collected monthly at sites selected from a stratified random design for analysis for nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, urea, total nitrogen, orthophosphorus, total phosphorus, silica and salinity. Biological surveys found that reef habitat was more degraded in the inner portion of the Bay, which coincides with elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus. However, other stressors (sedimentation and increased turbidity) may also be driving this pattern. Land based contributions of phosphorus and reactive nitrogen can enter the environment from a variety of sources, but in Vatia the most likely sources are piggeries and septic systems. Analysis of water samples for tracers of human waste (caffeine and sucralose) confirmed that human derived nutrients are contributing to the nutrient budget of the Bay. These data are useful not only to enhance our understanding of the role that anthropogenic nutrients play in the biodiversity and ecosystem health of the Bay, but also serve as an important “baseline” against which to measure future change. Current ongoing research will attempt to model the nutrient budget of the watershed that drains the Bay, as well as focus on event sampling to better capture precipitation events.

Bio(s):
Dr. Dave Whitall is a senior coastal ecologist with the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science's Stressor Detection and Impacts Division. His expertise is in aquatic biogeochemistry, and pollution in marine ecosystems. He has been with NOAA since 2003, and has completed research in a diverse range of ecosystems, including Chesapeake Bay, North Carolina estuaries, the Gulf of Mexico, Florida, the U.S. Caribbean and the U.S. Pacific Islands. Prior to joining NOAA he conducted research in New England, the Great Lakes and Antarctica. He holds degrees from Penn State University and the University of North Carolina.

and

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Capelin in the Gulf of Alaska: environmental influences on spatial dynamics and implications for monitoring
Presenter(s): David W. McGowan, Ph.D candidate, University of Washington Seattle, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 2 May 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL, Oceanographer Room (#2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
David W. McGowan, Ph.D candidate, University of Washington Seattle, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, Seattle, WASeminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information (http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/).


Remote Access:
Please join gotomeeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/390878509

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 390-878-509

Abstract:
Capelin (Mallotus villosus) are an important mid-trophic link within marine food webs, yet there is limited information describing fluctuations in their distributions and population abundance in the Northeast Pacific. This study investigated environmental influences on spatial patterns of age-1+ capelin in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Data from two independent,fisheries-oceanographic surveys (the GOAIERP's offshore acoustic-trawl survey and the EcoFOCI late-summer, small-mesh trawl survey) were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models to quantify spatial and temporal variability in distributions and abundances of capelin over the GOA continental shelf during an 8-year period from 2000-2013. Capelin were found to concentrate over or near shallow, submarine banks to the south and east of the Kodiak Archipelago. Interannual fluctuations in abundance occurred in the western GOA, while capelin were observed infrequently in Southeast Alaska. Model results indicated that capelin concentrated in areas associated with increased vertical mixing and enhanced primary production. Mean densities of capelin were not directly related to interannual differences in temperature. Results from this study can be used to predict responses of capelin to climate-related changes to the GOA, and to improve monitoring efforts to detect changes in capelin biomass and availability to predators.
Seminar POC: heather.tabisola@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Sendan email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ocean Futures Explored Using a Worldwide Suite of Ecosystem Models: how ocean acidification is more dramatic than large scale protection or dramatically altering fishing
Presenter(s): Erik Olsen, PhD, Head of Research, Demersal fish research group, Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway
Date & Time: 2 May 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OnenOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Erik Olsen, PhD, Head of Research, Demersal fish research group, Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. Presenting from Woods Hole.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No is code needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - temporary app works fine.

Abstract:
Ecosystem-based management (EBM) of the ocean considers all impacts on and uses of marine and coastal systems. In recent years, there has been a heightened interest in EBM tools that allow testing of alternative management options and help identify tradeoffs among human uses. End-to-end ecosystem modeling frameworks that consider a wide range of management options are a means to provide integrated solutions to the complex ocean management problems encountered in EBM. Here, we leverage the global advances in ecosystem modeling to explore common opportunities and challenges for ecosystem-based management, including changes in ocean acidification, spatial management, and fishing pressure across eight Atlantis (atlantis.cmar.csiro.au) end-to-end ecosystem models. These models represent marine ecosystems from the tropics to the arctic, varying in size, ecology, and management regimes, using a three-dimensional, spatially-explicit structure parametrized for each system.Results suggest stronger impacts from ocean acidification and marine protected areas than from altering fishing pressure, both in terms of guild-level (i.e.,aggregations of similar species or groups) biomass and in terms of indicators of ecological and fishery structure. Effects of ocean acidification were typically negative (reducing biomass), while marine protected areas led to both‘winners' and ‘losers' at the level of particular species (or functional groups). Changing fishing pressure (doubling or halving) had smaller effects on the species guilds or ecosystem indicators than either ocean acidification or marine protected areas. Compensatory effects within guilds led to weaker average effects at the guild level than the species or group level. The impacts and tradeoffs implied by these future scenarios are highly relevant as ocean governance shifts focus from single-sector objectives (e.g., sustainable levels of individual fished stocks) to taking into account competing industrial sectors' objectives (e.g., simultaneous spatial management of energy, shipping,and fishing) while at the same time grappling with compounded impacts of global climate change (e.g., ocean acidification and warming).

Bio(s):
Erik Olsen is the head of the Demersal Fish Research Group (http://www.imr.no/forskning/faggrupper/bunnfisk/en)at the Institute of Marine Research, in Bergen, Norway, (http://www.imr.no/) wherehe has been working since 1999. Born in Sweden to Norwegian and Swedish parents who worked extensively in developing countries Erik grew up and was educated in Bergen, Norway. He studied at the University of Bergen where he received a BSc in biology (1995), MSc in fisheries biology (1997) and a PhD in fisheries biology in (2002). Since completing his PhD Erik has worked as a scientist at the Institute of Marine Research primarily on issues related to ecosystem-based monitoring, assessment and management. He has developed and lead the implementation of ecosystem surveys in the Barents Sea jointly with the Russian scientists from PINRO (http://www.pinro.ru/),as well as transferring the concepts to developing nations like Mozambique and Sudan through surveys and development programs.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

3 May 2018

Title: Macrosystems ecology: Developing a macroscale understanding of ecosystem properties
Presenter(s): Dr. Patricia A. Soranno, Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University
Date & Time: 3 May 2018
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 S State Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Patricia A. Soranno, Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University

Seminar sponsor: NOAA OAR Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
Seminar POC for questions: nicole.rice@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8754042590277678337

Abstract:
Macrosystems ecology is the study of diverse ecological phenomena at the scale of regions to continents and their interactions with phenomena at other scales. This emerging subdiscipline addresses ecological questions and environmental problems at these broad scales. In this talk, I will discuss how empirical macrosystems ecology can help to develop macroscale understanding of ecosystem properties at continental scales by providing the needed understanding of spatial and temporal variation and the multi-scaled controls of that variation. I will describe how we are starting to develop such an understanding of lake nutrients and productivity in thousands of lakes in the upper Midwest and northeastern US using a recently-developed database called LAGOS-NE, which is publicly accessible and includes in situ water quality measurements on almost 10,000 lakes, and ecological context data on all 50,000 lakes in the study area. I will end with a discussion of how such a macroscale understanding can inform important goals of ecology including extrapolation, scaling up, and forecasting.

Bio(s):
Dr. Patricia A. Soranno is a professor at Michigan State University in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. She is a broadly-trained aquatic ecologist who conducts both basic and applied research that integrates freshwater ecosystems into a landscape perspective from local to continental scales. She has spent the last 20 years conducting collaborative research on lakes to build a more formal conceptualization of landscape limnology based on a foundation of landscape ecology and limnology. Further, in collaboration with many biological, terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric scientists, she is helping to identify the critical needs for the emerging discipline of macrosystems ecology which views ecological systems from the very finest to the very broadest scales, is data-intensive and often interdisciplinary, and will be needed to address many ecological problems in the coming decades that are regional to global in nature. She is the founding editor-in-chief for the Association of the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography's newest open-access journal, Limnology & Oceanography Letters.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Defining ecosystem thresholds for human activities and environmental pressures in the California Current
Presenter(s): Jameal Samhouri, Ecosystem Science Program Manager, Conservation Biology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA.Presenting from Seattle.
Date & Time: 3 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jameal Samhouri, Ecosystem Science Program Manager, Conservation Biology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA.
Presenting from Seattle.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Laurie.Bauer@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx app/extension when loggin in - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
The oceans are changing more rapidly than ever before. Unprecedented climatic variability is interacting with unmistakable long-term trends, all against a backdrop of intensifying human activities. What remains unclear, however, ishow to evaluate whether conditions have changed sufficiently to provoke major responses of species, habitats, and communities. We developed a framework based on multimodel inference to define ecosystem-based thresholds for human and environmental pressures in the California Current marine ecosystem. To demonstrate how to apply the framework, we explored two decades of data using gradient forest and generalized additive model (GAM) analyses, screening for nonlinearities and potential threshold responses of ecosystem states (n=9)across environmental (n=6) and human (n=10) pressures. These analyses identified the existence of threshold responses of five ecosystem states to four environmental and two human pressures. Both methods agreed on threshold relationships in two cases: (i) the winter copepod anomaly and habitat modification, and (ii) sea lion pup production and the summer mode of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Considered collectively, however, these alternative analytical approaches imply that as many as five of the nine ecosystem states may exhibit threshold changes in response to negative PDO values in the summer (copepods, scavengers, groundfish, and marine mammals).This result is consistent with the idea that the influence of the PDO extends across multiple trophic levels, but extends current knowledge by defining the nonlinear nature of these responses. This research provides a new way to interpret changes in the intensities of human and environmental pressures as they relate to the ecological integrity of the California Current ecosystem. These insights can be used to make more informed assessments of when and under what conditions intervention, preparation, and mitigation may enhance progress toward ecosystem-based management goals.

Bio(s):
Jameal Samhouri is a quantitative marine ecologist and conservation biologist at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle. Through field experiments, quantitative analysis, and the development of mathematical models, his research focuses on how people's activities influence marine ecosystems, and how changes in marine ecosystems affect people. A fish guy at heart, Jameal's current research areas of interest include ecosystem-based reference points, vulnerability of fish and fishermen to climate change, effects of coastal activities on seagrass community dynamics, and theory and practice in strategic ecosystem restoration and recovery.His current work focuses on the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem, including Puget Sound, but he has also worked in several places throughout the Caribbean studying coral reefs. Jameal joined NOAA Fisheries in 2010 as a research fisheries biologist. Prior to that, he conducted research in several places throughout the Caribbean studying coral reef community dynamics. Jameal holds an A.B in ecology and evolutionary biology from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from UCLA.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

8 May 2018

Title: Heavy Metal on the High Seas: USS Monitor and World War II Shipwrecks off the North Carolina Coast
Presenter(s): Tane Casserley, Research Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, National Ocean Service, NOAA. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring
Date & Time: 8 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Tane Casserley, Research Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, National Ocean Service, NOAA. Presenting at NOAA Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Steve.Gittings@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeetingwebinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone:dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under"Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add confno: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
Situated 16 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary protects the shipwreck of the famed Civil War iron clad, USS Monitor. Over the last 40 years NOAA has been honoring the men of USS Monitor, its legacy with the United States Navy, and its impact on world events. This presentation will discuss NOAA's use of cutting edge science to preserve this iconic piece of Civil War history and how these efforts have led to a greater understanding of North Carolina's shipwrecks, in particular how World War II's Battle of the Atlantic came to America's shores. NOAA's goal is to protect these fragile historic resources for future generations, and to preserve the memory of the brave Allied service men and U.S. merchant mariners who fought to rid the world of tyranny. From the U.S. Civil War to World War II, this presentation will highlight NOAA's efforts to protect these fragile national treasures and their history above and below the waves.

Bio(s):
Tane Casserley is a maritime archaeologist who specializes in 19th-century warships and deep-water archaeology. Casserley holds a graduate certificate in maritime archaeology from the University of Hawaii and a Master's degree from the Program in Maritime Studies at East Carolina University. He has led NOAA archaeological expeditions in the Florida Keys, the Great Lakes,California, the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Alaska, and the USS Monitor. He was most recently part of the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary's ongoing research to document the maritime landscape of the WWII Battle of the Atlantic off the coast of North Carolina. Casserley's projects have used technical diving, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), autonomous underwater vehicles(AUVs), and manned submersibles. Subscribe to the OneNOAAScience Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool for MPA Managers
Presenter(s): Sara Hutto of Greater Farallones Association and Lara Hansen of EcoAdapt
Date & Time: 8 May 2018
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Online Virtual Access Only - see access information below
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sara Hutto of Greater Farallones Association and Lara Hansen of EcoAdaptRegister at: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_EPeYfTTzR--fdy8nef2Ffw

Sponsor(s):
Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MarineDebris.info, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).
Seminar POC: Lauren.Wenzel@noaa.gov, Joanne.Flanders@noaa.gov

Abstract:
This North American Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool helps marine protected area managers evaluate the implications of climate change for the habitats of their sites. The tool was created as part of a project on climate assessment and adaptation by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation. It is available in English and Spanish and has three parts (a user guide, a set of blank worksheets, and a booklet containing sample completed worksheets), which used together allow marine protected area managers to conduct a rapid vulnerability assessment and adaptation strategy development process. This webinar will cover: 1) why the tool was created, 2) an overview of the tool (how it works, what it looks like, where to find it), 3) the experience of using the tool, and 4) additional application of the tool. Learn more about the tool here: http://www3.cec.org/islandora/en/item/11733-north-american-marine-protected-area-rapid-vulnerability-assessment-tool-en.pdfWebinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

9 May 2018

Title: Anthropocene Sea Level Change & Sea Level Report Cards: Tracking Trends, Projections, & Processes to Aid Coastal Planning
Presenter(s): John D. Boon III, PhD, Emeritus Professor, Virginia Institute of Marine Science-VIMS, School of Marine Science, College of William and Mary
Date & Time: 9 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John D. Boon, PhD, Emeritus Professor, Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), School of Marine Science, College of William and MaryProject Partners include: Molly Mitchell, Marine Scientist/PhD student, Center for Coastal Resources Management, VIMS; Derek Loftis, Assistant Research Scientist, Center for Coastal Resources Management, VIMS, and David Malmquist, News & Media Director, News & Media Services, VIMS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone:
dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join anEvent", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Besure to install the WebEx plug-in when logging in - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
Mounting evidence of human influence on the earth and its environmental processes has led scientists to propose a new geologic epoch - the Anthropocene - as successor to the Holocene, the latest interglacial epoch that began nearly 12,000 years ago. Among other pronounced changes observed in the atmosphere and oceans during the proposed new epoch, global mean sea level has continued to rise at an accelerated rate. To compare and contrast relative sea level rise and acceleration rates (positive or negative) specific to the new epoch at selected locations within U.S.coastal regions, it is necessary to adopt a common time interval for water level analysis. Here, we adopt a series of intervals beginning in 1969 and continuing through 2004 and successive years thereafter. The results provide asea level history of relative rise rate and acceleration at each location based on water level records obtained from the NOAA National Water Level Observation Network. These histories not only provide a sea level 'report card' for each location but reveal pronounced similarities between locations in regions that are experiencing similar processes of land, ocean and atmosphere exchange.

Bio(s):
John D. Boon III graduated with a B.A. degree in Geology from Rice University in 1962. He attended graduate school at the University of Washington before joining the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey as a commissioned officer in 1963. After resigning his commission in 1969, he was employed as a marine scientist at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science where he continued graduate work leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Marine Science from the College of William and Mary. Joining the faculty of the School of Marine Science as an associate professor in 1975 and full professor in 1987, he taught graduate courses and served as a graduate student advisor and chairman of the Department of Physical Sciences, retiring as an emeritus professor in 2001.Thereafter he became a marine science consultant working on projects in Saudi Arabia, South America and the Caribbean before serving as a NOAA/CO-OPS consultant to the Ocean Systems Test & Evaluation Program from 2007 through 2013.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ecosystem Modeling (EM) for Living Marine Resource (LMR) management
Presenter(s): Howard Townsend, Ph.D., NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 9 May 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar, https://goo.gl/fddvsB, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Howard Townsend, Ecologist with NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Science and Technology and National Ecosystem Modeling Coordinator.

Sponsor(s):
NMFS Ecosystem Based Management/Ecosystem Based Fishery Management Seminar Series (EBM/EBFM) and NOAA Central Library. POC: NMFS EBM/EBFM Environmental Science Coordinator, Peg Brady (peg.brady@noaa.gov); Webinar host: Librarian Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Ecosystem Based Management/EBFM seminar series: https://goo.gl/fddvsB Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
Ecosystem Modeling (EM) for Living Marine Resource (LMR) management includes a range of quantitative representations of part or all of an ecosystem focused on a single LMR, aggregate groups of LMRs, or whole food webs with focal LMRs and the relevant biophysical context of the LMR or LMR group/food web. As such, an EM is a quantitative tool used for resource management that incorporates factors internal and external to a focal LMR or group of LMRs. The tools may be something as simple as a statistical analysis of regression model showing the correlations between a particular fish species and its habitat, or it may be as complex as an end-to-end model that incorporates oceanographic model output and interactions between fished species, fisheries, and protected resources. The important aspect of this definition is that an EM is focused on practical application for simply attempting to understand a system, for understanding trade-offs among ecosystem components, or to set specific management reference points. NMFS has a wide range of major legislative mandates (Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act " MSA, Marine Mammal Protection Act " MMPA, Clean Water Act " CWA, Coastal Zone Management Act " CZMA, Endangered Species Act " ESA) that require a movement towards many levels of ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM). NOAA's mission, vision, and policy statements have promoted and continue to promote movement towards EBFM. Most of the NMFS mandates require the use of the best available science. NMFS is advancing the use of ecosystem models to ensure the best available science is developed and applied for Ecosystem-based Fisheries Management.

Bio(s):
Howard Townsend is an ecologist with NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service/Office of Science and Technology. He serves as the National Ecosystem Modeling Coordinator. In this position, Howard works with modelers across NMFS regions to develop, implement, and review modeling and analytical tools necessary for ecosystem-based fisheries management. Previously Howard worked with the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office focused ecosystem and population modeling for living resource management. His research projects centered around modeling the effects of external factors (e.g., environment, climate, species interactions) on fisheries stocks using ecosystem modeling approaches. In addition, worked on linking ecosystem and socioeconomic models to estimate the societal benefits of natural resources. Howard earned his Ph.D. in Biology from Wake Forest University in 2004. His dissertation work was focused on the population ecology of seabirds in the Galápagos Islands.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3610950&CustomerID=321. If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program: http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/workplace/SignLangInterServices.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

10 May 2018

Title: Tips & Resources for Developing & Sharing Marine Science Stories, from the Tales from the Sea Project
Presenter(s): Stephanie Green, Banting Fellow at Stanford's Center for Ocean Solutions, and Heather Mannix, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement for COMPASS
Date & Time: 10 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stephanie Green, Banting Fellow at Stanford's Center for Ocean Solutions; Kirsten Grorud-Colvert, Marine Ecologist at Oregon State University and Director of the Science of Marine Reserves Project; and
Heather Mannix, Assistant Director of Policy Engagement for COMPASS

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event",
then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx app/extension while logging into the webinar - the temporary Webex application works fine.

Abstract:
Ocean scientists bear witness to scenes of change and discovery that most people will never experience. A growing community of practice is showing that scientists can share these experiences in an engaging way, using a strategy most are already familiar with: storytelling. We will share lessons from our experience leading storytelling trainings with scientists, who have developed and shared compelling science and conservation stories over the past four years at the International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC). Initiated in 2014, the ‘Tales from the Sea' project pairspre-conference trainings with live storytelling events. We will highlight key outcomes and lessons learned from the project, including 1) engaging and equipping scientists in these trainings, 2) facilitating public audience participation at live events where scientist trainees tell their stories, and 3) making these stories available to public and scientific audiences via an online archive. We will also highlight tips and resources for finding your science story.

Bio(s):
Stephanie Green is a Banting Fellow at Stanford's Center for Ocean Solutions, where she leads research on the effects of climate change on ocean food webs. She been an affiliate conservation scientist with the Reef Environmental Education Foundation since 2009, where she leads projects and trainings on marine field monitoring and conservation planning. Her interests and experience span ocean research, policy, science communication, and facilitation.Kirsten Grorud-Colvert is a marine ecologist at Oregon State University and the Director of the Science of Marine Reserves Project. She studies ocean organisms around the world to understand what happens when you protect an area in the ocean. She also works with a global team of marine ecologists, graphic designers, communication specialists, and marine reserve experts to share the science of ocean protection with scientists and non-scientists alikeHeather Mannix is the Assistant Director of Policy Engagement for COMPASS, where she works to facilitate constructive discussion and interaction between scientists and decision makers. Heather has a B.A. fromHood College in Environmental Science and Policy and an M.A. from American University in Global Environmental Policy.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Finnish Meteorological Institute - Weather Forecast Production and NWP Postprocessing
Presenter(s): Jussi Ylhaisi, FMI
Date & Time: 10 May 2018
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Rm 2890
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):

Jussi Ylhaisi - Head of Group, Research Development, FMI
Leila Hieta - Researcher, Research Development, FMI
Mikko Rauhala - Head of Operations, FMI

Title:
Finnish Meteorological Institute - Weather Forecast Production and NWP Postprocessing
Date,Time: Thursday May 10, 1:30-2:30pm
Location: NCWCP Rm 2890
Contact: Jacob Carley jacob.carley@noaa.gov

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4
Meeting number: 900 826 795
Host key: 796253
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN

JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3)
1-877-953-0315
1-517-268-7866 (toll number)
Leader: 9702437#
Participant: 1262920#

Can't join the meeting? Contact support here:
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:

Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) employs ca. 700 people. FMI provides weather forecasts for the public audience and professional customers and is the sole authority in Finland providing official weather warnings and services for other authorities. A part of the applied research and development done in the institute is aimed at improving the data quality of our forecasts. A brief overview of these development projects and our production system is given in this presentation. An emphasis is given to the various postprocessing activities and projects that we currently develop.

The primary local area model (LAM) currently used at FMI is a 10-member HARMONIE-AROME-based MEPS with a 2.5km horizontal resolution. The ensemble consists a unique setup between Nordic countries, where the members jointly share supercomputing and development resources between each other. The LAM is run for the whole Scandinavian domain and different ensemble members are spread over several super computers. FMI has had an open data policy since 2016: Most of our observations and model forecasts are available for the general audience.

In recent years FMI has put substantially more effort in postprocessing of NWP forecasts. As a part of our operative forecasts, we incorporate both various statistical postprocessing frameworks and diagnostic postprocessing algorithms written by our experienced duty forecasters. Our main tool for diagnostic postprocessing is an open-sourced postprocessing package HIMAN, which is currently able to calculate more than 60 diagnostic variables from the output of any NWP model. For statistical postprocessing, we have since February 2017 operatively produced point-based and Kriging-gridded Model Output Statistics (MOS) forecasts over the European domain, based on ECMWF HRES model. As a part of our long-term strategy, we are currently building a grid-based framework for model blending, where we aim to generate a consensus forecast over Scandinavian area through blending our MOS forecasts with the direct model output (DMO) from other NWP models.

Despite having a heterogeneous training sample for our MOS forecasts, the operative verification clearly shows the improvement over the ECMWF DMO forecasts. Our preliminary results for the blended forecasts also show an improvement over the MOS forecasts, which again includes the potential to reduce the data sources the forecaster needs to take into account in shift work.

======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web sitehttp://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook pagehttp://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NGS Webinar Series
Presenter(s): Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 10 May 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: NOS - NGS - GoToMeeting 2 - corbin.training.center, SSMC3 - Large Conference Room - 8836
Description:



Presenter(s):
Dave Zenk, PE, LS, Northern Plains Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Remote Access:
To register for this presentation, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1140650246776286209

This Webinar will be recorded and made accessible approximately one week after the presentation.

Abstract:
This webinar discusses the fundamentals of astronomy, geodesy, geodetic datums, map projections, and GPS. It is intended to serve as a review tool for students and point toward additional sources for more in-depth study.

Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge of this topic is helpful.

To subscribe for future NGS webinar notifications, visit: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USNOAANOS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USNOAANOS_71

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

National Geodetic Survey webinars are held on the second Thursday of the month, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Visit the National Geodetic Survey's Webinar Series Web-site to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Title: What does 'sustainability' mean for forage species?
Presenter(s): Margaret Siple, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington
Date & Time: 10 May 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Margaret Siple, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:

https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D607405942%26UID%3D485714733%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATmUJARtbfkwLTwaiHA8tiq_u6zTZCl6RnvyP5ITwePC-bNSYwdyr-15l9Dw1Q0_4L-oME9PoSItcnB_B2T0XxW0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmdc7ace9e83d3851b3187b42993c64ffc
Meeting number and Access Code: 809 638 766
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207

Abstract:


Ecosystem-based fishery management requires considering the effects of actions on social, natural and economic systems. These considerations are important for forage fish fisheries, because these species provide ecosystem services as key prey in food webs and support valuable commercial fisheries. Forage fish stocks fluctuate naturally, and fishing may make these fluctuations more pronounced. These fluctuations also challenge traditional approaches to management and assessment, including expectations about unfished abundance and recruitment.

My coauthors and I evaluated tradeoffs among a diverse suite of management objectives by simulating outcomes from several harvest strategies on forage fish species. We found that some trade-offs (like those between catches and minimizing collapse duration) were universal among forage species and could not be eliminated by the use of different control rules. We also found that tradeoffs vary among forage fish species, with strong tradeoffs between stable, high catches and high-biomass periods (“bonanzas”) for menhaden- and anchovy-like fish, and counterintuitive tradeoffs for sardine-like fish between shorter collapses and longer bonanzas.

In this talk I will discuss some new considerations for thinking about sustainability in forage fish populations, and what managers might be able to do about it.

BIO

Margaret is a Postdoctoral Research Associate with the Ocean Modeling Forum in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. Her research focuses on feedbacks between anthropogenic drivers and marine ecosystems. Previously she has focused on these feedbacks in the context of species introductions, fishing, and seafood supply chains. With OMF's André Punt and Tessa Francis, she is developing analytical tools to mitigate marine mammal bycatch in international fisheries with different data limitations and management priorities.

Margaret earned her BA from the University of Chicago, her MS from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and her PhD from UW with Dr. Timothy Essington. More information about Margaret can be found on her individual website (http://puntlab.washington.edu/margaret-siple/).

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

15 May 2018

Title: Those scented products you love? NOAA research finds they can cause air pollution.
Presenter(s): Brian C. McDonald, Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, and NOAA Earth System Research Chemical Sciences Division, Boulder, CO. Likely presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring
Date & Time: 15 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brian C. McDonald, Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, and NOAA Earth System Research Chemical Sciences Division, Boulder, CO. Likely presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.
Audio is over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the WebEx plug-in when logging in - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
Have you ever wondered where the emissions from everyday use of chemical products (e.g., personal care products, cleaning agents, inks, coatings, adhesives, and pesticides) end up? It turns out a major fraction of organic chemicals, or volatile organic compounds (VOCs), end up in the atmosphere. In the Los Angeles basin, volatile chemical products (VCPs) now account for around half of the petrochemical VOCs emitted. The VOCs emitted contribute to two of the major components of urban smog: ground-level ozone and fine particles. This talk will discuss recent NOAA research, utilizing advanced chemical instrumentation capable of detecting individual VOCs in the urban atmosphere, including for Los Angeles and New York City.

Bio(s):
Dr. McDonald is a research scientist at the Cooperative Institute of Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado, working at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, CO. Prior to arriving in Colorado, he received his Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering and Master's in Public Policy from the University of California, Berkeley. His expertise is on regional chemical modeling.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

16 May 2018

Title: Measuring ocean waves in sea-ice from synthetic aperture radar imagery and wave-ice interaction
Presenter(s): Justin E Spota, Univ. of Hawaii
Date & Time: 16 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Justin Stopa  (University of Hawaii、Univ. Brest, CNRS, IRD, Ifremer)

Title:
Measuring ocean waves in sea-ice from synthetic aperture radar imagery and wave-ice interaction
Date,Time, Room: Wednesday May 16 at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155
Contact: henrique.alves@noaa.gov

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/j.php?MTID=me96b2f1147f3e3e099c3a491afc5f3b4
Meeting number: 900 826 795
Host key: 796253
Meeting password: a3YhdEPN

JOIN BY PHONE (EMC line 3)
1-877-953-0315
1-517-268-7866 (toll number)
Leader: 9702437#
Participant: 1262920#

Can't join the meeting? Contact support here:
https://ncwcp-meet.webex.com/ncwcp-meet/mc

Abstract:
Satellites provide the unique opportunity to obtain the necessary observations in remote regions as fieldoperations are expensive and difficult. This is particularly true for the under-sampled polar regions. Themarginal ice zone is affected by ocean waves. Yet, measurements of wave heights in marginal ice zonesare limited to very few in situ data. Here we revisit the linear and quasilinear theories of SyntheticAperture Radar (SAR) imaging of waves in the particular case of waves in sea ice. Instead of onlyworking with spectra, we have developed an iterative nonlinear algorithm to estimate phase-resolveddeterministic maps of wave-induced orbital velocities, from which elevation spectra can be derived.Application of this algorithm to Sentinel 1A wave mode images in the Southern Ocean shows that itproduces reasonable results for swells in all directions except when they propagate at a few degrees offthe range direction. The estimate of wave parameters is expected to work best when the shortest wavecomponents, those which cause a pixel displacement of the order of the dominant wavelength inazimuth, can be neglected. Otherwise short waves produce a blurring of the image, increasingexponentially with the azimuthal wavenumber and reducing the estimated wave amplitude. Given theexpected spatial attenuation of waves in ice-covered regions, our deterministic method should applybeyond a few tens of kilometers in the ice, without any correction for short wave effects. In situ datacollected around the ice edge as part of the 2015 SeaState DRI cruise in the Beaufort confirm theprogressive image blurring caused by such short waves, and the apparent reduction in the wavemodulation. The method is tested on two Interferometric Wide swath (IW) mode images from Sentinel1A, and was applied to thousands of wave mode images from S1A and S1B. The present datasetsshould be a useful testbed for the coupled wave-ice interactions models now under development.Automatic application requires a careful screening for ice features that could otherwise be interpretedas wave energy.

======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: New capabilities, opportunities, and challenges using GOES-17 in Alaska
Presenter(s): Jordan Gerth, University of Wisconsin at Madison
Date & Time: 16 May 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jordan Gerth, University of Wisconsin at Madison

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy

Remote Access:
https://accap.uaf.edu/VAWS_GOES17

Abstract:
Following a successful launch, the second new-generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-S, became GOES-17 and is currently in the test position of 89.5 degrees West longitude. This fall, the satellite will begin drifting to its new position at 137 degrees West longitude, where it will begin imaging as the operational GOES-West satellite this November. GOES-West will dramatically improve weather satellite imaging of Alaska, with four times more detail compared to previous generation geostationary weather satellites, even on the North Slope. This will enhance scientific studies and operational weather monitoring of Alaska for nearly a decade to come. This presentation will discuss the value of GOES-17, particularly the unique aspects and challenges for high latitudes.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

17 May 2018

Title: Frankenturtles: The Science behind the Monsters
Presenter(s): Bianca Santos, Knauss Fellow, NOAA OAR/IA
Date & Time: 17 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar



Presenter(s):
Bianca Santos, Knauss Fellow, OAR, International Activities Office.

Seminar sponsor: This seminar is a part of the monthly Knauss Fellow Seminar Series at the NOAA Central Library. POC: Librarian/Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator: Judith Salter (judith.salter@noaa.gov); Knauss Brown Bag Lead/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); 2018 Knauss Fellow POCs: James W.A. Murphy (james.murphy@noaa.gov) and Emily Markowitz (emily.markowitz@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv Registering for one seminar will provide you with access to the full series of Knauss Seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
Each year, hundreds of seemingly healthy turtles wash up dead on the local beaches of Virginia, and cause of mortality cannot be determined. Upon death, sea turtle carcasses float to the surface and act as drifting objects, subject to movement by winds and currents. Forecast models can be used to predict the trajectories of drifting objects, including deceased sea turtles, however the drift characteristics of turtle carcasses are poorly understood. Research was conducted to better understand the drift of dead sea turtles, including the assembly and release of sea turtle carcasses equipped with GPS tags, known as "Frankenturtles." Results from these field experiments were used to develop an oceanographic drift model to identify likely locations of at-sea mortality based on predicted trajectories from stranding locations. Mortality hotspots were identified throughout the lower Chesapeake Bay and compared to human-use datasets to suggest potential causes of mortality.

Bio(s):
Bianca Santos is a Knauss Fellow in the NOAA OAR International Activities Office. She graduated with a B.S. in Marine Vertebrate Biology from Stony Brook University in 2014 and recently completed her M.S. in Marine Science with concentrations in fisheries science and marine policy at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3635878&CustomerID=321 If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Impacts of changing ocean conditions on forage fish community dynamics in the California Current Ecosystem
Presenter(s): Mary Hunsicker, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 17 May 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mary Hunsicker, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:

https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D607405942%26UID%3D485714733%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATmUJARtbfkwLTwaiHA8tiq_u6zTZCl6RnvyP5ITwePC-bNSYwdyr-15l9Dw1Q0_4L-oME9PoSItcnB_B2T0XxW0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmdc7ace9e83d3851b3187b42993c64ffc
Meeting number and Access Code: 809 638 766
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207

ABSTRACT
Forage fish play a central role in the transfer of energy from lower to higher trophic levels. Ocean conditions may influence this energy pathway, and we may expect the response to differ between warm and cool periods in the Northeast Pacific Ocean (NEP). The recent marine heatwave in the NEP provides a unique opportunity to better understand the connection between ocean conditions and forage fish feeding ecology and population dynamics, as well as broader community dynamics. Here I will present findings from an empirical study in which we used stomach content and stable isotope analyses to examine food sources and trophic levels of multiple forage fishes (northern anchovy, sardine, mackerel, herring and smelts) off the Washington and Oregon coasts during warm, average and cool years. Results of the analyses indicate that fish feeding habits varied significantly between cold and warm periods, suggesting that changing ocean conditions are likely to affect the type and quality of prey available to forage fish and that these differences may impact other ecosystem components.

In addition, I will present results from a modeling study in which we summarized information from multiple biological time series from the NEP to develop a State Index that can provide early detection of abrupt community-level changes in response external perturbations, such as the marine heatwave. We developed and applied a Bayesian analog of Dynamic Factor Analysis (DFA) to regional data sets to evaluate changes in mean community state. Using this tool, we 1) tested for ‘black swan' events in shared DFA biological trends, 2) quantified probabilities of shared trends being in a particular stable state, and 3) identified relationships between environmental conditions and the shared biological trends.

BIO
Mary Hunsicker joined NOAA Fisheries in 2015 as a Research Ecologist. Mary received her Ph.D. in Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences from the University of Washington. In addition, she holds a M.S. in Marine and Environmental Sciences from Stony Brook University and a B.S. in Biology from Lafayette College. Mary's research interests focus on the structure and functioning of marine ecosystems and the potential impacts of climate and human activities on ecosystem components. Most recently, she has been using synthetic and analytical approaches to 1) identify nonlinearites and thresholds in relationships between climate and humans drivers and ecological responses, 2) test the utility of early warning indicators to reliably detect abrupt shifts in marine ecosystems, and 3) determine the influence of environmental forcing on species distributions and interactions. Mary's work provides insights into the population dynamics of marine fishes and invertebrates and ocean ecosystem processes that benefit both management and conservation efforts.

RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS
Brodeur, R., Hunsicker, M.E., Hann, A. and Miller, T. Effects of warming ocean conditions on feeding ecology of small pelagic fishes in a coastal upwelling ecosystem: a shift to gelatinous food sources. Marine Ecology Progress Series. In press.

Litzow, M.A. and Hunsicker, M.E..2016. Early warning signals, nonlinearity, and signs of hysteresis in real ecosystems. Ecosphere 7(12):s01614.

Hunsicker, M.E., Kappel, C.V., Selkoe, K.A., Halpern, B.S., Scarborough, C. Mease, L. and Amrhein. A. 2016. Characterizing driver"response relationships in marine pelagic ecosystems for improved ocean management. Ecological Applications 26 (3), 651-663.

INTERESTED IN MEETING WITH THE MONSTER SEMINAR JAM SPEAKER?
If you are interested in meeting with the speaker, contact Kinsey Frick at kinsey.frick@noaa.gov.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

21 May 2018

Title: Southern Plains Drought Webinar
Presenter(s): Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist
Date & Time: 21 May 2018
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service and the National Drought Mitigation Center

Remote Access:
Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5439752805301477378

Abstract:

Due to the severity of drought conditions across the Southern High Plains, a collaboration of experts are providing up-to-date information on drought in the region, which includes portions of Kansas, Colorado, Texas, New Mexico and Oklahoma. In this 21 May webinar, Dave DuBois, New Mexico State Climatologist, will present drought conditions and drought outlook, as well as detailed information on agricultural impacts of the drought. At the end of his presentation, we will take questions.

Bio(s):


Dave DuBois is the New Mexico State Climatologist for New Mexico and located in Las Cruces. As State Climatologist, Dr. DuBois focuses on climate literacy through providing climate information and education to the public, speaking engagements, interviews, school demonstrations, social networking, and tours. He is also the New Mexico Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow (CoCoRaHS) state coordinator. Dr. DuBois chairs the NM Drought Monitoring Workgroup for the NM Governor's Drought Task Force. This group meets once a month to discuss current status of the drought and communicate this to the Governor's staff and to the public. As the State Climatologist, he directs the New Mexico Climate Center. The Center employs students and a technician to operate and maintain an archive of meteorological data collected throughout the state of New Mexico. The Center oversees a network of automated surface weather stations throughout the state with most of these located at university agricultural science centers.

Through his faculty appointment at the Plant and Environmental Sciences Department at New Mexico State University, Dr. DuBois maintains an active research program in air quality and applied climatology, participating in studies to quantify the interactions of climate and pollution, the origins, composition, and transport of dust and other pollutants. Much of his work focuses on issues along the US/Mexico border and part of the Joint Advisory Committee of the Improvement of Air Quality in the Paso del Norte airshed. Dr. DuBois also collaborates closely with the Center for Applied Remote Sensing in Agriculture, Meteorology and Environment at NMSU. Other duties of Dr. DuBois at the university include teaching and student mentoring.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Neural network retrievals of Karenia brevis harmful algal blooms in the West Florida Shelf
Presenter(s): Sam Ahmed, NOAA CREST, City College
Date & Time: 21 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room S561 Greentech IV Building 7700 Hubble Drive Greenbelt MD 20771
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Sam Ahmed
NOAA CREST, City College (CCNY) New York, NY 10031

Host: JPSS PROVING GROUND SEMINAR April Science Seminar. POC: Dr. Mitch Goldberg, mitch.goldberg@noaa.gov

877-401-9225
53339716

JOIN WEBEX MEETING
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m58c6f9398b22ecdbefddd7961411e372
Meeting number: 740 570 640
Host key: 147388
Meeting password: Jpss2018!

Abstract
Water quality retrievals from satellite ocean color measurements are recognized to be challenging in complex coastal waters. We compare retrievals of phytoplankton absorption and hence Karenia brevis harmful algal blooms in the West Florida Shelf using our recently developed neural network (NN) technique with retrievals obtained using other algorithms including OCx, GIOP and Semi-analytical algorithm for both complex and open ocean waters. The NN technique was developed to make up for the lack of a 678 nm florescence band on VIIRS, important for KB HABs retrievals on MODIS. Instead, the NN uses Remote Sensing Reflectance (Rrs) at 486, 551 and 671 nm for VIIRS retrievals. To obtain unambiguous results, satellite retrieval accuracies of KB HABs in the WFS using the NN and different techniques are all compared against all available in-situ measurements that are nearly simultaneous with VIIRS WFS overpasses over the 2012-2017 period. Analysis of these retrieval statistics showed (i) the important impact of relatively short term (5-20 minutes) temporal variations in complex bloom waters on achievable satellite retrieval accuracies, thus placing limitations on their interpretation. They also showed (ii) that particularly for high chlorophyll bloom waters, better retrieval accuracies were obtained with the NN technique, followed by OCx. Likely rationales are that the longer Rrs wavelengths used with the NN technique are less vulnerable to atmospheric correction inadequacies than the deeper blue nm wavelength used with other algorithms, as well potential for less spectral interference with CDOM in more complex waters at the longer wavelengths.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Ocean Acidification in Alaska: Ecosystems and Economies
Presenter(s): Jesscia Cross, Oceanographer, OAR/PMEL
Date & Time: 21 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Jessica N. Cross, Ph.D., Oceanographer, OAR / PMEL

POC: Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); Jessica N. Cross (jessica.cross@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8754305373934016770 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
Alaska is expected to experience the effects of ocean acidification faster and more seriously than many other places around the country, which could have profound impacts on many sectors of the Alaskan economy. Here, we will discuss NOAA's OA observations and forecasts for the state as well as NOAA's contribution to potential decision support and state-wide risk mitigation strategies.

Bio(s):
Jessica N. Cross is an oceanographer from the Pacific Marine Environmental laboratory that focuses on ocean acidification monitoring and research in the Pacific Arctic and along the Alaskan coasts. She is also particularly interested in the development of new technologies and techniques that reduce the cost of collecting data over the expansive and remote Arctic region.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3637391&CustomerID=321

If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NOAA/ESRL Global Monitoring Division Review and Annual Conference (Day 1)
Presenter(s): NOAA OAR Global Monitoring Division presenters
Date & Time: 21 May 2018
12:30 pm - 7:30 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC), 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Day 1 of the ESRL/GMD Laboratory Review and Annual Conference!

Presenter(s):
Agenda (draft) can be found at - https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/review/2018/documents/LabReviewAgenda_2018_v20.pdf

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR, Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2612590650278191618 (Day 1 access only)

Abstract:
The Global Monitoring Division (GMD) would like to invite those interested through the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series to participate remotely in GMD's upcoming Laboratory Review and Annual Conference via Webinar. Please note that the Review and Conference will not follow a typical Seminar Series format but will constitute presentations in varying length over the 3-day meeting. Please refer to the agenda link given in the 'Speaker' line. Those interested in the review may want to catch all of the Review presentations on Monday, as they constitute the core of the review. The GMAC on Tuesday and Wednesday offers a delightful smorgasbord of excellent talks on GMD's themes and related subjects and all are available on the webinar. Take time to decide which you want to see and be sure to catch Dr. John Holdren's Keynote Message on Tuesday morning.

Laboratory Science Reviews are conducted every five years to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted in NOAA's Oceanic and Atmospheric Research laboratories. These reviews ensure that OAR laboratory research is relevant to NOAA's research mission and priorities, is of high quality, and is carried out with a high level of performance. The upcoming review of GMD will assess the quality, relevance, and performance of three primary research areas: (1) Tracking Greenhouse Gases and Understanding Carbon Cycle Feedbacks, (2) Monitoring and Understanding Changes in Surface Radiation, Clouds, and Aerosol Distributions, and (3) Guiding Recovery of Stratospheric Ozone. The review will also address two supporting infrastructures in GMD: (1) Calibrations and Standards and (2) Atmospheric Baseline Observatories.

This Science Review will be coupled with the 46th Global Monitoring Annual Conference (GMAC). This annual conference focuses on long-term monitoring and research results on atmospheric composition, specifically greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases, aerosols, ozone, and radiation at Earth's surface. The GMAC provides a forum in which these observations can be relayed and discussed, and is not limited to ESRL reports, but includes observations by research partners in the overall enterprise, as well as national and international programs.

Bio(s):
ESRL's Global Monitoring Division's mission is, “to acquire, evaluate and make available accurate, long-term records of atmospheric gases, aerosol particles, and surface radiation in a manner that allows the causes and consequences of the change to be understood”. GMD accomplishes this mission primarily through long-term measurements of key atmospheric species at sites spanning the globe, including four fully-equipped Baseline Observatories, ~150 GMD observing sites, and many additional sites operated by national and international partners. GMD's data are used to assess radiative forcing, climate sensitivity, air quality, ozone depletion, arctic processes, climate intervention, and renewable energy opportunities, among other climate and weather-related issues. The data and findings are used by scientists, IPCC, the Ozone Secretariat, EPA, and others to develop and test diagnostic and predictive models and to keep the public, policy makers, and scientists abreast of the current state of our chemical and radiative atmosphere. Without on-going, high quality observations like these, the science community cannot diagnose how the climate system works as climate change unfolds, now and into the far future.

Seminar POC for questions: doug.bell@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

22 May 2018

Title: NOAA/ESRL Global Monitoring Division Review and Annual Conference (Day 2)
Presenter(s): NOAA OAR Global Monitoring Division presenters
Date & Time: 22 May 2018
10:30 am - 6:45 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC), 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Day 2 of the ESRL/GMD Laboratory Review and Annual Conference!

Presenter(s):
Agenda can be found at - https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/gmac/agenda.php

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR, Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3092370245639670530 (Day 2/3 access only)

Abstract:
The Global Monitoring Division (GMD) would like to invite those interested through the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series to participate remotely in GMD's upcoming Laboratory Review and Annual Conference via Webinar. Please note that the Review and Conference will not follow a typical Seminar Series format but will constitute presentations in varying length over the 3-day meeting. Please refer to the agenda link given in the 'Speaker' line. Those interested in the review may want to catch all of the Review presentations on Monday, as they constitute the core of the review. The GMAC on Tuesday and Wednesday offers a delightful smorgasbord of excellent talks on GMD's themes and related subjects and all are available on the webinar. Take time to decide which you want to see and be sure to catch Dr. John Holdren's Keynote Message on Tuesday morning.

Laboratory Science Reviews are conducted every five years to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted in NOAA's Oceanic and Atmospheric Research laboratories. These reviews ensure that OAR laboratory research is relevant to NOAA's research mission and priorities, is of high quality, and is carried out with a high level of performance. The upcoming review of GMD will assess the quality, relevance, and performance of three primary research areas: (1) Tracking Greenhouse Gases and Understanding Carbon Cycle Feedbacks, (2) Monitoring and Understanding Changes in Surface Radiation, Clouds, and Aerosol Distributions, and (3) Guiding Recovery of Stratospheric Ozone. The review will also address two supporting infrastructures in GMD: (1) Calibrations and Standards and (2) Atmospheric Baseline Observatories.

This Science Review will be coupled with the 46th Global Monitoring Annual Conference (GMAC). This annual conference focuses on long-term monitoring and research results on atmospheric composition, specifically greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases, aerosols, ozone, and radiation at Earth's surface. The GMAC provides a forum in which these observations can be relayed and discussed, and is not limited to ESRL reports, but includes observations by research partners in the overall enterprise, as well as national and international programs.

Bio(s):
ESRL's Global Monitoring Division's mission is, “to acquire, evaluate and make available accurate, long-term records of atmospheric gases, aerosol particles, and surface radiation in a manner that allows the causes and consequences of the change to be understood”. GMD accomplishes this mission primarily through long-term measurements of key atmospheric species at sites spanning the globe, including four fully-equipped Baseline Observatories, ~150 GMD observing sites, and many additional sites operated by national and international partners. GMD's data are used to assess radiative forcing, climate sensitivity, air quality, ozone depletion, arctic processes, climate intervention, and renewable energy opportunities, among other climate and weather-related issues. The data and findings are used by scientists, IPCC, the Ozone Secretariat, EPA, and others to develop and test diagnostic and predictive models and to keep the public, policy makers, and scientists abreast of the current state of our chemical and radiative atmosphere. Without on-going, high quality observations like these, the science community cannot diagnose how the climate system works as climate change unfolds, now and into the far future.

Seminar POC for questions: doug.bell@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

23 May 2018

Title: NOAA/ESRL Global Monitoring Division Review and Annual Conference (Day 3)
Presenter(s): NOAA OAR Global Monitoring Division presenters
Date & Time: 23 May 2018
10:30 am - 6:45 pm ET
Location: David Skaggs Research Center (DSRC), 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Day 3 of the ESRL/GMD Laboratory Review and Annual Conference!

Presenter(s):
Agenda can be found at - https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/gmac/agenda.php

Sponsor(s):
NOAA OAR, Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division

Remote Access:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3092370245639670530 (Day 2/3 access only)

Abstract:
The Global Monitoring Division (GMD) would like to invite those interested through the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series to participate remotely in GMD's upcoming Laboratory Review and Annual Conference via Webinar. Please note that the Review and Conference will not follow a typical Seminar Series format but will constitute presentations in varying length over the 3-day meeting. Please refer to the agenda link given in the 'Speaker' line. Those interested in the review may want to catch all of the Review presentations on Monday, as they constitute the core of the review. The GMAC on Tuesday and Wednesday offers a delightful smorgasbord of excellent talks on GMD's themes and related subjects and all are available on the webinar. Take time to decide which you want to see and be sure to catch Dr. John Holdren's Keynote Message on Tuesday morning.

Laboratory Science Reviews are conducted every five years to evaluate the quality, relevance, and performance of research conducted in NOAA's Oceanic and Atmospheric Research laboratories. These reviews ensure that OAR laboratory research is relevant to NOAA's research mission and priorities, is of high quality, and is carried out with a high level of performance. The upcoming review of GMD will assess the quality, relevance, and performance of three primary research areas: (1) Tracking Greenhouse Gases and Understanding Carbon Cycle Feedbacks, (2) Monitoring and Understanding Changes in Surface Radiation, Clouds, and Aerosol Distributions, and (3) Guiding Recovery of Stratospheric Ozone. The review will also address two supporting infrastructures in GMD: (1) Calibrations and Standards and (2) Atmospheric Baseline Observatories.

This Science Review will be coupled with the 46th Global Monitoring Annual Conference (GMAC). This annual conference focuses on long-term monitoring and research results on atmospheric composition, specifically greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases, aerosols, ozone, and radiation at Earth's surface. The GMAC provides a forum in which these observations can be relayed and discussed, and is not limited to ESRL reports, but includes observations by research partners in the overall enterprise, as well as national and international programs.

Bio(s):
ESRL's Global Monitoring Division's mission is, “to acquire, evaluate and make available accurate, long-term records of atmospheric gases, aerosol particles, and surface radiation in a manner that allows the causes and consequences of the change to be understood”. GMD accomplishes this mission primarily through long-term measurements of key atmospheric species at sites spanning the globe, including four fully-equipped Baseline Observatories, ~150 GMD observing sites, and many additional sites operated by national and international partners. GMD's data are used to assess radiative forcing, climate sensitivity, air quality, ozone depletion, arctic processes, climate intervention, and renewable energy opportunities, among other climate and weather-related issues. The data and findings are used by scientists, IPCC, the Ozone Secretariat, EPA, and others to develop and test diagnostic and predictive models and to keep the public, policy makers, and scientists abreast of the current state of our chemical and radiative atmosphere. Without on-going, high quality observations like these, the science community cannot diagnose how the climate system works as climate change unfolds, now and into the far future.

Seminar POC for questions: doug.bell@noaa.gov

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Applications of Conditional Nonlinear Optimal Perturbation to the Predictability Studies
Presenter(s): Mu Mu, CAS Academician
Date & Time: 23 May 2018
10:30 am - 11:30 am ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Professor MuMu (CAS Academician)

Title:
Applicationsof Conditional Nonlinear Optimal Perturbationto the Predictability Studies
Date,Time, Room: Wednesday May 23rd, at 10:30am in NCWCP Rm 2155
Contact: Yuejian Zhu - NOAA Federal <yuejian.zhu@noaa.gov>

presentation
http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2018/Mu-Mu_20180523_Predictability.ppt

Abstract:

In this presentation, I will introduce a nonlinear optimization approach to the predictability studies in atmosphere and oceans, which is conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation(CNOP). For initial perturbation problem,CNOP satisfies a given constraint and has the largest nonlinear evolution at the prediction time, which is a natural generalization of the linear singular vector to the nonlinear regime. When considering perturbations of model parameters, CNOP causes the largest departure from a given reference state at prediction time.

The physical meaning of CNOPdepends on the problems, which could represent the optimal precursors for aweather or climate event onset, for example, the precursors of blockings, northAtlantic oscillation (NAO), and ENSO events, etc. In predictability studies, CNOPstands for the initial error, or parameter errors, that has the largestnegative effect on prediction, and in sensitivity analysis, CNOP is the most unstable(sensitive) mode.

I will briefly present someapplications of CNOP to the ENSO spring predictability barrier, Indian Oceandipole, North Atlantic oscillation (NAO) onset, and ocean circulation ofKuroshio path variations. An interesting phenomenon that the similaritiesbetween optimal precursors and optimally growing initial errors will be shown, andrelated targeted observations issues will be discussed.

The challenges, related tothe calculations of CNOP, to the targeted observations of tropical cyclones, andto ensemble forecasts, will be discussed too.

======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Saildrones in the Bering Sea: Using unmanned surface vehicles to examine relationships between northern fur seals and their prey
Presenter(s): Carey Kuhn, Ecologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 23 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
Description:



Presenter(s):
Carey Kuhn, Ecologist, NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center

POC: Brown Bag Seminar Coordinator/Outreach Librarian: Katie Rowley (katie.rowley@noaa.gov); Carey Kuhn (carey.kuhn@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
Located outside Silver Spring? Please register for the webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1250097832450968833 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
Understanding predator-prey relationships for the depleted northern fur seal is critical to help identify potential causes for the unexplained population decline. However, for wide-ranging marine predators, measuring prey landscapes can be a large undertaking, which is costly in terms of time and resources. In 2016 and 2017, we used autonomous sailing vehicles, Saildrones, to map the fur seals prey landscape while simultaneously tracking the behavior of fur seals at-sea. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the Bering Sea Saildrone missions and describe how the data collected on fish distribution and abundance are being used to examine fine-scale relationships between fur seals and their prey.

Bio(s):
Carey Kuhn is an Ecologist at the Marine Mammal Laboratory, a division of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center. She joined the Marine Mammal Laboratory in 2007 after completing her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolution at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her research uses bio-logging technology examine the at-sea behavior of northern fur seals with the goal of understanding relationships between fur seals and their prey.

Accessibility: Federal Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) service has been reserved for this webinar. The live relay service will need to run in a separate browser window than the webinar: http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3637454&CustomerID=321

If you would like for us to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please let us know five business days in advance. Sign language interpreting services for NOAA's deaf and hard of hearing employees is available through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Southwest Drought Webinar
Presenter(s): Brian Fuchs, National Drought Mitigation Center; Ed Delgado, National Predictive Services Manager, National Wildfire Coordinating Group
Date & Time: 23 May 2018
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Brian Fuchs, National Drought Mitigation Center; Ed Delgado, National Predictive Services Manager, National Wildfire Coordinating Group

Seminar sponsor: NOAA Climate Program Office, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) in partnership with the National Weather Service and the National Drought Mitigation Center

Seminar POC for questions: elizabeth.weight@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3514473860134905859

Abstract:


Due to the severity of drought conditions in the Southwest, a collaboration of experts are providing up-to-date information on drought in the region, including portions of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. In this 23 May webinar, Brian Fuchs, Climatologist with the National Drought Mitigation Center, will present drought conditions, impacts, and outlooks; Ed Delgado, with the National Wildfire Coordinating Group, will present information on wildfire predictions and forecasts for the region. At the end of his presentation, we will take questions.

Bio(s):


Brian Fuchs joined the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) in 2005. Prior to joining the NDMC, he worked for 5 years as a Regional Climatologist for the High Plains Regional Climate Center. He has worked extensively with weather/climate data and on the development of the Applied Climate Information System (ACIS) and applied data products. Brian contributes to the production of the U.S. Drought Monitor and he serves as a media contact for climate- and drought-related issues.

Ed Delgado is the National Program Manager for Predictive Services, located at the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) in Boise, Idaho. Predictive Services is a decision support unit that provides weather and fuels assessments and forecasts for the wildland fire managers across the country. Ed has been with Predictive Services for 17 years and has held his current position since 2011. Prior to Predictive Services, Ed worked for the National Weather Service for 15 years with tours at Fort Worth, Denver, Raleigh, and Greer - the last two tours as a senior forecaster.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.

24 May 2018

Title: Rescheduled to May 31: New Models and Analyses of Deep-sea Corals to Support Essential Fish Habitat Designations in the Gulf of Mexico
Presenter(s): Peter Etnoyer, PhD., Deep Coral Ecology Lab, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting remotely from Charleston, SC
Date & Time: 24 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
RESCHEDULED FOR MAY 31 SEMINAR AS ZACH PROUX ET AL!
Second seminar in a Double-header on Deep-Sea Corals!

Presenter(s):
Peter Etnoyer, PhD., Deep Coral Ecology Lab, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Presenting remotely from Charleston, SC.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
TBD

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The ecology of disease in marine fishes: insights from Pacific herringtem
Presenter(s): Mary Hunsicker, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Date & Time: 24 May 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Paul K. Hershberger, Marrowstone Marine Field Station, U.S. Geological Surveyr

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:

https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D607405942%26UID%3D485714733%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATmUJARtbfkwLTwaiHA8tiq_u6zTZCl6RnvyP5ITwePC-bNSYwdyr-15l9Dw1Q0_4L-oME9PoSItcnB_B2T0XxW0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmdc7ace9e83d3851b3187b42993c64ffc
Meeting number and Access Code: 809 638 766
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207

ABSTRACT
Infectious and parasitic diseases are important drivers in population ecology; however, the effects of diseases are rarely incorporated into marine fish stock assessment models. This omission is largely driven by fundamental incompatibilities between the traditional fish health and population modeling approaches. For example, the fish health field emerged from the need to identify, treat, and prevent diseases in cultured fishes. Although the field continues to be extremely effective at satisfying these objectives, the resulting information is generally not transferrable for understanding disease processes in wild marine fishes or for providing quantitatively useful ecological disease parameters. Work at the USGS - Marrowstone Marine Field Station attempts to bridge these information gaps using holistic and reductionistic approaches to identify the fundamental principles that govern marine host / pathogen systems. These principles are then applied in an ecological context to document the impacts of disease, forecast disease potential, and mitigate disease impacts to populations of wild marine fishes. This approach and its successful application will be discussed in the context of Pacific herring, an important forage species in the North Pacific.

BIO
Paul Hershberger is the Station Leader and a Research Fisheries Biologist at the U.S. Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center - Marrowstone Marine Field Station, a member of the Affiliate Faculty at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences " University of Washington, and former President of the Fish Health Section - American Fisheries Society. His research team includes a group of dedicated federal scientists, post docs, graduate students, and interns who are interested in understanding, forecasting, and mitigating disease impacts to populations of wild marine and anadromous fishes. His scientific approach generally pairs ecological holism with experimental reductionism and incorporates tools and techniques from disparate disciplines including population ecology, fisheries science, virology, parasitology, microbiology, histopathology, molecular biology, etc.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Where Shrews Walk on Water: Diversity by Design for British Columbia South Coast
Presenter(s): Pamela Zevit, British Columbia's South Coast Conservation Program
Date & Time: 24 May 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar - Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Pamela Zevit, British Columbia's South Coast Conservation Program

Sponsor(s):
FWS and NOAA Restoration Webinar Series, hosts are Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov and Nina.Garfield@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register in advance with Jennifer_Ryan@fws.gov

Abstract:
Pamela Zevit will discuss her program's work to fulfill an identified need for science-based guidance for stewards, land managers, and practitioners in habitat protection, restoration, mitigation, and ecosystem management to broaden the potential benefits of ecosystem-based restoration efforts.

Bio(s):
Before turning her attention to a full-time career in 1995 in conservation planning through the British Columbia provincial government and more recently as a consultant, Pamela Zevit studied design and archaeology at the University of Calgary. Pamela is a Registered Professional Biologist (RPBio) in BC, Canada with expertise in biodiversity conservation, landscape ecology and ecosystem restoration and planning. She currently divides her time between the South Coast Conservation Program (SCCP) as their Special Projects Coordinator focusing on conserving species and ecosystems at risk in southwest BC and the Association of Professional Biology as their Director of Advocacy and Outreach working on science communication and professional development programming for natural resource professionals.

If you are interested in receiving continuing education credits under SER's Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program, contact Jen Lyndall at certification@ser.org. To receive an e-mail notification when registration opens, send your e-mail address to jennifer_ryan@fws.gov. To access the Restoration Webinar Series recording archive, visit
https://nctc.fws.gov/topic/online-training/webinars/restoration.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: NWS Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing for May
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, NOAA NWS
Date & Time: 24 May 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Register for Webinar at https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars/nws-briefings
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, NOAA NWS

Sponsor(s):
Monthly Alaska Climate outlook webinar hosted by ACCAP, the Alaska RISA since 2015.

Remote Access:
https://accap.uaf.edu/webinars/nws-briefings

Abstract:
NWS Alaska Region Climate Science and Services Manager Rick Thoman will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for June and the summer season.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

29 May 2018

Title: Advances in Nature-based Risk Reduction. Part 1: Assessing Coastal risk & the economics of climate adaptation on the US Gulf Coast., & Part 2: Risk Reduction & Re-engineering with Coral Reefs
Presenter(s): Borja G. Reguero, PhD, University of California Santa Cruz and The Nature Conservancy, and Michael W. Beck, PhD, TNC and UCSC. Both presenting remotely.
Date & Time: 29 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Borja G. Reguero, PhD, University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) & The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and Michael W. Beck, PhD, TNC & UCSC. Both presenting remotely.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
The first part of the talk will describe the Economics of Coastal Adaptation on the US Gulf Coast. This is a practical framework that national and local officials can use to quantify the risk that climate change poses to their economies, and to minimize the cost of adapting to that risk by identifying significant potential for cost-effective adaptation measures. Coastal flood risk (from climate change and economic exposure growth) is modeled across the United States Gulf of Mexico coast to compare the cost effectiveness of different adaptation measures, including green and grey risk reduction options. We will show how to assess cost and benefits of adaptation measures across the region but also how to apply it to other local scales and other climate risks.

The second part of the presentation will discuss a specific nature-based adaptation project in the Caribbean. We will discuss coral reefs for coastal protection, and show a new methodological approach and engineering case study in Grenada. The shoreline of a beach is the result of a fragile equilibrium between sediment movement, currents and wave conditions. Evidences show coral reefs play a critical role in wave attenuation but relatively little direct connection has been drawn between these effects and impacts on shorelines. Portions of the shoreline of Grenville Bay, Grenada, have seen acute shoreline erosion and coastal flooding. This paper (i) analyzes the historical changes in the shoreline and the local marine; (ii) assesses the role of coral reefs in shoreline positioning through a shoreline equilibrium model first applied to coral reef environments; and (iii) addresses design and begin implementation of a reef-based solution to reduce erosion and flooding.

We will also provide an overview of other related projects from The Nature Conservancy in Climate Risk and Resilience.

Bio(s):
B.G. Reguero is a researcher at the University of California-Santa Cruz, and with The Nature Conservancy. He is a civil engineer with a PhD in Coastal and Marine Engineering and a Master's in Applied Economics. His research focuses on climate risks in coastal areas, with a special emphasis on weather risks, the impacts of climate change on coastal areas, ecosystem-based adaptation and risk reduction. His work is at the interphase of engineering, economics and risk management, with experience in different geographies and with different international organizations, including the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, the Inter-American Development Bank and the World Bank. His work has informed policy through science and applied knowledge. His current area of work, in partnership with the US Geological Survey and The Nature Conservancy, are: risk modeling and risk management; risk financing; the use and design of ecosystems for coastal protection, with a special focus on coral reefs; and the economics associated with climate adaptation.

Dr. Michael W. Beck is the lead marine scientist for The Nature Conservancy and an adjunct Professor in Ocean Sciences at the University of California Santa Cruz, where he is based. Mike works on coastal marine conservation in 5 continents across science, business and policy to bring clear tools and results to decision-makers. Mike focuses on building coastal resilience in the interface between adaptation and conservation, where he works to reduce risks to people, property and nature. Mike has authored more than sixty peer-reviewed science articles. His work covers topics from the role of coral reefs in reducing risks from storms to the effects of people on extinctions of Pleistocene mammals. He has also published numerous popular articles including Op-eds in the Miami Herald, NY Times, Huffington Post and Caribbean Journal. He was a Fulbright Fellow and an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Sydney. He has served on advisory boards and panels for NOAA, EPA and the National Academy of Sciences. In 2012, Mike was selected as a Pew Marine Conservation Fellow.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: The emerging role of the land surface in weather and climate prediction
Presenter(s): Paul Dirmeyer, George Mason University-COLA
Date & Time: 29 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 2155
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Paul Dirmeyer, George Mason University-COLA

Title:
The emerging role of the land surface in weather and climate prediction
Date,Time, Room: Tuesday May 29 at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155
Contact: Holly Norton holly.norton@noaa.gov

presentation:
http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2018/Dirmeyer_20180529_Land_Surface.pdf

Abstract:
Like the ocean, the land surface is a slowly varying manifold relative to the atmosphere that provides predictability and prediction skill across a range of time scales. Although the peak influence of land surface states is in the “subseasonal” time range between 1-3 weeks, significant impact of land, or errors in its representation, begins in forecasts the first morning of simulation. The process chains that link soil moisture, vegetation, snow, and other land states through the energy and water cycles manifest though their effects on the growing daytime boundary layer, cloud formation and convection. Thus, the diurnal cycle is key to assessing and improving model performance related to land-atmosphere interactions. Daily, monthly and seasonal mean skill arising from coupled land-atmosphere feedbacks can only improve by improving the diurnal cycle.



======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Springing into Summer: Current Conditions + The Story of 2011-2017 Historic Drought
Presenter(s): s):
Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center-WRCC & Desert Research Institute-DRI; Alison Stevens, NOAA Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, & Projections -MAPP Program; Amanda Sheffield - NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System-NIDIS; Michael Anderson, California State Climatologist; Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA Climate Prediction Center-CPC; Dennis Lettenmaier, UCLA & California Nevada Applications Program-CNAP, a NOAA RISA; an Marty Hoerling, NOAA Earth Systems Research Lab-ESRL
Date & Time: 29 May 2018
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only (see access information below)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dan McEvoy, Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) & Desert Research Institute (DRI); Alison Stevens, NOAA Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, & Projections (MAPP) Program; Amanda Sheffield - NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS); Michael Anderson, California State Climatologist; Michelle L'Heureux, NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC); Dennis Lettenmaier, UCLA & California Nevada Applications Program (CNAP, a NOAA RISA); Marty Hoerling, NOAA Earth Systems Research Lab (ESRL)

Seminar POC for questions: amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Register for the webinar at
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3301245563415955713

Abstract:

These webinars provide the region's stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

The agenda for this month's webinar (There will be a Q&A session following the presentations):

Drought & Climate Update & Outlook | Dan McEvoy - WRCC, DRI

California Drought 2011-2017: A story about the historic drought [Story map presentation by the creators, NOAA researchers, & partners]
Alison Stevens - NOAA Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, & Projections Program (MAPP)
Amanda Sheffield - NOAA National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)
Michael Anderson - California State Climatologist
Michelle L'Heureux - NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC)
Dennis Lettenmaier - UCLA, California Nevada Applications Program (CNAP, a NOAA RISA)
Marty Hoerling - NOAA Earth Systems Research Lab (ESRL)

Bio(s):

Dan McEvoy is a regional climatologist with the Western Regional Climate Center at the Desert Research Institute. His research interests include advancing drought monitoring technology, seasonal drought prediction, the role of evaporative demand on drought, quality and uncertainty assessment of weather observations, and climate modeling.

Alison Stevens is a communication specialist with NOAA's Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections (MAPP) program. MAPP's mission is to enhance the Nation's and NOAA's capability to understand, predict, and project variability and changes in Earth's climate system.

Amanda Sheffield is a Regional Drought Information Coordinator with the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS). She serves are the program point of contact fo the California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System and is located at Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UC San Diego.

Michael Anderson is the State Climatologist for California with California Department of Water Resources.

Michelle L'Heureux is a meteorologist with NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. Her primary responsibility is to coordinate a team that updates the official status and forecast for the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

Dennis Lettenmaier is a distinguished professor of geography at UCLA with interests in hydrologic modeling and prediction, hydrology-climate interactions, and hydrologic change. He is a part of the California-Nevada Application Program (CNAP), a NOAA RISA team, and the MAPP Drought Task Force.

Marty Hoerling is a research meteorologist with the Attribution and Predictability Assessments Team at NOAA Earth System Research Lab Physical Sciences Division. He is the former lead of the NOAA Drought Task Force.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

(

Presente

30 May 2018

Title: Fishery Ecology: Linking Habitat Research to Sustainable Stocks in the Southeastern US
Presenter(s): Ron Hill, PhD, Acting Chief, Fishery Ecology Branch, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center,, Galveston. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: 30 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ron Hill, PhD, Chief (Acting), Fishery Ecology Branch, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC), Galveston. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access:

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet.
Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:
1-877-708-1667. Enter passcode 7028688#
For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join",
click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web.
Be sure to install the WebEx application while logging in - the temporary app. works fine.

Abstract:
The Fishery Ecology Branch (SEFSC-Galveston) has a long history of research to understand the relationships between fishery productivity and the coastal environment. Operating out of the historic Ft. Crockett facility, our research ranges from salt marsh habitats in Gulf of Mexico estuarine ecosystems to coral reef ecosystems of the US Caribbean. Projects support the missions of numerous NOAA line offices and programs, including Habitat Conservation, the Restoration Center, Sustainable Fisheries, Protected Resources, as well as the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program. Ron will highlight GOM shrimp research, habitat restoration, habitat change, coral reef ecology, and grouper spawning and describe how partnerships and collaborations make these efforts possible.

Bio(s):
Dr. Ron Hill is a Research Fishery Biologist, currently acting as the Fishery Ecology Branch Chief. Dr. Hill earned his PhD at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez Department of Marine Science and then followed the path of the Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship through the Office of Habitat Conservation (Class of '97) and into the Southeast Fisheries Science Center in Galveston, TX. His research is focused on the fishery resources of Caribbean reef systems with particular interest in reef fishes, reef building corals, and effective resource management.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: POSTPONED: Managers, modelers, and measuring the impact of species distribution model uncertainty on marine zoning decisions.
Presenter(s): Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist at NOAA, Currently detailed to the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, University of California Santa Barbara, and Matt Kendall, Marine Biologist, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch
Date & Time: 30 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Bryan Costa, Marine Ecologist at NOAA, Currently detailed to the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, University of California Santa Barbara, and
Matt Kendall, Marine Biologist, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; seminar host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Webinar Access: TBD

Abstract:
Marine managers routinely use spatial data to make decisions about their marine environment. Uncertainty associated with this spatial data can have profound impacts on these management decisions and their projected outcomes. Recent advances in modeling techniques, including species distribution models (SDMs), make it easier to generate continuous maps showing the uncertainty associated with spatial predictions and maps. However, SDM predictions and maps can be complex and nuanced. This complexity makes their use challenging for non-technical managers, preventing them from having the best available information to make decisions. To help bridge these communication and information gaps, we developed a framework to illustrate how SDMs and associated uncertainty can be translated into simple products for managers. We also explicitly described the potential impacts of uncertainty on marine zoning decisions. This framework was applied to a case study in Saipan Lagoon, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Managers in Saipan are interested in minimizing the potential impacts of personal watercraft (e.g., jet skis) on staghorn Acropora species, an important coral assemblage in the lagoon. We used a recently completed SDM for staghorn Acropora to develop simple map products showing the sensitivity of zoning options to three different prediction and three different uncertainty thresholds (nine combinations total). Our analysis showed that the amount of area and geographic location of predicted staghorn Acropora presence changed based on these nine combinations. These dramatically different spatial patterns would have significant zoning implications when considering where to exclude and/or allow jet skis operations inside the lagoon. They also show that different uncertainty thresholds may lead managers to markedly different conclusions and courses of action. Defining acceptable levels of uncertainty upfront is critical for ensuring that managers can make more informed decisions, meet their marine resource goals and generate favorable outcomes for their stakeholders.

Bio(s):
TBD

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

31 May 2018

Title: Pushing the Boundaries: Technology-Driven Exploration of the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): John Bright, Research Coordinator and Unit Diving Supervisor, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Date & Time: 31 May 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
John Bright, Research Coordinator and Unit Diving Supervisor, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean ServiceScience Seminar; co-hosts are Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov and Steve.Gittings@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. Nocode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct application for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary application works fine.

Abstract:
Join the researchers at NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary as they take you on a 'deep dive' into an archaeological expedition during the summer of 2017. Using cutting edge technology through partnerships with the University of Delaware, Michigan Technological University, and Northwestern Michigan College, two historic shipwrecks were discovered and documented 300 feet below the surface of Lake Huron, in the waters just off Presque Isle.

Bio(s):
John Bright is the Research Coordinator and Unit Diving Supervisor forNOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. He holds a BS in Biology and an MA in Maritime Studies from East Carolina University. Prior to his transition to NOAA in 2015, John spent 5 years working with the National Park Services Submerged Resources Center. In this role he conducted archaeological research projects across the federal system, often in partnership with agencies such as the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as well as NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. John specializes in advanced scientific diving techniques, applied GIS, and marine remote sensing.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov withthe word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: No forage fish, no salmon: current status and data gaps for understanding forage fish in the southern Salish Sea
Presenter(s): Todd Sandell, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Date & Time: 31 May 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium: 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Todd Sandell, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

Seminar

Sponsor(s):
For additional information about the NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov.

Remote Access:

https://nwfsc200.webex.com/mw3200/mywebex/default.do?service=1&siteurl=nwfsc200&nomenu=true&main_url=%2Fmc3200%2Fe.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dnwfsc200%26AT%3DMI%26EventID%3D607405942%26UID%3D485714733%26Host%3DQUhTSwAAAATmUJARtbfkwLTwaiHA8tiq_u6zTZCl6RnvyP5ITwePC-bNSYwdyr-15l9Dw1Q0_4L-oME9PoSItcnB_B2T0XxW0%26FrameSet%3D2%26MTID%3Dmdc7ace9e83d3851b3187b42993c64ffc
Meeting number and Access Code: 809 638 766
Join by Phone: (650) 479-3207

ABSTRACT
Pacific herring are a vital component of the marine food web and an indicator species of overall Puget Sound health. These small forage fish are prey for most of the upper trophic levels throughout their life cycle, including Pacific salmon, but historically their role in Puget Sound has been overlooked by the research community. WDFW has completed estimates of spawning biomass for all known Puget Sound herring stocks (21) annually since 1996, and for Cherry Point herring since 1973, making this one of the longest term forage fish datasets available. However, a number of data gaps- including the timing, dispersal and recruitment of larval fish- make it difficult to determine the availability of forage for juvenile salmonids. While herring are the most abundant forage fish in the southern Salish Sea, the abundance of other key species, including surf smelt, sand lance, and, most recently, anchovy, remain largely unexplored. This seminar will focus on our current understanding of forage fish populations in the southern Salish Sea, as well as identifying current data gaps and recent projects aimed at improving our knowledge of forage fish biology and attempts to estimate their biomass.


BIO
Dr. Todd Sandell leads the WDFW's Pacific herring stock assessment efforts in Puget Sound, as well as coordinating studies focused on the biology and ecology of other forage fish species. Prior to 2015, he worked on a variety of juvenile salmonid ecology research projects in the Snohomish River estuary, the San Juan Islands, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca (NOAA), and from 2011-2014 he led a study of the estuarine fish community in Grays Harbor. Before moving to Washington, Todd earned his Ph.D. at the Hatfield Marine Science Center (Oregon State University), where he participated in both the Columbia River plume and GLOBEC studies of the Northern California Current. His graduate work at OSU investigated the disease ecology of juvenile salmon in the nearshore Pacific Ocean and Columbia River estuary. He has worked as a field biologist for 20 years and now serves as a member of the Puget Sound Marine Fish Science Unit at WDFW, where he serves as a liaison to tribal, federal, and non-governmental collaborators.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Assessing the Relationship between Geomorphology and Deep-Sea Coral Community on the West Florida Escarpment
Presenter(s): Zach Proux, MS Candidate, Marine Biology, Grice Marine Lab, College of Charleston. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring.
Date & Time: 31 May 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 9153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Zach Proux, MS Candidate, Marine Biology, Grice Marine Lab, College of Charleston.
Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring. Coauthors: Dr.Leslie Sautter, Associate Professor, Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences, College of Charleston andDr.Peter Etnoyer, Lead Scientist, Deep Coral Ecology Laboratory, National Centers of Coastal Ocean Science, NOAA

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; host is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx before the seminar starts - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
Stony coral and Black coral are foundational ecological groups common on the West Florida Escarpment in the Gulf of Mexico. The distribution of these corals, and most other deep-sea coral, depends primarily on depth, presence of hard substrate, and vertical relief of the seafloor, but less is known about how deep-sea coral assemblages vary with different geomorphologic features. The primary goal of this study is to compare abundance and diversity of deep-sea coral assemblages as they relate to specific geomorphologic features. This study focuses on three Habitat Areas of Particular Concern (HAPC) recommended for regulation by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council with depths between ~200 and 1000 m.High-resolution multibeam sonar data from a survey by NOAA Ship Nancy Foster (2008) are used in concert with historical coral presence data from NOAA's Deep-Sea Coral Research and Technology Program (DSCRTP). Additionally, coral presence-absence data from ROVimages collected by NOAA Ship Nancy Foster in August 2017 and NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in November 2017 and April 2018 are used to enumerate and identify assemblages on flats, mounds, and ridges. Understanding the relationship between specific geomorphologic features and deep-sea coral communities will better inform managers regarding which geographic areas are critical to the protection of these animals. The results of this study will also provide insight into whether the West Florida Escarpment is comprised of fragmented deep-sea coral habitat or iscontinuous, high-quality habitat along the entire feature.

Bio(s):
Zach Proux was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, but raised in a suburb of Chicago. He earned his B.S. in Zoology with a concentration in Marine Biology from Michigan State University in 2016. He is currently in his second year at College of Charleston working towards an M.S. in Marine Biology, working under the guidance of Dr. Leslie Sautter from the College of Charleston and Dr.Peter Etnoyer from NOAA's Deep Coral Ecology Laboratory. His thesis, and the topic of his NOAA presentation, aims to characterize the relationship between geomorphology and deep-sea coral communities on the West Florida Escarpment. Zach hope to finish his M.S. by December 2018 to pursue opportunities in Marine Policy, and eventually move into the environmental consulting industry.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

5 June 2018

Title: Marine Ecological Climate Services: User-Driven Forecasts of Life in the Ocean
Presenter(s): Mark R. Payne, Senior Researcher, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.
Date & Time: 5 June 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mark R. Payne, Senior Researcher, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; hostis Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Besure to install the Webex app when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
Marine scientists have long dreamed of forecasting life in the ocean, but after a century of trying, we have little to show for our efforts. However, recent years have seen a rapid development in the ability of earth system models to predict the physical state of the ocean on seasonal (3-6 months) and even decadal (5-10 years) time scales. Such forecasts are potentially of great value to society, as these are the time-scales where many important decisions are made. Here I review the rapidly emerging field of marine ecological forecasting that aims to generate such predictions of biological variables and develop so-called 'Marine Ecological Climate Services'.I first examine existing ecological forecast products globally to identify the conditions where forecasts have been successfully developed. I then use these lessons to identify 'low-hanging fruit' that can potentially be predicted and illustrate these approaches to prediction using examples of both successes and failures from my own work in Europe, including the distribution of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) and blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou), the productivity of herring (Clupea harengus) and citizen-science driven forecasts of Garfish (Belone belone) migration. Ensuring the usefulness of these forecast products requires close collaboration between actively engaged end-users and researchers and I discuss the importance of co-development. Finally, I look at future opportunities, approaches and applications, including the use of forecast information to support climate adaptation and sustainable development goals.

Bio(s):
Mark R. Payne is a Senior Researcher at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU-Aqua) in Copenhagen, Denmark, whose research examines the impacts of climate change and climate variability on life in the ocean. His work is pioneering the development of Climate Services for monitoring and managing life in the ocean in Europe and involves coupling biological knowledge to climate models to produce predictions that are of direct relevance to end-users. Payne has published over 40 articles in a wide range of scientific journals including Nature and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and is the leader the Climate Services work package within the EU project 'Blue Action'.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

6 June 2018

Title: An introduction to Gulf TREE, a new resource for climate resilience tools
Presenter(s): Mikaela Heming, Project Coordinator, Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative
Date & Time: 6 June 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Mikaela Heming, Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative, Project Coordinator

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library (library.brownbag@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
This event is webinar only, so please register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4252389099283609345

Abstract:
Gulf TREE (Tools for Resilience Exploration Engine) is a filter-based search engine designed to match users with relevant climate resilience tools quickly, easily, and confidently. The new site, developed by the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative, Gulf of Mexico Alliance, and Gulf of Mexico Climate and Resilience Community of Practice, sorts through over 100 tools (with more being added all the time) to help users find one that meets their criteria. Feel free to explore the site ahead of time at www.gulfTREE.org.

Bio(s):
Mikaela is a Project Coordinator specializing in science communication. After working on a climate tool for the DOI Northeast Climate Science Center, she moved south to tackle Gulf TREE for the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative. She received a BS in Environmental Science from the University of Massachusetts" Amherst.

Accessibility: If you would like to request an ASL interpreter in person or via webcam for an upcoming webinar, please apply through NOAA Workplace Management Office's Sign Language Interpreting Services Program.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Monitoring of greenhouse gases and pollutants across an urban area using a light-rail public transit platform
Presenter(s): Dr. Logan Mitchell, University of Utah
Date & Time: 6 June 2018
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Logan Mitchell (University of Utah)

Seminar sponsor: Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (a NOAA RISA team)

Remote Access:
http://whoozin.com/FTN-E6F-A4V4

Abstract:
Urban environments are characterized by both spatial complexity and temporal variability, each of which present challenges for measurement strategies aimed at understanding greenhouse gas emissions and air quality. To address these challenges, we initiated a project in December 2014 to measure greenhouse gases and air pollutants (CO2, CH4, O3, PM2.5, and NO2) by way of a Utah Transit Authority (UTA) light rail vehicle whose route traverses the Salt Lake Valley in Utah on an hourly basis, retracing the same route through commercial, residential, suburban, and rural typologies. Public transit light-rail vehicles present advantages as a measurement platform, including the absence of in-situ fossil fuel emissions, repeated transects across an urban region that provides both spatial and temporal information, and relatively low operating costs. We will discuss this ongoing project and present results that show the influence of emissions from traffic, power plants, gravel pits, rail yards, as well as commercial and industrial point sources. Using measurements of both air pollutants and greenhouse gases we were able to identify specific sources and monitor how they changed over time. We will also discuss the policy relevance of the measurement program and engagement with stakeholders.

These results have just been accepted for publication and the in-press article can be viewed here: doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2018.05.044

Seminar POC for questions: Dr. Franco Montalto (fmontalto@coe.drexel.edu)

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
Title: Dolphin Tales: Studying the Who, When, and Where of Habitat Use
Presenter(s): Dr. Tammy Silva, Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar
Date & Time: 6 June 2018
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Online Participation Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Tammy Silva, Former Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar Seminar sponsor: NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429

Remote Access:
Register for webinar at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3780381950359732994

Abstract:
Dolphin species often play key roles in ecosystems and also use habitats that overlap with areas of human activity. Learn more about when and where dolphin species occur so that the research can inform ecosystem management and mitigate human impacts. This presentation will focus on the biology and ecology of dolphins, current threats, and how technology is helping us learn about their occurrence and distribution. More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

11 June 2018

Title: Field and Numerical Investigations of Coastal Hazards and Nature Based Defenses From Hurricane Storm Surge and Waves in the Chesapeake Bay
Presenter(s): Juan Luis Garzon Hervas, George Mason University
Date & Time: 11 June 2018
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Room 2155, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Ct, College Park, MD 20740, USA
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor EMC seminar

Presenter(s):
Juan Luis Garzon Hervas, George Mason University

Title:
Field and Numerical Investigations of Coastal Hazards and Nature Based Defenses From Hurricane Storm Surge and Waves in the Chesapeake Bay
Date,Time, Room: Monday June 11, at noon in NCWCP Rm 2155
Contact: Roberto Padilla

presentation
http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/presentations/2018/JG_20180611_Coastal_Hazards.pdf

Youtube
https://youtu.be/if4neVnr6Qw

Abstract:
Coastal areas are frequently impacted by severe storms, resulting in extreme damages to society and infrastructure. Moreover, this risk is expected to increase under rising sea levels, climate change and increased land development. In this dissertation, two main goals are defined to support coastal resilience and protection against this threat: 1) improve our ability to simulate coastal hazards in the Chesapeake Bay; and 2) explore the effectiveness of natural defenses, such as saltmarshes, in attenuating coastal hazards (storm surge and waves). Firstly, the widely used numerical system ADCIRC+SWAN was applied to explore the importance of numerical parameters, physical processes and atmospheric forcing when implementing hydrodynamic models in estuarine environments to simulate coastal hazards regionally. Secondly, numerical modeling and a 3-year field-based monitoring campaign documenting water levels, wave parameters and currents were used to evaluate the ability of coastal ecosystems to mitigate floods and attenuate waves. The analysis of measurements collected in two saltmarshes in the Chesapeake Bay during several Hurricanes, Nor'easters and other coastal storms demonstrated that 200"400m marshlands can be a viable option for coastal protection against waves, although they would be less efficient to mitigate high water depths from storm surge. Furthermore, field-based analytical formulations to predict wave height decay within the marsh were derived and validated using different events. In addition, local scale numerical model (X-Beach) simulations demonstrated that these predictive formulations can properly replicate the wave height decay within other marshes of the Chesapeake Bay. This study advances the scientific knowledge of the coastal protection capacity of saltmarshes and provides reliable numerical tools that can be used by coastal engineers to support decision makers for adopting natural and nature-based coastal defenses.

======
Please invite more people using OneNOAA Science Seminar calendar or provide E-mail address to me (Michiko.masutani@noaa.gov) . The event will appear in their google calendar.

Seminar notice will be sent to all EMC, other NCWCP occupants, NASA/GMAO, NESDIS/STAR, UMD/ESSIC, NASA/Mesoscale modeling, and other requested people. The seminar will be posted break rooms in NCWCP, the seminar web site http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html, and EMC facebook page http://bit.ly/EMC_facebook.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/

12 June 2018

Title: Integrating Novel Observation, Cultivation, and Modeling Capabilities to Unravel Harmful Algal Bloom Dynamics in Marine and Estuarine Systems
Presenter(s): Dr. Kate Hubbard, Research Scientist at Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission-Fish and Wildlife Research Institute and Guest Investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.
Date & Time: 12 June 2018
10:00 am - 11:00 am ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 10153
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Dr. Kate Hubbard, Research Scientist at Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission-Fish and Wildlife Research Institute and Guest Investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring, MD.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; hosts are Quay.Dortch@noaa.gov and Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet.Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688#
For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plug‐in for WebEx when logging on - the temporary webex application works fine.

Abstract:
Sensitive detection tools are often necessary to characterize microbial diversity. Research that integrates microscopic and genetic approaches to resolve phytoplankton diversity at ecologically relevant taxonomic scales (i.e. from individual to community) will be discussed with a focus on harmful algal bloom-forming species in the oceanic, coastal, and estuarine waters of North America. Time-series data and snapshots obtained as part of event response efforts during blooms will be discussed within the context of lab-based physiology studies to provide insight into how and which local- to global-scale processes contribute to bloom initiation, persistence, and toxicity.

Bio(s):
Dr. Kate Hubbard leads the HAB monitoring and research program at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission-Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWC-FWRI). She is also a Guest Investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution as part of the NSF/NIEHS Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health. FWC-FWRI's HAB program has strong ties to state and regional aquaculture management, and marine and estuarine research is also integral to Kate and her team's work. Current lab and field-based projects are focused on HAB and biotoxin detection, dynamics, modeling, and prediction. She received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Biological Oceanography from the University of Washington.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
Title: Moving towards an integrated community management approach in American Samoa
Presenter(s): Fa'asalafa Kitiona, Priority Watershed Coordinator, Coral Reef Advisory Group, Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources, American Samoa
Date & Time: 12 June 2018
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET