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STAR Seminars

This page lists upcoming STAR Science Forum seminars. Presentation materials for seminars will be posted with each scheduled talk when available.

Arranging a new seminar?

To submit a new seminar for the series, fill this form: STAR Seminar Form.

 

All seminar times are given in Eastern Time


29 August 2019

Title: The NOAA PolarWatch Program
Presenter(s): Jennifer Sevadjian, NOAA/NMFS
Date & Time: 29 August 2019
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Med Conf Rm - 3555
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Jennifer Sevadjian of NOAA/NMFS (presenting remotely)

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx (for screen sharing only, see below for Audio):
Event Number:    907 468 427   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m4a800d05f758829bbb095df8f8c13c93

Audio:
  
    +1-415-527-5035 US Toll
    Access code: 907 468 427

Abstract:
NOAA PolarWatch is the newest satellite data distribution portal of NOAA's CoastWatch program. The portal offers a single location for federal agencies, research groups, and private industry to obtain the most recent and historical satellite observations of Arctic and Antarctic waters, including measurements of sea ice cover, ocean temperature, and winds. We will provide an overview of the data and services provided by PolarWatch with examples that demonstrate supporting safety at sea, navigation, fishing, transportation, tourism, and recreation. We will also highlight user training materials and training courses that are designed to encourage broad usage of polar satellite data.

Bio:
Jennifer Sevadjian is the Operations Manager for PolarWatch a regional node of NOAA's CoastWatch. She has a background in ocean data management, data integration and web development. She began her career at NOAA CO-OPS Ocean System Test and Evaluation Program, in 2002, collecting in-situ data and performing data analysis, and has gone on to work in many different sectors including the military, academia, private industry and non-profit communities. She joined NOAA PolarWatch in 2017, after serving as the information manager for CeNCOOS (a U.S. IOOS regional association). She is particularly passionate about data discovery, data integration and increasing the use of ocean data and is currently enjoying building solutions to address the challenges associated with polar ocean data.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

5 September 2019

Title: Stop Making Ugly Posters!
Presenter(s): Lori Brown, STAR
Date & Time: 5 September 2019
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2554-2555
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Lori Brown, STAR

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    903 366 617   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m8a69bc3666f8d0329396221a59a6ca0d

Audio:
  
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 903 366 617

Abstract:
Science posters are a fundamental unit for disseminating and communicating our work in the sciences. For most researchers, however, drafting and producing posters is crammed into the last minute before important meetings and conferences, and few are educated about the basics of layout, color, type selection, and design. In this talk I'll introduce concepts, techniques, and tools to help you design and produce better posters and presentations. You don't have to be an artist to create an attractive, effective, easy to read poster that draws visitors to learn about your work.

Bio:
Lori Brown has been a graphic designer and web developer for over 20 years, and STAR webmaster since 2006. Ms. Brown has a strong understanding of workflow and form design, usability principles, information design, and accessibility standards. Lori is the UI designer / developer for the STAR GOES Imagery site, which, since its launch in December 2017, has averaged about 10 million image downloads and 100,000 page views per day.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

11 September 2019

Title: Advances in Satellite and Airborne Altimetry over Arctic Sea Ice – Towards Improved Prediction
Presenter(s): Sinéad L. Farrell, University of Maryland
Date & Time: 11 September 2019
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Sinéad L. Farrell, University of Maryland

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    908 239 193   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=mcad69cb0154465709bf94f1477ddff56

Audio:
  
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 239 193

Abstract:
One of the most striking, and widely publicized, environmental changes underway in the Earth system is the disappearance of the Arctic sea ice cover.  Since sea ice is a key component of the climate system, its ongoing loss has serious, and wide-ranging, socio-economic implications. Increasing year-to-year variability in the geographic location, concentration and thickness of Arctic ice will pose both challenges and opportunities. Advancing our understanding of how the sea ice cover varies, and why, is key to characterizing the physical processes governing change, and for advancing model predictions. An emerging need is short-time-critical sea ice data products to support safety and security for maritime operations in ice-infested waters.
Altimeter instruments on satellite and aircraft platforms have revolutionized our understanding of Arctic sea ice mass balance over the last two decades. Satellite laser and radar altimeters on NASA's ICESat and ICESat-2 satellites, and ESA's CryoSat-2, provide unique measurements of sea ice elevation, from which ice thickness may be derived, across basin scales. Meanwhile altimeters deployed on aircraft such as the Operation IceBridge Mission, together with coincident digital imagery, provide a range of novel, high-resolution observations that describe key features of the ice cover including its snow cover, surface morphology and deformation characteristics, and summer melt features. We will explore the novel sea ice data products developed at the NOAA Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry that describe changes in the Arctic ice cover during the last two decades. We will also discuss efforts to advance access to polar ocean remote sensing observations and improve communication with Arctic stakeholders through the NOAA PolarWatch initiative, which is designed to deliver data products that best address societal needs (polarwatch.noaa.gov).

Bio:
Sinéad Louise Farrell is an associate professor with the Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland, and a visiting scientist at the NOAA / NESDIS / STAR / SOCD Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry, College Park, Maryland. Dr. Farrell received her Ph.D. in Space and Climate Physics from University College London in 2007. Her primary fields of study are cryospheric sciences and remote sensing. She is a principal investigator on the NASA ICESat-2 Science Team and a member of the Mission Advisory Group for the EU Copernicus Polar Ice and Snow Topography Altimeter. Prior to joining the Department of Geographical Sciences, Dr. Farrell was with the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), at the University of Maryland.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

12 September 2019

Title: Fellowship of the Rain (Gauge Network)
Presenter(s): Douglas Miller, UNC Asheville
Date & Time: 12 September 2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Douglas Miller, UNC Asheville, and Ana Barros, Duke University

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    908 336 124   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m721f19bb9ddcea0b85d23703d0d9672d

Audio:
  
+1-415-527-5035 US Toll
Access code: 908 336 124

Abstract:
A high elevation rain gauge network, known as the Duke Great Smoky Mountains
Rain Gauge Network (Duke GSMRGN), has been collecting rainfall observations
since 2007 in the Pigeon River Basin located in the Southern Appalachian
Mountains. The presentation will focus on the founding, funding, findings, and
future of the Duke GSMRGN and their associated fellowships. The findings
portion will examine the influence of atmospheric rivers on extreme rainfall events
observed by the Duke GSMRGN over an eight period commencing 1 July 2009.

Bio:

Douglas Miller is a professor at the University of North Carolina, Asheville.  He received his Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from Purdue University. His research expertise is in mesoscale and synoptic meteorology, mountain meteorology, coastal meteorology, boundary layer meteorology, and numerical weather prediction/forecasting.  He has been involved with a collaborative project extending the Great Smoky Mountain rain gauge mesonet and exploring the origins of extreme precipitation events in the southern Appalachian Mountains and their signatures as observed by the GOES-R satellite.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

18 September 2019

Title: Assimilation of Satellite Microwave Observations in the Rainband of Hurricanes using a Novel Bayesian Monte Carlo Technique
Presenter(s): Isaac Moradi, NASA
Date & Time: 18 September 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
Location: Conference Room # 2552-2553, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD, NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2552-2553
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenter:
Isaac Moradi, NASA

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx (for screen sharing only, see below for Audio):
Event Number:    905 458 573   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=m9876a81238d7e49c4b1dc3d202e9d614

Audio:
  
USA participants: 866-832-9297
Passcode:  6070416

Abstract:
We propose a novel Bayesian Monte Carlo Integration (BMCI) technique to retrieve the profiles of temperature, water vapor, and cloud liquid/ice water content from microwave cloudy measurements in the rainbands of tropical cyclones (TC). These retrievals then can either be directly used by meteorologists to analyze the structure of TCs or be assimilated into numerical models to provide accurate initial conditions for the NWP models. The BMCI technique is applied to the data from the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI).

Bio:

Dr. Isaac Moradi is a remote sensing scientist with over fifteen years of experience specializing in radiative transfer modeling; Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE); data assimilation; satellite data analysis and bias correction; atmospheric humidity and ice clouds; inverse methods and retrieving geophysical variables from satellite observations; solar radiation resource assessment; quality assurance of solar radiation and in-situ radiosonde measurements; and developing new instrument concepts especially for measuring tropospheric humidity. Please also see https://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/sed/bio/isaac.moradi

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

28 October 2019

Title: Tools for Interpreting how and what neural networks learn, and their applications for climate and weather
Presenter(s): Imme Ebert-Uphoff, CIRA, Elizabeth Barnes, CSU, Ben Toms, CSU
Date & Time: 28 October 2019
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
Location: NCWCP - Large Conf Rm - 2554-2555
Description:

STAR Science Seminars
Presenters:
Imme Ebert-Uphoff of CIRA and Elizabeth Barnes and Ben Toms of Colorado State University
(presenting remotely)

Sponsor(s):

STAR Science Seminar Series

Remote Access:
WebEx:
Event Number:    904 841 535   
Password: STARSeminar
Event address for attendees:
https://noaa-nesdis-star.webex.com/noaa-nesdis-star/j.php?MTID=ma4af12891805bfb155ba26ba1d4a4330

Audio:
  
    +1-415-527-5035 US Toll
    Access code: 904 841 535

Abstract:
TBD
About the

Presenter(s):

Imme Ebert-Uphoff received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mathematics from the Technical University of Karlsruhe (known today as Karlsruhe Institute of Technology or KIT).  She received M.S and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. She was a faculty member in Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech for over 10 years, before joining the Electrical & Computer Engineering department at Colorado State in 2011 as research professor.  Her research interests are in applying data science methods to climate applications.  She is also very involved in activities to build bridges between the AI community and the earth science community, including serving on the steering committee of the annual Climate Informatics workshop, and of the NSF sponsored research coordination network (RCN) on Intelligent Systems for the Geosciences.  Starting July 1, 2019, she is spending 50% of her time with CIRA to support their machine learning activities.
Dr. Elizabeth (Libby) Barnes is an associate professor of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. She joined the CSU faculty in 2013 after obtaining dual B.S. degrees (Honors) in Physics and Mathematics from the University of Minnesota, obtaining her Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from the University of Washington, and spending a year as a NOAA Climate & Global Change Fellow at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Professor Barnes' research is focused on large scale atmospheric variability and the data analysis tools used to understand its dynamics. Topics of interest include jet-stream dynamics, Arctic-midlatitude connections, subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) prediction of extreme weather events (she is currently Task Force Lead for the NOAA MAPP Subseasonal-to-Seasonal (S2S) Prediction Task Force), health-related climate impacts, and data science methods for climate research (e.g. machine learning, causal discovery). She teaches graduate courses on fundamental atmospheric dynamics and data science and statistical analysis methods.
Ben Toms is a fourth year PhD student in the Barnes research group in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University.  His PhD research focuses on using neural networks to improve our understanding of decadal predictability within the climate system.  This research requires a fundamental understanding of neural networks and techniques for their interpretation, so he enjoys testing which methods proposed by the computer science community are transferrable to atmospheric science.

POC:
Stacy Bunin, stacy.bunin@noaa.gov
Add seminar: add to Google calendar button

To add the STAR Seminar's calendar to your Google Calendar:

  1. Open your Google calendar.
  2. On the left, above 'My Calendars', click 'Add' and then select 'From URL'.
  3. Paste in:
    https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/noaa.gov_hvn8pjdu449t75uosgrahqb1u4%40group.calendar.google.com/public/basic.ics
  4. Click the 'Add Calendar' button.

Then the STAR Seminars calendar will appear on the left side of your calendar controls under 'Other calendars'. It may take up to 12 hours for changes to appear in your Google Calendar.

Use Google Chrome to remotely join Webex sessions for STAR seminars. Webex's required plugin is built-in to Chrome. If you want to use Webex from Firefox, you must arrange to have the AdminLAN team install the plug-in on your computer in advance of the seminar you wish to attend.


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