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All seminar times are given in Eastern Time

21 November 2019

Title: Gone Fishin': Trip Satisfaction in the South Carolina For-Hire Fishing Industry
Presenter(s): Stacey Weinstock,  NOAA Office of Law Enforcement 
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Stacey Weinstock, International Policy Fellow, NOAA Office of Law Enforcement  

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library.

POC:
Knauss Fellow Katie Lohr, (kathryn.lohr@noaa.gov  ) 
Remote access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Knauss Fellows Seminar Series: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7762577768086995714 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
 The charter fishing industry is an economically important recreational activity that thrives in tourist destinations in coastal areas. While there has been much research on factors contributing to trip satisfaction on freshwater angling, little has been done on marine charter and head boat anglers. To address this data gap, I utilized recent management changes on black sea bass, an economically and popular recreational species in South Carolina, to evaluate what determines trip satisfaction in the marine charter/headboat industry.  
About the speaker: Stacey Weinstock recently completed a M.S. from the Environmental Studies Program at the College of Charleston in June 2018. For her graduate thesis, she focused on social science in recreational fisheries management, but ever the multi-tasker, she simultaenously worked at South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium and The Nature Conservancy focusing on projects concerning coastal issues such as oyster management and climate change. Prior to graduate school, she gained diverse experience working in marine and wildlife conservation in the Florida Keys and Virginia. Stacey originates from Virginia and graduated from Virginia Tech in 2012 with two Bachelor of Sciences in Fisheries and Wildlife. 
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: A study on disaster insurance for fisheries
Presenter(s): Gualtiero Jaeger, Policy Fellow, NOAA HQ
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
 Gualtiero Jaeger, Policy Fellow, NOAA HQ  

Sponsor(s):
Knauss Fellows Seminar Series and NOAA Central Library.

POC:
Knauss Fellow Katie Lohr, (kathryn.lohr@noaa.gov  ) 
Remote access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, please register for the Knauss Fellows Seminar Series: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7762577768086995714 Registering for this seminar will provide you access to the full series of seminars. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic & speakers (VoIP).

Abstract:
 Hurricanes devastating fishing communities, warm water and parasites decimating salmon runs, “red tides” shutting down crab & shellfish fisheries. Since 1990 the federal government has provided $1.5 Bn in assistance for such fishery disasters, yet over the past decade, fishermen have had to wait an average of 3 years for disaster aid to arrive. Could an insurance-type solution provide speedier relief?  
About the speaker: Gualtiero Jaeger recently completed a PhD in physical oceanography in the MT-WHOI Joint Program, where he studied the ocean's response to and influence on monsoon rainfall in the Bay of Bengal. He previously worked for an acclaimed photographer in São Paulo before studying physics at the University of California Santa Barbara.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Nearshore and Vertical Distribution of Salmon off the Coast of Washington
Presenter(s): Bill Matsubu, National Research Council
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Bill Matsubu, National Research Council
JOIN VIA WEBINAR
Join Webex
Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
JOIN BY PHONE
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 213 663
ABSTRACT
The costs and challenges with sampling in the ocean have limited the research conducted on the vertical and nearshore distributions of salmon. We need a mechanistic understanding of how fish respond to environmental variables for effective management and conservation. To address these needs, we are using modified recreational fishing gear deployed at 5-m intervals from a small fishing vessel (microtrolling), which allows us to determine the latitude, longitude, and depth of capture in nearshore and offshore marine environments. Additionally, we measured temperature, light intensity, dissolved oxygen, salinity, and bottom depth. Our microtrolling data revealed that the vertical distribution of salmon is influenced by temperature and varies by species and genetic stock identification. These results will inform species distribution models and is an essential step in understanding the spatiotemporal overlap of salmon with Southern Resident Killer Whales in the ocean.
BIO
Bill Matsubu is a National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Associate stationed at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in the Fish Ecology Division. Bill received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences in 2019. Bill grew up in California and earned his B.S. in Fisheries Biology from Humboldt State University.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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Title: North Central U.S. Climate and Drought Outlook
Presenter(s): Pat Guinan, Missouri State Climatologist
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
 
Pat Guinan, Missouri State Climatologist  

Sponsor(s):
 National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, USDA Midwest Climate Hub, National Drought Mitigation Center, American Association of State Climatologists, National Weather Service
POCs: Doug Kluck (doug.kluck@noaa.gov), Britt Parker (britt.parker@noaa.gov) or Molly Woloszyn (Molly.Woloszyn@noaa.gov)

Remote Access:
 https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/north-central-us-monthly-climate-and-drought-summary-and-outlook-november-21-2019  

Abstract:
 
The focus area for this webinar is the North Central region of the U.S. (from the Rockies to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley). These free webinars provide and interpret timely information on current climate and drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. 
Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health. There will be time for questions at the end of the presentation.
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Introducing Mallows Bay-Potomac River National Marine Sanctuary
Presenter(s): Paul Orlando, Chesapeake Bay Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Date & Time: 21 November 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Paul Orlando, Chesapeake Bay Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5416072635164608524

Abstract:
The NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries announces that a new national marine sanctuary has been designated for the first time in nearly 20 years. We introduce to you Mallows Bay-Potomac River National Marine Sanctuary in Maryland. Mallows Bay is most renowned for its "Ghost Fleet," the partially submerged remains of more than 100 wooden steamships that were built in response to threats from World War I-era German U-boats that were sinking ships in the Atlantic. Although the ships never saw action during the war, their construction at more than 40 shipyards in 17 states reflected the massive national wartime effort that drove the expansion and economic development of communities and related maritime service industries.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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22 November 2019

Title:
New
November 2019 National Weather Service Alaska Climate Outlook Briefing
Presenter(s): Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy - ACCAP, a NOAA RISA Team
Date & Time: 22 November 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Rick Thoman, Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) 

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) - A NOAA RISA Team and National Weather Service

POC:
Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) and Richard Thoman (rthoman@alaska.edu)

Remote Access:
 http://accap.adobeconnect.com/november2019/event/registration.html

Abstract:
The tools and techniques for making monthly and season scale climate forecasts are rapidly changing, with the potential to provide useful forecasts at the month and longer range. We will review recent climate conditions around Alaska, review some forecast tools and finish up the Climate Prediction Center's forecast for December and the winter season. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the gathering in person or online to learn more about Alaska climate and weather.
Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)
Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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25 November 2019

Title: Preparing Your Winter Toolbox: Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar for California-Nevada
Presenter(s): Dan McEvoy, CNAP/WRCC/DRI,Julie Kalansky, CNAP/SIO
Date & Time: 25 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
 
Drought & Climate Update: Dan McEvoy, PhD, California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute   
Drought & Climate Outlook: Julie Kalansky, PhD, California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Scripps Institution of Oceanography    

Sponsor(s):
 National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), California Nevada Climate Applications Program (CNAP), Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Scripps Institution of Oceanography  

POC:
 Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov

Remote Access:
 https://www.drought.gov/drought/calendar/events/california-nevada-drought-climate-outlook-webinar-november-25-2019  

Abstract:
 
Fall in California and Nevada can bring dry weather, but this year has been especially so, with many areas receiving hardly any or no precipitation the last couple months. Is this dryness a trend that will continue into winter, or just typical fall weather? When will the wildfire risk die down? Will the Pacific Blob (marine heatwave) influence the weather? This webinar will provide an overview of the current conditions and outlook for the rest of a fall into winter as well as tools you can use to prepare for, monitor, and respond to the climate conditions this winter.
The California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System (CA-NV DEWS) November 2019 Drought & Climate Outlook Webinar is part of a series of regular drought and climate outlook webinars designed to provide stakeholders and other interested parties in the region with timely information on current drought status and impacts, as well as a preview of current and developing climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña). 
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmADP4Cm4SNtYZMmrY48PtQ)
Seminar POC for questions: Amanda Sheffield, NOAA/NIDIS, amanda.sheffield@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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27 November 2019

Title: Onramps and offramps: Three proposed uses for spatio-temporal models in connecting ecosystem surveys to fisheries management
Presenter(s): Jim Thorson, PhD Quantitative Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 27 November 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL Oceanographer Room (Building 3 Room #2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Jim Thorson, PhD Quantitative Ecologist, NOAA Fisheries
Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. 
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101 
You can also dial in using your phone. 
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311 
Access Code: 891-851-101 

Abstract:
three examples using spatio-temporal models to investigate processes driving shifts in spatial distribution, secondary production, and recruitment in the eastern Bering Sea.
Seminar

POC:
heather.tabisola@noaa.gov & jens.nielsen@noaa.gov 
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Tundra be dammed: Beaver colonization of the Arctic
Presenter(s): Ken Tape, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date & Time: 27 November 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Ken Tape, University of Alaska Fairbanks 

Sponsor(s):
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP), A NOAA RISA Team

POC:
Tina Buxbaum (tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu, 907-474-7812) 

Remote Access:
 https://uaf-accap.org/event/tundra-be-dammed-beaver-colonization-of-the-arctic/

Abstract:
 
Using time series of satellite images, we have observed hundreds of new beaver ponds in tundra regions of western and northern Alaska. This talk will describe beaver movement into arctic tundra regions and some predicted implications for tundra ecosystems.
Available in-person at: Room 407 in the Akasofu Building on the UAF Campus in Fairbanks
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find them here (https://uaf-accap.org/events/about-accap-webinars/)
Seminar POC for questions: tmbuxbaum@alaska.edu or sean.bath@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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3 December 2019

Title: Implications of changes in the optical environment for groundfish stock assessment in the eastern Bering Sea
Presenter(s): Sean Rohan, University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences
Date & Time: 3 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2076 (Traynor Room)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Sean Rohan, University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series
Webinar Access: 
https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m4073b7663f5117c23320220f7e887800
Meeting number:  901 339 963
Meeting password:  grdfish-123
When it's time, join the meeting.
For Audio, please call: 1-888-456-5038 and enter participant passcode: 8480290 followed by #.
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract:
 Changes in the optical environment can affect the productivity andcatchability of fish stocks. However, the optical environment is rarelymonitored in habitat used by deep-dwelling fishes in coastal marine ecosystems.In this talk, I will describe a novel method of obtaining apparent opticalproperties from light data collected during NOAA's annual summer bottom-trawl surveys of the easternBering Sea. The apparent optical properties, optical depth and the vertical attenuation coefficient, characterize relative darkness andwater clarity. Using a virtualspecies simulation, I will then evaluate whether changes in the opticalenvironment of the eastern Bering Sea during 2004"2018 could affect thereliability of bottom-trawl survey density estimates of demersal stocks due to vision-dependent changes in catchability.
Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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4 December 2019

Title: eSDM: Creating ensembles of predictions from species distribution models
Presenter(s): Samuel Woodman, NOAA/NMFS/SWFSC Marine Mammal and Turtle Division, contracted by Ocean Associates, Inc.
Date & Time: 4 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Via webinar (see below) or for NOAA Silver Spring folks, SSMC4 Room 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: 
eSDM: Creating ensembles of predictions from species distribution models    

Presenter(s):
 
Samuel Woodman, NOAA/NMFS/SWFSC Marine Mammal and Turtle Division, contracted by Ocean Associates, Inc.    

Sponsor(s):
 
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access: 
Please register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/esdm/event/registration.html
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
 
Species distribution modeling (SDM) in dynamic marine environments has enhanced our ecological understanding and ability to assess potential impacts to species of conservation concern at finer spatial scales than traditional methods. However,different data sets or analytical approaches often yield different modeled results, creating uncertainty and challenges in the decision-making process.For example, there are currently multiple SDMs for blue whales off the U.S.West Coast, and assessing spatial distribution shifts using these models is challenging because they predict absolute density, relative density, or probability of occurrence at varying spatial resolutions. One solution is‘ensemble averaging', where the outputs of multiple models are combined using a weighted or unweighted average. Such ensemble models are often more robust than individual models. We present eSDM, an R package with a built-in graphical user interface, and as well as an example analysis using eSDM to create an ensemble of the three blue whale models. eSDM allows users to create ensembles of SDM predictions made at different spatial scales, using different data sources, and with different numerical scales to better evaluate spatial uncertainties and make informed conservation and management decisions.

Bio:
 
Sam Woodman is a contractor working with the NOAA/NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center's (SWFSC) Marine Mammal and Turtle Division. Since graduating from Harvey Mudd College with a degree in Mathematical and Computational Biology, he has worked on a variety of projects at the SWFSC. These projects have consisted of fieldwork monitoring pinnipeds and seabirds in the Antarctic, as well as developing R code and packages for assessing the risk of cetaceans becoming entangled in fishing gear.Sam hopes to continue to be able to use both his fieldwork and computational experience to collect data and develop tools to help inform management efforts.   
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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Title: Major sources of urban methane emissions along the east coast: A case study for using commercial aircraft to monitor greenhouse gases
Presenter(s): Colm Sweeney, Global Monitoring Division, OAR
Date & Time: 4 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD and via webinar https://goo.gl/mHLuVv, OAR - Library - GoToMeeting Account
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Colm Sweeney, Global Monitoring Division, Lead Scientist Carbon Cycle Aircraft Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Central Library (

POC:
Outreach Librarian Erin Cheever, erin.cheever@noaa.gov)
Remote? Join us via webinar https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5847816766505025026 

Abstract:
The East Coast Outflow (ECO) experiment is an ongoing intensive airborne campaign whose first phase ran from April 10 through May 15, 2018 measuring the outflow of CO2, CH4, C2H6, O3 and CO from 5 major cities along the NE corridor of the US (Baltimore, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Providence and Washington, D.C.). Significant correlations exist between these measurements, in particular, CO, CO2, CH4 and C2H6 show very significant correlations with one another, indicating a large fraction of the CH4 emissions are co-located with CO and CO2 emissions at the urban-scale. Methane and ethane relationships also suggest that a majority of these CH4 emissions originate from leakage of natural gas from distribution network of these cities. Using CO2 as a tracer and a variety of CO2 inventories we estimate magnitude of these emissions and the likelihood that leakage of fossil CH4 from the urban distribution network is a large source of CH4 which is largely ignored by recent updates in bottom up methane inventories. Technology now exists to be able to deploy some of the same instrumentation used during ECO on commercial aircraft providing daily measurements of urban centers throughout the world. As demonstrated by the first ECO campaign, these measurements can provide critical feedback to policy and bottom up analysis of urban emissions for greenhouse gases and other trace gases affecting air quality and public health.
About the speaker: Colm Sweeney leads the aircraft program for the NOAA Global Monitoring Division Carbon Cycle Group. Colm has lead or co-authored more than 170 peer-reviewed articles spanning a wide range of topics including air-sea gas and greenhouse gas emissions in the Arctic, urban and oil and gas regions as well as new technologies for sampling the atmosphere and ocean. Colm is currently serving as Acting Deputy Director of the Ocean Observing and Monitoring Division at NOAA.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscience seminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Trophic cascades, climate change, and the fate of a kelp forest ecosystem
Presenter(s): Douglas Rasher, PhD Marine Community Ecologist, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science, East Boothbay, ME
Date & Time: 4 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL Oceanographer Room (Building 3 Room #2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Speaker: Douglas Rasher, PhD Marine Community Ecologist, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science
Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. 
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101 
You can also dial in using your phone. 
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311 
Access Code: 891-851-101 

Abstract:
In this talk, Dr. Rasher will discuss how the emergent effects of climate change and megafaunal loss are reshaping an iconic kelp forest ecosystem.
Seminar

POC:
 heather.tabisola@noaa.gov & jens.nielsen@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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Title: Working with species occurrence data from citizen science: lessons from a review of analysis approaches
Presenter(s): Caitlin Mandeville, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Date & Time: 4 December 2019
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Sponsors: NOAA Fisheries and the NOAA Central Library;

POC:
Laura Oremland (laura.oremland@noaa.gov)
Webinar: Register for the presentation https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/605934663590442753

Presenter(s):
Caitlin Mandeville, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, PhD student

Abstract:
Citizen science programs that ask volunteers to report species observations to online databases have become popular, resulting in an enormous amount of openly available biodiversity data. But analyzing these data can be challenging, due to the lack of structured sampling design. We used a systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature to describe trends in the analysis of citizen science species occurrence data, with lessons for researchers seeking to use citizen science data as well as managers of programs that collect biodiversity data from volunteers.
About the Speaker: Caitlin Mandeville is currently conducting her PhD research on analysis approaches and conservation applications of citizen science species observation data at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. She is part of an interdisciplinary research team approaching this topic from many angles, including data quality, modeling methods, social science, and more. Originally from the US, she completed her MS degree at the University of Wyoming and worked in citizen science for New Hampshire Sea Grant before beginning her PhD research.
Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to 
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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5 December 2019

Title: National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) 101: What I Wish I'd Known When I Worked at Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) (Originally scheduled for Oct 30 and Nov 13))
Presenter(s): Jim Yoe, NWS/NCEP
Date & Time: 5 December 2019
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

The seminar was originally scheduled on October 30, 2019 and November 13, 2019.  We apologize for any inconvenience.
OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter:
 Jim Yoe, NWS/NCEP

Sponsor(s):
STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:        900 946 681   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
    https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m73bfc45938367d9230387b008e1bf98c

Audio:
       +1-415-527-5035 US Toll
    Access code:   900 946 681

Abstract:
 TBD

Bio:
  James G. (Jim) Yoe serves in the Office of the Director of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction as NCEP's Research Transition Manager.  In this capacity he coordinates NCEP's activities for the Science and Technology Integration portfolio and the Observations portfolio, and he serves as the Chief Administrative Officer of the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCDSA.)  Prior to joining NCEP, he spent 14 years  with the National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service,  as a member of the NPOESS Data Exploitation Project, after working in STAR and serving as Deputy Director of the JCSDA, and developing applications for space-based remote sensors including Doppler Wind lidar and GPS Radio Occultation.  He earned BS and PhD degrees in physics from the University of the South and Clemson University, respectively, and conducted post-doctoral research investigating winds, waves, and turbulence using MST Doppler radar and UV lidar at the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy in Germany.  His hobbies include gardening, playing the guitar, and archery. Dogs love him.

POC:
 Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.  
 
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Title: Central Valley Chinook Salmon Smolt Outmigration Mortality in Freshwater and Estuarine Habitats
Presenter(s): Mark Henderson, US Geological Survey
Date & Time: 5 December 2019
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm ET
Location: Northwest Fisheries Science Center Auditorium 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Sponsor(s):
  NWFSC Monster Seminar JAM series. For additional information please contact Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov

Presenter(s):
Mark Henderson, US Geological Survey
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Meeting number: 908 213 663
Meeting password: 5A5Ptfax
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+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 213 663

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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Title: Leveraging NERRS System-Wide Monitoring Program Data for Wetland Research and Management
Presenter(s): Kim Cressman, Grand Bay NERR, David Burdick, University of New Hampshire, Dwayne Porter, NERRS Centralized Data Management Office, Chris Kinkade, NOAA Office for Coastal Management
Date & Time: 5 December 2019
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm ET
Location: Webinar Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminars
Title: Leveraging NERRS System-Wide Monitoring Program Data for Wetland Research and Management

Presenter(s):
Kim Cressman, Grand Bay NERR; David Burdick, University of New Hampshire; Dwayne Porter, NERRS Centralized Data Management Office; Chris Kinkade, NOAA Office for Coastal Management

Sponsor(s):
NERRS Science Collaborative (https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/science-collaborative.html or http://www.nerrssciencecollaborative.org/). 
Webinar: Please register through GoToWebinar (https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6625009859224215042).
Seminar POC for questions: dwight.trueblood@noaa.gov or nsoberal@umich.edu

Abstract:
 Long-term monitoring data can be a tremendousasset for coastal research and management, but processing and analyzing thedata and extracting key findings can be challenging. 

The National Estuarine Research ReserveSystem's System-wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) has been collecting physical and biological data at estuaries across the country for many years. This webinarwill feature two projects that have been analyzing these monitoring data frommultiple sites to understand better trends in marsh surface elevation andvegetation in relation to sea levels. Project leads will share a few examplesof their findings that can inform marsh resilience efforts, and provide tipsfor others considering SWMP synthesis projects. 

The webinar will wrap up with a discussion ofopportunities and strategies for using SWMP data for future research andmanagement applications.


About the

Presenter(s):
KimCressman from Grand Bay NERR will provide an overview of her catalyst project: Is MarshSurface Tracking Sea Level Change? Developing Tools and Visualizations forSentinel Site Data. This project is developingdata analysis and visualization tools for a relatively new element within thereserve monitoring program - Surface Elevation Table (SET) data. SETmeasurements enable reserves to track changes in marsh surface height overtime. The data are critical for monitoring marsh resilience in the face ofrising seas, but SET data require specialized protocols for processing, qualitychecking and analyzing the data in a consistent way across sites. 

DavidBurdick from the University of New Hampshire and Chris Peters from Great BayNERR will provide an overview of their project: SynthesizingMonitoring Data to Improve Coastal Wetland Management Across New England. This project is analyzing Sentinel Site data from fourNew England reserves, which have individually been monitoring salt marshvegetation and elevation changes since at least 2011. The team is developingdata packages linking vegetation change with surface elevation and other data,including output from an inundation tool. In addition to providing an initialsummary of patterns, the project is developing analysis protocols that can beutilized by other reserves and coastal managers nationwide.

The webinar will also include comments and discussion from ChrisKinkade andDwayne Porter.

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weeklyemail: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminarsrequest@list.woc.noaa.gov with the work 'subscribe'in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA ScienceSeminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/   

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Title: Sinkholes to Stars: Exploring Microbial Ecosystems in Lake Huron’s Sinkholes
Presenter(s): Bopi Biddanda, Annis Water Resources Institute at Grand Valley State University
Date & Time: 5 December 2019
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Bopi Biddanda, Annis Water Resources Institute at Grand Valley State University

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5603720784819152141

Abstract:
Join Professor Bopi Biddanda as he shares the excitement of over a decade of exploration of life in Lake Huron's sinkholes carried out in collaboration with NOAA's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. He will ponder the relevance of these findings to major issues of both scientific and societal interest such as Earth's current biologic and physiologic diversity, oxygenation of early Earth in the distant past, and humanity's ongoing search for extraterrestrial life. For an introduction to life in Lake Huron's sinkholes, see this overview educational article: http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/rock-water-microbes-underwater-sinkholes-in-lake-25851285
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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10 December 2019

Title: Diverse applications of spatiotemporal analyses for monitoring demersal communities in the eastern North Pacific
Presenter(s): Lewis Barnett, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program
Date & Time: 10 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: AFSC - Seattle - LgConf Rm - 2076 (Traynor Room)
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Lewis Barnett, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Groundfish Assessment Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center Groundfish Seminar Series
Webinar Access: 
https://noaanmfs-meets.webex.com/noaanmfs-meets/j.php?MTID=m4073b7663f5117c23320220f7e887800
Meeting number:  901 339 963
Meeting password:  grdfish-123
When it's time, join the meeting.
For Audio, please call: 1-888-456-5038 and enter participant passcode: 8480290 followed by #.
Please contact Liz.Dawson@noaa.gov and/or Mark.Zimmermann@noaa.gov with any questions!

Abstract:
TBD
Subscribe to the weekly OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to
OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body.
See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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11 December 2019

Title:
New
Moved to 12/18: Climate Change Vulnerability of Lobster Fishing Communities in Atlantic Canada
Presenter(s): Blair Greenan and Nancy Shackell, both Research Scientists with Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Date & Time: 11 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Rescheduled from 11/14/19 to 12/18 (not as shown here, on 12/11)
Title: 
Climate Change Vulnerability of Lobster Fishing Communities in Atlantic Canada

Presenter(s):
 
Blair Greenan, Research Scientist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Nancy Shackell, Research Scientist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Sponsor(s):
 
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access: 
Please register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/lobster/event/registration.html 
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
 
Climate change impacts on fisheries will undoubtedly have socio-economic impacts on coastal communities and the seafood market. However, it is a challenge to integrate climate change information in a form that can be used efficiently by adaptation planners, policy makers and fishery managers. In this study, we frame a climate change impact assessment using a geographical perspective based on the management units of the dominant fishery, in this case, American lobster in Nova Scotia, Canada. The information considered here includes economic dependence on the fishery, population size, diversity of the fishery revenue, status of harbour infrastructure, total replacement cost of each harbour, increased relative sea level and flooding, and the vulnerability of offshore lobster to ocean warming and changes in zooplankton composition and anticipatory changes in fishery productivity across management borders. Using two ocean models to provide multi-decadal scale projections of bottom temperature, changes in offshore lobster distribution are projected to have a neutral, or positive impact on the region as a whole. However, when lobster vulnerability is combined with climate change related vulnerabilities of coastal fishing communities, it is evident that adaptation planning is needed for long-term sustainability. This impact assessment provides both a framework and information for further in-depth analyses by climate change adaptation planners and fishery managers.
About the

Presenter(s):
 
Drs. Blair Greenan and Nancy Shackell are research scientists at Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Nova Scotia, Canada. In 2012, Nancy and Blair co-managed a large research group to assess the vulnerabilities, opportunities and impacts of climate change throughout the Atlantic Basin. Recently, their research has focused on developing climate change adaptation tools to provide science advice to DFO on issues related to coastal infrastructure and fisheries management.
 
Blair manages a diverse group of researchers that focus on ocean stressors ranging from marine oil spills to climate change effects such as ocean acidification. He is the Scientific Director for the Argo Canada program which contributes to the International Argo program in advancing global real-time observations of the ocean with autonomous instruments. Blair received his Ph.D. from the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto.
 
Nancy's research focuses on fisheries ecology in support of Ecosystem Approach to Management. Nancy has published on biodiversity, important habitat of commercial species, marine protected areas, trophic balance, integrated ecological assessments, impacts of climate change, Atlantic halibut spatial ecology, and climate change adaptation. Nancy received a B.Sc. in Biology from McGill University, Montreal and a Ph.D. in Biology from Dalhousie University, Halifax.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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Title: Bottoms Up: King County Phytoplankton and Zooplankton Monitoring in the Puget Sound
Presenter(s): Kimberle Stark Senior Water Quality Planner, King County, Seattle, WA
Date & Time: 11 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL Oceanographer Room (Building 3 Room #2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Speaker: Kimberle Stark Senior Water Quality Planner, King County, Seattle, WA
Seminar sponsor: This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101 

Abstract:
King County methods for monitoring phytoplankton and zooplankton in the Puget Sound, changes we've observedt, and factors that influence dynamics will be presented.
Seminar

POC:
 heather.tabisola@noaa.gov & jens.nielsen@noaa.gov
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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12 December 2019

Title: Putting the Best “Foot” Forward: Ending the Era of the U.S. Survey Foot
Presenter(s): Dr. Michael Dennis, National Geodetic Survey
Date & Time: 12 December 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET
Location: Webinar Access
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: Putting the Best “Foot” Forward: Ending the Era of the U.S. Survey Foot

Presenter(s):
Dr. Michael Dennis,  National Geodetic Survey 

Sponsor(s):
NOAA's National Geodetic Survey.

POC:
Steve Vogel, National Geodetic Survey
Webinar Access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4683314105040172290

Abstract:
An era will soon end. In 1959, the name “U.S. survey foot” was given to an existing definition so that its use could temporarily continue alongside the new “international foot.” After December 31, 2022, only the international foot definition will be used in the United States: 1 foot = 0.3048 meter exactly (but simply called the “foot”). That will stop the simultaneous use of two nearly identical foot versions that differ by only 0.01 foot per mile.
NGS and the National Institute of Standards and Technology have collaborated to resolve the problem of two feet, as described in this webinar by:
  • Giving an overview of the history
  • Providing examples of problems encountered
  • Summarizing public comments received
  • Charting a path forward as part of modernizing the National Spatial Reference System
The intent is to provide national uniformity of length measurement in an orderly fashion with minimum disruption. It will end a dilemma that has persisted for over 60 years.
Intermediate Technical Content Rating: Some prior knowledge is helpful.
Visit the NGS Webinar Series website to register, sign up to receive monthly webinar notices, and learn more: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/web/science_edu/webinar_series/.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information (https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/).
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13 December 2019

Title:
New
NOAA: A 50-Year, Personal Perspective
Presenter(s): Dr. Jawed Hameedi, Lead Physical Scientist, NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Date & Time: 13 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: TBD
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Title: NOAA: A 50-Year, Personal Perspective

Presenter(s):
Dr. Jawed Hameedi, Lead Physical Scientist, NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)
Presenting at NOAA in Silver Spring

Sponsor(s):

NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access:
Please register at: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/noaa50years/event/registration.html
After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar.
Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headset.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:

Some pioneering research at the University of Washington coincided with the stated intent of creating the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 1970, which included a realization that the oceans and the atmosphere are interacting parts of the global environment upon which we depend for the quality of our lives.Further, there was an immediate and compelling need for better knowledge of the total environment to more effectively monitor and predict its actions, and ultimately to exercise some degree of control over it. Since its inception andusing new observational technologies, computer-based analyses and models, and greater insight into interconnections and complexity in the environment, NOAA has continually advanced science-based management of natural resources. The Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program and the Marine Ecosystems Analysis Program are two early examples of such endeavors that firmly established NOAA's expertise in conceptualizing and implementing multi-year,multi-disciplinary research programs, whose success could be measured by the quality of information and tools, and benefits to the American public. In the Arctic, NOAA also played a key role in implementing the international Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy and provided scientific leadership in realizing its goals. The relationship between water quality and NOAA has remained both authentic and contradictory; it is indeed paradoxical. For more than two decades, NOAA was engaged in studies to assess impacts of sewage disposal at sea, developing measures of “unreasonable degradation” of the marine environment, and determining economic, environmental and public health costs of different waste disposal alternatives. Ocean dumping of sewage sludge ceased in 1988. On the other hand, NOAA was not successful in implementing the National Coastal Monitoring Act or its part of the National Water Quality Monitoring Network, which included linkage with the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System. Successful future endeavors on coastal water quality would require not only within-NOAA collaboration but also more effective interagency partnerships for more parsimonious and effective approaches.

Bio:

TBD
.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email:
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information.
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18 December 2019

Title:
New
Climate Change Vulnerability of Lobster Fishing Communities in Atlantic Canada
Presenter(s): Blair Greenan and Nancy Shackell, both Research Scientists with Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Date & Time: 18 December 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: SSMC4 - Large Conference Room - 8150
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Rescheduled from 11/14/19, due to technical problems.
Title: 
Climate Change Vulnerability of Lobster Fishing Communities in Atlantic Canada

Presenter(s):
 
Blair Greenan, Research Scientist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Nancy Shackell, Research Scientist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Sponsor(s):
 
NOAA's National Ocean Service Science Seminar; coordinator is Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov
Webinar Access: 
Please register at https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/canada/event/registration.html 
After registering, an email will arrive with the webinar address.
Users should use either IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Audio will be available thru the computer only; no phone. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. This Webcast will be recorded, archived and made accessible in the near future. You can test your ability to use Adobe Connect at the following link: https://noaabroadcast.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
Audio is over the computer, so adjust volume on your computer speakers or headsets.
Questions? Email Tracy.Gill@noaa.gov

Abstract:
 
Climate change impacts on fisheries will undoubtedly have socio-economic impacts on coastal communities and the seafood market. However, it is a challenge to integrate climate change information in a form that can be used efficiently by adaptation planners, policy makers and fishery managers. In this study, we frame a climate change impact assessment using a geographical perspective based on the management units of the dominant fishery, in this case, American lobster in Nova Scotia, Canada. The information considered here includes economic dependence on the fishery, population size, diversity of the fishery revenue, status of harbour infrastructure, total replacement cost of each harbour, increased relative sea level and flooding, and the vulnerability of offshore lobster to ocean warming and changes in zooplankton composition and anticipatory changes in fishery productivity across management borders. Using two ocean models to provide multi-decadal scale projections of bottom temperature, changes in offshore lobster distribution are projected to have a neutral, or positive impact on the region as a whole. However, when lobster vulnerability is combined with climate change related vulnerabilities of coastal fishing communities, it is evident that adaptation planning is needed for long-term sustainability. This impact assessment provides both a framework and information for further in-depth analyses by climate change adaptation planners and fishery managers.
About the

Presenter(s):
 
Drs. Blair Greenan and Nancy Shackell are research scientists at Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Nova Scotia, Canada. In 2012, Nancy and Blair co-managed a large research group to assess the vulnerabilities, opportunities and impacts of climate change throughout the Atlantic Basin. Recently, their research has focused on developing climate change adaptation tools to provide science advice to DFO on issues related to coastal infrastructure and fisheries management.
 
Blair manages a diverse group of researchers that focus on ocean stressors ranging from marine oil spills to climate change effects such as ocean acidification. He is the Scientific Director for the Argo Canada program which contributes to the International Argo program in advancing global real-time observations of the ocean with autonomous instruments. Blair received his Ph.D. from the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto.
 
Nancy's research focuses on fisheries ecology in support of Ecosystem Approach to Management. Nancy has published on biodiversity, important habitat of commercial species, marine protected areas, trophic balance, integrated ecological assessments, impacts of climate change, Atlantic halibut spatial ecology, and climate change adaptation. Nancy received a B.Sc. in Biology from McGill University, Montreal and a Ph.D. in Biology from Dalhousie University, Halifax.
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: 
Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. 
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Title: Into the Great Wide Open: Colonization of Novel Habitat by Atlantic Salmon
Presenter(s): Danielle M. Frechette, PhD Marine Resource Scientist, Maine Department of Marine Resources, Augusta, ME
Date & Time: 18 December 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: PMEL Oceanographer Room (Building 3 Room #2104), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98103 or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Speaker: Danielle M. Frechette, PhD Marine Resource Scientist, Maine Department of Marine Resources
Seminar sponsor:  This seminar is part of NOAA's EcoFOCI bi-annual seminar series focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and U.S. Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, http://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/.

Remote Access:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/891851101
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311
Access Code: 891-851-101 

Abstract:
This talk will provide a bird's eye view of a colonization program implemented for Atlantic salmon population enhancement in a Quebec river.
Seminar

POC:
 heather.tabisola@noaa.gov & jens.nielsen@noaa.gov 
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. See http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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14 January 2020

Title: Home Away from Home: The beneficial role of artificial structures for climate-displaced species
Presenter(s): Zachary J, Cannizzo, Ph.D., National Marine Protected Areas Center and NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Fellow through the Sea Grant John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program
Date & Time: 14 January 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Zachary J. Cannizzo, Ph.D., National Marine Protected Areas Center and NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Fellow through the Sea Grant John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5385014730255927308

Abstract:
Artificial structures such as buildings, telephone poles, and boat docks are ubiquitous in the modern environment and are often thought of as having negative impacts on wildlife. However, the role that artificial structures can play in mitigating the impacts of stressors, including climate change, on affected species is increasingly being recognized. In addition to a discussion of this topic, Dr. Cannizzo will highlight a case study which examines the role of boat docks in facilitating the climate-mediated range expansion of a crab into a sub-optimal novel ecosystem.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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26 March 2020

Title: Ocean Guardian Schools: Learn how to get involved
Presenter(s): Naomi Pollack, Ocean Guardian School Program Coordinator
Date & Time: 26 March 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Presenter(s):
Naomi Pollack, Ocean Guardian School Program Coordinator

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1035761246304441357

Abstract:
What do 134 schools with over 61,000 students from around the country have in common? They have all made a commitment to protect the health of their local watersheds, one ocean and special ocean areas like national marine sanctuaries. ​Since 2009, NOAA's Ocean Guardian School program (https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/ocean_guardian/) has supported K-12 schools to conduct hands-on watershed/ocean stewardship projects on campuses and in local communities. Please join Naomi Pollack for a program overview and learn how your school can participate and become recognized by NOAA as an Ocean Guardian School.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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23 April 2020

Title: Gardening Corals for Reef Restoration
Presenter(s): Katie Lohr, Conservation Science Fellow for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries through the Sea Grant John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program
Date & Time: 23 April 2020
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm ET
Location: Remote Access Only
Description:


OneNOAA Science Seminar Series
Gardening Corals for Reef Restoration

Presenter(s):
Katie Lohr, Conservation Science Fellow for the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries through the Sea Grant John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship Program

Sponsor(s):
NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
Seminar POC for questions: Claire.Fackler@noaa.gov, (805) 893-6429
Remote access: Register for webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4679716503903139852

Abstract:
As coral reefs decline globally, interest in using coral gardening techniques for reef restoration is increasing. This webinar presentation will review well-established and cutting-edge techniques for propagating and restoring corals, as well as experimental work focused on identifying corals that can survive future ocean conditions.
More information on the National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series:
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series.html
Are our seminars recorded? Yes, you can find our webinar archives, copies of the presentation slides, and other educational resources at: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html
Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series website for more information. https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/
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